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**MALAPROP’S Bookstore/Café – August & September Events

Malaprop’s Café has evolved into the meeting place in our town. Our café boasts a literary menu, with treats from local bakeries and organic, fair-trade, shade-grown coffee roasted locally. We offer free wireless service and eight plug-in stations. Our baristas embrace the role of community catalyst. Join us whenever you can!  (Listen to Audiobooks and Support Malaprop’s Bookstore)

Wednesday, August 1 at 6 pm

Jaime Fleres presents Birth Your Story: Why Writing about Your Birth Matters

Reclaim your birth story through writing. A memoir and guide encouraging us to engage in the deep and transformational process of recording and reclaiming our birth stories as individuals, as women, and as a culture.


Thursday, August 2 at 6 pm

Billy T. Ogletree presents Mean Christianity: Finding Our Way Back to Christ’s Likeness

Ogletree asks us to consider the ways Christian rhetoric and morality have disguised cruel acts, laments the negative perception of Christianity held by many,  and reintroduces us to Christ’s original message of kindness.


Friday, August 3 at 6 pm

Colleen Hoover presents All Your Perfects *OFFSITE AND TICKETED*

The #1 New York Times bestselling author of It Ends with Us presents a heartbreaking novel about a marriage mired in a lifetime of lies and mistakes, and intimacy unraveling under the threat of infertility. “Hoover’s latest valiant and compelling…novel packs her trademark emotional punch… The power and pain of the relationship will stay with readers even as Hoover offers hope.”–Booklist

*Go to malaprops.com/event for tickets and details


Saturday, August 4 at 2 pm

Where’s Waldo Raffle Drawing

Lemonade and cupcakes will be on offer as we see which of the Waldo sleuths from July’s search wins the prizes!


Saturday, August 4 at 6 pm

Cecil Bothwell presents Fifty Wheys to Love Your Liver

The long-serving Asheville politician and author of She Walks on Water and Finding Your Way In Asheville has returned with another wildly creative collection of short fiction.


Sunday, August 5 at 3 pm

Poetrio

Join us for a monthly celebration of poetry featuring three poets. This month, we welcome Lisa Dordal, author of Mosaic of the Dark, Henrietta Goodman, author of All That Held Us, and Emily Rosko, author of Weather Inventions.


Tuesday, August 7 at 6 pm

Susanna Kearsley presents Bellewether

A museum curator at the historic Wilde House encounters the spirit of a French Canadian lieutenant and learns that his forbidden love for the Wilde daughter, Lydia may not have ended as the tragic legend tells. A romantic retelling of the legendary forbidden love between Jean-Philippe and Lydia Wilde. Fans of Diana Gabaldon will love Kearsley’s work.


Wednesday, August 8 at 6 pm

Amber Tamblyn presents Any Man

A debut novel from the poet, actress, and founding member of Time’s Up that interrogates rape culture through a genre-bending narrative that upends the notion of what a rape victim looks like by featuring six male victims of the serial rapist Maude. She gives a powerful and timely voice to victims of sexual violence.  


Thursday, August 9 at 6 pm

Maia Toll presents The Illustrated Herbiary: Guidance and Rituals from 36 Bewitching Botanicals

Herbalist and co-owner of Asheville’s own The Herbiary, Maia Toll, captures the beauty and wisdom of 36 herbs, fruits, and flowers in this stunning book. Tarot inspired cards blend the practical and spiritual elements of each plant to deepen our relationship to the earth and connect with healing properties.


Friday, August 10 at 6 pm

Bud Harris presents The Rage and the Shame: Facing Ourselves After the 2016 Election and Reclaiming the Heart of Our Democracy

A Jungian analyst helps us understand and identify the culminating factors that influenced the 2016 election results and directs us on the journey towards accepting the hard truths he argues we must face about who we are as individuals and as a nation so that true change can begin.  


Sunday, August 12 at 3 pm

Carley Mattimore presents Sacred Messengers of Shamanic Africa: Teachings from Zep Tepi, the Land of First Time

A shamanic psychotherapist and teacher connects us to the wisdom of ancient Africa and guides us on the path towards discovering the spiritual warrior within. This book is a great accompaniment to anyone seeking a deeper knowledge of shamanism and the healing power of animals.


Tuesday, August 14 at 6 pm

Donna Lucey presents Sargent’s Women: Four Lives Behind the Canvas in conversation with Denise Kiernan

A profile of four women portrayed by painter John Singer Sargent. Primary source documents illuminate their lives and reveal an unconventional and daring independence that challenges the historical assumptions about female socialites during the Gilded Age. “Like characters from the writings of Edith Wharton, [these women] were smart, passionate, willful, adventurous and striking.”–Alexander C. Kafka


Wednesday, August 15 at 6 pm

Susan Anderson presents Paul’s Prayers: A Mother’s Account of Raising an Autistic Son

Psychotherapist and author of Taming Your Outer Child reflects on the compassion, frustration, and triumph of raising her autistic son. Her memoir recounts the process of discovering that Paul was autistic, the challenges that he faces, and the prominent role that faith has played in his life.


Thursday, August 16 at 6 pm

Brooke McAlary presents Slow: Simple Living for a Frantic World

McAlary became burned out and depressed after attempts to “keep up with the Joneses” resulted in too much work, too many possessions and too little time to enjoy them. She shares her own process of simplifying her life and makes recommendations like decluttering, practicing mindfulness, and putting down the phone in favor of quality human interaction.


Friday, August 17 at 6 pm

Byron Ballard presents Earth Works: Ceremonies in Tower Time

A book of essays and rituals to help us through this time of deep cultural change, a shift that author Byron Ballard calls “Tower Time.” This books includes both an analysis of the forces at work on our planet and rituals to foster courage and resilience.


Saturday, August 18 at 11 am

Jerald Pope presents Owl Girl

A beautifully illustrated, magical fairy tale about a little girl who is raised by owls and must choose between her owl family and her human family.


Sunday, August 19 at 3 pm

Paula Brown Stafford and Lisa T. Grimes present Remember Who YOU Are: Achieve Success. Create Balance. Experience Fulfillment

This team of wildly successful, yet relatable women offer advice for women who seek advancement and a better quality of life, and men looking to improve their working relationships with women. Learn how achieving success, creating balance and finding meaning in life are all about reconnecting with who you are.


Monday, August 20 at 6 pm

Madeline Uraneck presents How to Make a Life: A Tibetan Refugee Family and the Midwestern Woman They Adopted

When Uranek helped a Tibetan refugee family settle in her hometown town of Madison, Wisconsin, a simple kindness sparked unanticipated friendship and belonging. Part immersive journalism and memoir, this is an immigration tale that highlights the blessings that come with bridging old traditions with new, and crossing cultural divides. It could not be more timely.


Tuesday, August 21 at 6 pm

Terry Roberts launches The Holy Ghost Speakeasy and Revival Show

Jedidiah Robbins is a preacher full of contradictions. He rides his Gospel Train through Prohibition Era Appalachia, delivering more than just the Holy Spirit.  Bridging the gap between mountain stills and small town speakeasies, he travels a dangerous path, facing threats from corrupt law enforcement, approaching his own brand of salvation.  


Wednesday, August 22 at 6 pm

Debby Schriver presents Whispering in the Daylight: The Children of Tony Alamo Christian Ministries and Their Journey to Freedom

A highly compelling, emotionally gripping investigation into the history of a cult charged with isolating and traumatizing children. Includes testimony from former cult members. A tribute to the courage and resilience of individuals and children.


Tursday, August 23 at 6 pm

Orison Prize Winners Carly Joy Miller and Gabriel Houck

In the poetry collection, Ceremonial, Carly Joy Miller explores the body at its most sublime and at its most feral. Her lines resemble piano wire around the neck of a scary clown. But they also reward with her uncanny sense for knowing just when to lower the heat, just when to acknowledge her better angels. In You or a Loved One: Stories, an adolescent Dungeon Master discovers the fact of his queerness while traversing the spooky realm that lies beyond childhood. And a lonesome bachelor hides a fugitive woman in his underground bunker while reckoning with the ghosts of dead loved ones.  

Saturday, August 25 at 3 pm *Note special time

A Special Founders Day Celebration of National Parks

Gary Machlis presents The Future of Conservation in America: A Chart for Rough Water.

Scientist and former Director of the National Park Service, Gary Machlis details the present and impending threats to the environment and provides a powerful and lasting resource to the next generation of environmental conservationist leaders.


Sunday, August 26 at 3 pm

TEACH IN: Michael Gerhardt presents Impeachment: What Everyone Needs to Know

Join us for a general primer on the origins, explanation, and current role of the impeachment process in the contemporary political climate. Gerhardt, the only joint witness in the impeachment proceedings against President Clinton, will explain the range of impeachable offenses, alternative ways the Constitution addresses presidential misconduct, why previous impeachments never led to conviction, and more.


Tuesday, August 28 at 6 pm

David Joy presents The Line That Held Us

Author of Where All Light Tends To Go is back with a dark tale of family vendettas, vengeance and violence in the Appalachian mountains. A gritty tale about the destructive consequences that befall a group of people of who cover up an accidental death, and a story of friendship, family, and redemption.


Wednesday, August 29 at 6 pm

An Evening About Fostering and Adoption in Appalachia with Authors Deborah Gold and Wendy Welch

Join us for an evening of shared experiences a discussion of the state of foster care and adoption in the Appalachian region.  Deborah Gold is the author of Counting Down, a powerful and hopeful memoir that challenges the bleak assumption of the foster parent’s experience. Wendy Welch interviewed dozens of social workers, parents, and children intimately familiar with “the system” in her book, Fall or Fly.  Together we will explore the complex emotional, political, and cultural aspects of “what can only be described as a marketplace for our nation’s greatest asset.”


Thursday, August 30 at 6 pm

Tony Wolff presents Lightening Up: The Yoga of Self Acceptance

A frank and humorous response to the high focus on performance and achievement in modern yoga. Wolff shows us how to integrate Buddhism, neuroscience, and mindfulness meditation for a more balanced practice.

Every Wednesday at 10 am

MISS MALAPROP’S STORYTIME!

Malaprop’s hosts storytime with Miss Malaprop! Join us with your wee ones every week on Wednesdays at 10 am for classic and contemporary stories sure to enchant and entertain. Together, we’ll introduce children to the wonderful world of books! Recommended for ages 3-9.



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Join a Book Club!



Wednesday, August  1 at 7 pm

MALAPROP’S BOOK CLUB

Host Jay Jacoby will lead a discussion of Manhattan Beach by Jennifer Egan.



Monday, August 6 at 7 pm

LGBTQ BOOK CLUB

Join host Alex Ruiz for a discussion of Why Be Happy When You Could Be Normal? by Jeanette Winterson.


Tuesday, August 7 at 6:30 pm *New time!*

WOMEN IN LIVELY DISCUSSION BOOK CLUB (WILD)

Join former Malaprop’s General Manager and Bookseller Linda-Marie Barrett and co-host Maria Fire for the WILD Book club at the Battery Park Book Exchange. This month’s title is Welcome to Temptation by Jennifer Crusie.



Tuesday, August  7 at 7 pm

CURRENT EVENTS BOOK CLUB

Join host Bruce Roth for a lively discussion on topics of current interest including war and peace, the economy, the environment, and other hot political topics. The selection for August is No Turning Back: Life, Loss, and Hope in Wartime Syria by Rania Abouzeid.



Monday, August 13 at 7 pm

MYSTERY BOOK CLUB

Join host Tena Frank for a discussion of The Beekeeper’s Apprentice: Or, on the Segregation of the Queen by Laurie R. King.



Tuesday, August  14 at 12 Noon

DISCUSSION BOUND BOOK CLUB

Hosted by the Asheville Art Museum, this monthly discussion is a place to exchange ideas that relate to artworks and the art world. This month’s pick is Stolen by Isabella Stewart.

Thursday, August 16 at 7 pm

NOTORIOUS HBC* (*HISTORY BOOK CLUB)

Join host and Malaprop’s Bookseller Patricia Furnish to discuss a range of books across different periods of history. We’re creating a book club that tackles the challenging subjects, hence “NOTORIOUS.” This month’s pick is Les Parisiennes: Resistance, Collaboration, and the Women of Paris Under Nazi Occupation by Anne Sebba.


Thursday, August 30 at 7 pm

WORKS IN TRANSLATION

Join host and Bookstore manager Justin Souther to discuss writers—and their literature—in translation, and the cultural, political and artistic influences that shape them. This month’s pick is The Years by Annie Ernaux, translated by Alison L. Strayer.

Monday, September 1 at 4 pm *Note special time!  

Georgann Eubanks presents The Month of Their Ripening: North Carolina Heritage Foods through the Year

A collection of stories matching twelve North Carolina heritage foods to their peak month of the year. Join us for a lively celebration of this intriguing book, and wish Georgann a happy birthday!


Sunday, September 2 at 3 pm

Poetrio

Join us for our monthly event featuring three poets. This month we welcome Michael Beadle, author of Beasts of Eden, Anne Harding-Woodworth, author of The Eyes Have It, and Adrian Rice author of The Strange Estate: New & Selected Poems 1986-2017.



Tuesday, September 4 at 6 pm

Jacqui Castle launches The Seclusion

Local journalist and frequent Mountain Xpress contributor Jacqui Castle’s debut YA fiction novel features a unique spin on dystopian America, where the discovery of unedited books from before The Seclusion place Patch and her co-worker Rex in danger of being arrested by the totalitarian Board. A story about searching for the truth, evading arrest, and falling in love.


Friday, September 7 at 6 pm

Randy Bell presents Conversations with America: Confronting the Divisive Challenges of Our Time

What does it mean to be an American today? Covering a range of issues such as government and its responsibility to its people, international relations, the economy and business, discrimination, and human rights, Bell calls for an overall increase in political discussions in our personal and professional lives.  


Saturday, September 8 at 6 pm

Thomas Rain Crowe presents Starting From San Francisco: Beats, Baby Beats & The 1970s San Francisco Renaissance

The forgotten story of the Second San Francisco Renaissance as told by Crowe, in conversation with Arthur Nusbaum & Third Mind Books. Crowe discusses his experiences living and working alongside other influential figures in the 1970s San Francisco literary community.


Sunday, September 9 at 3 pm

Teach in: Carol Anderson presents One Person, No Vote: How Voter Suppression Is Destroying Our Democracy

The author of White Rage is back to walk us through the history of voter suppression in America and the current government-dictated racial discrimination. This teach-in will cover how voter suppression works and the current efforts to restore the basic right to vote. “For the sake of those who fought and died for [the vote], it is up to all of us to insist that this most basic American right be protected. Reading this well-crafted book will arm you with the facts.” – Senator Dick Durbin, from the Foreword


Monday, September 10 at 6 pm

Anne Bogel presents I’d Rather Be Reading

The author of Reading People, and the brains behind the Modern Mrs. Darcy blog and the What Should I Read Next? podcast is back with a collection of reflections on the role reading plays in our lives. Bogel invites book lovers into a community of bibliophiles to discover new approaches to literature and more reasons to love books.


Thursday, September 13 at 6 pm

Phil Hudgins presents Travels with Foxfire: Stories of People, Passions, and Practices from Southern Appalachia

A collection of essays that bring together the best of Southern Appalachian history, geography, traditions, and culture. Discover the origins of stock car racing, the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, gathering wild ginseng, and regional cooking and hear from bootleggers, bear hunters, water dowsers, sculptors, folk singers, novelists, collectors, etc. “A welcome rekindling of the Foxfire franchise of books on Southern folkways… a must for fans of the original series.” — Kirkus Reviews


Sunday, September 16 at 3 pm

Writers at Home

Join host Tommy Hays to kick off a new season of our monthly reading series featuring work from UNCA’s Great Smokies Writing Program and The Great Smokies Review.


Monday, September 17 at 6 pm

Grace Lin presents A Big Mooncake For Little Star

Little Star’s mother puts the Big Mooncake (an Asian holiday treat) to cool in the night sky, but Little Star nibbles a little bit every night until only a crescent, and Mama and Little Star must make another. This bedtime folktale comforts and teaches kids about Asian American culture and the lunar phases,  alongside Lin’s magical paintings of the night sky.


Tuesday, September 18 at 6 pm

Apricot Irving presents The Gospel of Trees

Told against the backdrop of Haiti’s long history of intervention—often unwelcome—Irving’s prose grapples with the complicated legacy of those who wish to improve the world. Drawing from family letters, cassette tapes, journals, and interviews, it is an exploration of missionary culpability and idealism, told from within.


Wednesday, September 19 at 6 pm

Carol Adams presents Protest Kitchen: Fight Injustice, Save the Planet, and Fuel Your Resistance One Meal at a Time

The first book to explore the ways in which a more plant-based diet challenges regressive politics and affect issues of justice, misogyny, national security, and human rights. Features vegan recipes, resources to avoid supporting child-labor, and instructions for making cleaning supplies not tested on animals.


Thursday, September 20 at 6 pm

Mark de Castrique presents Secret Undertaking

The seventh installment in the Buryin’ Barry mystery series finds Barry, part-time deputy sheriff and funeral home director exposing corruption and investigating suspicious deaths in Gainesboro, North Carolina. When bodies start to pile up and the federal government steps in, Barry and the Sheriff must save their small town from large-scale crime.


Saturday, September 22 at 6 pm

Quincy Troupe presents Miles and Me

An intimate and candid account of friendship with Miles Davis-soon to be a major motion picture! Poet, activist, and journalist Quincy Troupe collaborated with Miles Davis on Miles: The Autobiography. Troupe’s memoir offers a deeper look at the restless energy at the root of Davis’ creative process and powerful personality. A reflection of the men’s friendship and a testament to Davis’ influence in both the public and private spheres.


Tuesday, September 25 at 6 pm

Michele Young-Stone presents Lost in the Beehive

Gloria Ricci is followed by bees. Bees are there when her mother loses twins; when she develops romantic feelings for a girl; when she flees to 1960’s Greenwich Village; and when she learns that her husband has a dark side. It’s only when Gloria needs the bees the most that she discovers why.


Wednesday, September 26 at 6 pm

Payson Kennedy presents NOC Stories: Changing Lives at the Nantahala Outdoor Center Since 1972

The Nantahala Outdoor Center (NOC) began in 1972, with a group of friends working together to change their lives through outdoor sports. NOC Stories is a collection of 62 stories by former NOC staff and illustrate the center’s birth and influence over a period of 25 years. This event will bring a handful of contributors together to tell a tale that will interest whitewater sports enthusiasts and fans of the NOC, as well as those interested in digging deep into our region’s history.


Thursday, September 27 at 6 pm

Bobbie Ann Mason presents Patchwork: A Bobbie Ann Mason Reader

A brilliant and multifaceted collection by the author of Shiloh and Other Stories and the novels In Country and The Girl in the Blue Béret.  The short stories, chapters from Mason’s novels, excerpts from nonfiction and Mason’s recent explorations in flash fiction convey skill across literary genres.



Friday, September 28 at 6 pm

Beth Revis presents Give the Dark My Love in conversation with F.T. Lukens

Seventeen-year-old Nedra Brysstain leaves her home in the rural, northern territories of Lunar Island to attend the prestigious Yugen Academy with only one goal in mind: master the trade of medicinal alchemy. When plague sweeps through the region, Nedra turns to the darkest, most forbidden practice of necromancy in search of a cure. Beth Revis will engage in a discussion with fellow writer, F.T. Lukens, author of The Rules and Regulations for Mediating Myths & Magic.  

 

——–

Every Wednesday at 10 am

MISS MALAPROP’S STORYTIME!

Malaprop’s hosts storytime with Miss Malaprop! Join us with your wee ones every week on Wednesdays at 10 am for classic and contemporary stories sure to enchant and entertain. Together, we’ll introduce children to the wonderful world of books! Recommended for ages 3-9.



——–



Join a Book Club!

Monday, September 3 at 7 pm

LGBTQ BOOK CLUB

Join host Alex Ruiz for a discussion of Carry On by Rainbow Rowell.



Tuesday, September 4  at 7 pm

CURRENT EVENTS BOOK CLUB

Join host Bruce Roth for a lively discussion on topics of current interest including war and peace, the economy, the environment, and other hot political topics. This month’s pick is The Perfect Weapon: War, Sabotage, and Fear in the Cyber Age by David E. Sanger.



Tuesday, September 4 at 6:30 pm *New time!*

WOMEN IN LIVELY DISCUSSION BOOK CLUB (WILD)

Join former Malaprop’s General Manager and Bookseller Linda-Marie Barrett and co-host Maria Fire for the WILD Book club at the Battery Park Book Exchange. The pick for September is Heart Berries: A Memoir by Terese Marie Mailhot.


Wednesday, September 5 at 7 pm

MALAPROP’S BOOK CLUB

Host Jay Jacoby will lead a discussion of The Selected Poems of Donald Hall.



Monday, September 10 at 7 pm

MYSTERY BOOK CLUB

Join host Tena Frank for a discussion of Garden of Lamentations: A Novel by Duncan Kincaid and Gemma James.



Tuesday, September 11 at 12 Noon

DISCUSSION BOUND BOOK CLUB

Hosted by the Asheville Art Museum, this monthly discussion is a place to exchange ideas that relate to artworks and the art world. This month’s pick is Autumn: A Novel by Ali Smith.



Thursday, September 20 at 7 pm

NOTORIOUS HBC* (*HISTORY BOOK CLUB)

Join host and Malaprop’s Bookseller Patricia Furnish to discuss a range of books across different periods of history. We’re creating a book club that tackles the challenging subjects, hence “NOTORIOUS.” This month’s pick is The Ugly Renaissance: Sex, Greed, Violence and Depravity in an Age of Beauty by Alexander Lee.


Thursday, September, 27 at 7 pm

WORKS IN TRANSLATION

Join host and Bookstore manager Justin Souther to discuss writers—and their literature—in translation, and the cultural, political and artistic influences that shape them. This month’s pick is Outlaws by Javier Cercas, translated by Anne McLean.

 
 
 
 

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SheVille Team

We are a one-of-a-kind magazine that provides local, regional, national and international information about women’s lives and education, performing and visual arts and writing, the environment, green living and sustainability and regional Western North Carolina business, people and events. “Villages preserve culture: dress, food and dance are a few examples. As villages grow in population and turn into towns, local cafes make way for large American chains. Handmade leather sandals are discarded for a pair of Western sneakers. Due to its small size, a village fosters a tight-knit sense of community. Justpeace.org explains the meaning of the African proverb, “It takes a village,” by stating that a sense of community is critical to maintaining a healthy society. Village members hold a wealth of information regarding their heritage: they know about the ancient traditions, methods of production and the resources of the land. When villages become dispersed or exterminated in times of war, this anthropological knowledge disappears. Large cities are not as conducive to growing and producing foods such as fruits and vegetables. Villages, on the other hand, usually have ample amounts of land and other resources necessary for growing conditions.” The Importance of Villages by Catherine Capozzi Our Mission SheVille.org provides readers with information important to women’s lives and well-being. We focus primarily on the areas of education & health, business & finance, the arts & the environment. We are particularly interested in local & regional resources, organizations & events.
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