Sheville

Health & Fitness

Nourishment of the mind and body go hand in hand on the journey. Keeping the body healthy and fit is an important means of supporting and aiding that nourishment.  In this section you will find information to  contribute to women’s health, the growth and well-being of the mind, body and spirit. As you know,Asheville and Western North Carolina have much to offer.  Your topic and contributor ideas are welcomed.
Our Voice Rape Crisis     Helpmate Asheville Online     Medscape Women’s Health News    Breast Cancer Coalition     Our Bodies Ourselves     N C Domestic Violence Crisis And Support Resources       Violence Against Women     Environmental Health Trust    

Domestic Violence – Know the Signs

Know the Signs

Domestic violence is often more than just physical abuse. It encompasses sexual, emotional, economic and psychological violence. Initially, identifying the signs of an abusive relationship can be difficult, especially if the abuser uses subtle tactics to gain power and control.  It is very common for survivors to recognize the beginning of the abuse as the first time the abusers hit them, but really the cycle of violence may have started early on in the relationship. Perpetrators tend to be charming and very convincing when exerting power and control tactics. However, understanding common occurrences or patterns in an unhealthy relationship and being able to begin an informed conversation is a major step to healing and helping others to join in understanding why and how domestic violence occurs.


A BEAUTIFUL MIND Mental Workouts To Strengthen Your Brain

Have you ever walked into a room and forgot what you went in there for? Perhaps you lost your train of thought mid conversation after being distracted by a noise. Maybe you forgot a name or a number or to buy milk. We’re human! We forget things. However, the more we multitask, the less we focus and the verdict is out on how this affects our brains long term.

So how do we strengthen our brains? Dr. Sanam Hafeez PsyD a New York City based licensed neuropsychologist and teaching faculty member at the prestigious Columbia University Teacher’s College, shares how we can exercise our minds and master our memory.

How do brain activities play a role in strengthening the brain?

Dr. Hafeez explains that just like physical exercise, brain exercises strengthen and keep the mind agile and active. “You have a cognitive reserve, a finite amount of memory, problem solving and visual motor even verbal reasoning skills that declines over time. The more you engage your brain, the longer you can hold on to your cognitive reserve,” explains Dr. Hafeez. 

What are some brain-boosting activities someone could do before work?

There are a lot of activities one can do to boost your brain. Research shows that any stimulating activity will “boost” circulation and activate areas of the brain. According to Dr. Hafeez things like writing with your left hand, trying to remember phone numbers, doing mental math calculations, the daily crossword, or looking up a new word in the dictionary on a daily basis, helps your mind stretch in ways you can’t see but certainly feel. “The frustration that you feel when doing something that’s mentally taxing is when you know your brain is getting a workout. It’s good for you,” she says.  

How do brain-boosting exercises help when it comes to work life?

There are a lot of websites and computer generated programs that offer memory training and visual spatial exercises. Dr. Hafeez suggests looking for puzzles, numerical sequences, and recall activities that can help boost processing speed, attention and memory. Just like your body, the more you do, the more your brain can stretch and accommodate.

How does doing these exercises before work enhance our performance?

“Doing something stimulating and challenging, before work, gets your brain geared up for the day. If you run two miles in the morning, walking seems like a stroll. Similarly, if you perform math calculations as you’re driving or insist on spelling words backwards for the fun of it will make the stuff you do at work every day seem like a breeze. It’ll make you more aware and vigilant not to mention focused and almost raring to keep moving from one task to the next,” Dr. Hafeez explains. 

Can it enhance our performance in other areas of our lives? If so, which areas and why/how?

Mental health practitioners agree that over time, brain boosters such as learning a new language, a sport, a musical instrument, or painting, sewing, arts and crafts, boost the brain in bigger, more long-term ways. “It may even reduce or delay the onset on Alzheimer’s and other mental decline, again by strengthening the cognitive reserve. Brain exercises are good for one’s overall daily health and may actually protect one from more serious ailments. Daily smaller brain boosters can help with mental agility, daily memory, an active work and even social life, by helping increase attention, focus and creative, problem solving skills,” adds Dr. Hafeez.

About Dr. Sanam Hafeez:

Dr. Sanam Hafeez PsyD is an NYC based licensed neuropsychologist. She is a teaching faculty member at the prestigious Columbia University Teacher’s College and the founder and clinical director of the Comprehend the Mind Institutes in Manhattan and Queens. She was a long time child school psychologist. She specializes in providing neuropsychological, educational and developmental evaluations to both adults and children in her practice.  She works with individuals who suffer from post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), learning disabilities, autism, attention and memory problems, trauma and brain injury, abuse, childhood development and psychopathology (bipolar, schizophrenia, depression, anxiety, etc…) In addition, Dr. Hafeez serves as a medical expert for various news outlets and programs, and as an expert witness providing full evaluations and witness testimony to law firms and courts. Connect with her via twitter @comprehendMindor at www.comprehendthemind.com


Bringing Pelvic Organ Prolapse Out of the Shadows

Recently, I was at a baby shower. I overheard a mother of two teenagers relay the story of her many postpartum surprises to a young woman with no children who wondered out loud what kinds of changes happen to a woman’s body after giving birth. One of the shocks the older mother shared included problems with urinary incontinence that followed her pregnancies and never entirely went away. It may not have been typical party conversation, but as more women dig past their embarrassment to share their experiences with urinary incontinence and other pelvic floor disorders, we chip away at the stigma that prevents women of all ages from seeking help. Continue reading


Growing Up the Internet

 

MS. KRISTA TIPPETT, HOST: Tiffany Shlain thinks of the internet when she thinks of her favorite quote of the naturalist John Muir, that “when you tug at a single thing in the universe, you find it’s attached to everything else.” She is an internet pioneer and a filmmaker committed to reframing technology as an expression of the best of what humanity is capable, with all the complexity that entails. She founded the Webby Awards — the “Oscars of the Internet” — which is celebrating its 20th anniversary this year. And for over six years she and her young family have held to a technology sabbath or “shabbat” — 24 unplugged hours each week. Her perspective on our technology-enhanced lives is ultimately a purposeful and enriching one — the internet is our global brain, towards which we can apply all the wisdom we are gaining about the brains in our heads and the character in our lives. Continue reading


*ON BEING & How Trauma Lodges in the Body – with Krista Tippett

Bessel van der Kolk— How Trauma Lodges in the Body  
Human memory is a sensory experience, says psychiatrist Bessel van der Kolk. Through his longtime research and innovation in trauma treatment, he shares what he’s learning about how bodywork like yoga or eye movement therapy can restore a sense of goodness and safety. What he’s learning speaks to a resilience we can all cultivate in the face of the overwhelming events — which, after all, make up the drama of culture, of news, and of life.

» Listen on our website
» Subscribe on iTunes


UNCG professor offers six messages you can send to an abuser

Journalists and experts focus on victims of domestic violence, and rightly so, says Dr. Christine Murray, associate professor of counseling at The University of North Carolina at Greensboro and co-founder of the See the Triumph campaign to empower survivors. But, Murray asks, what should you say to a friend or loved one if they are the abuser?

“Assuming the person trusts and respects your opinion, you have an opportunity to send some powerful messages that could encourage them to stop the abuse,” she says. “Ask yourself, ‘If I’m not taking action against the abuse, am I actually helping to perpetuate it?’ By taking a strong stand against the violence, you have the opportunity to send important messages to the person that the abuse is harmful, it is their responsibility, and they can choose to change it and get help to do so.”

Message #1: “The abuse is wrong.”
Make sure, through both your words and your actions, that you make clear that you do not support the abuse in any way. Don’t laugh off the abuse or lead them to think that it’s okay that they’re using abusive behaviors. If you don’t feel comfortable saying anything to them, consider the possible impact of your silence. Be mindful that the person may think that, because you haven’t said anything, you think it’s okay or normal for them to treat their partner that way.

Message #2: “You are hurting your partner.”
You can play a role in holding the person accountable for their actions by pointing out the actual impact of the abuse. If that “little slap” left a black eye, remind them of the severity and say that you think it was a bigger deal than they’re making it out to be. If they claim that their partner is just being “too sensitive,” you can talk to them about how you think they’re responding in a normal, expected way to being abused.

Message #3: “There are other negative consequences of the abuse.”
It’s important to remind abusive partners of all the negative consequences they’ve already faced — and could face in the future — if their abusive behaviors continue.
This may include risking arrest and jail; risking their career if they face legal consequences; other financial consequences related to legal sanctions; losing relationships with friends and family members; and the embarrassment, tarnished reputation and loss of standing that may occur if other people find out about the abuse.

Message #4: “You are responsible for your own actions. You are also responsible for doing whatever you need to do to change them.”
We’ve heard so, so many times in our research that survivors of abuse were blamed for their abuse by their partners and others in their lives. Victim-blaming perpetuates the abuse by attributing the responsibility for changing it to the person with the least control over doing so. Remind the abuser of their own responsibility for stopping their abusive behaviors and for taking the steps needed to make this change.

Message #5: “There are resources available to help you stop abusing your partner.”
In most areas in the United States, there are court-sanctioned batterer intervention programs that are designed to educate and support people to change their abusive behaviors in intimate relationships. In many cases, these programs are also open to clients who are voluntarily seeking help. If you don’t already know whether this program exists in your community, contact your state domestic violence coalition to find out what resources are available near you. Keep in mind that, in general, couples therapy is not advised when there is violence present.

Message #6: “If you do not stop abusing your partner, I will….”
Where will you draw the line? At some point, you may face a decision to take action to try to stop this person’s abusive behaviors, even if it could mean hurting your relationship with them. For example, you may witness a severe act of physical violence. Will you call the police to report it? Will you cut off your relationship with them and lend your support to their partner? Of course, any decision you make should take into account their partner’s safety, as well as the safety of any involved children and yourself.

###
October is National Domestic Violence Awareness Month. More than 1 in 3 women and more than 1 in 4 men in the U.S. have experienced rape, physical violence and/or stalking by an intimate partner in their lifetime, according to the National Domestic Violence Abuse Hotline.

The University of North Carolina at Greensboro is a challenging, supportive and engaged community where learning is carried forward to Do something bigger altogether. Founded in 1891, UNCG is the largest and most diverse university in the Triad, serving nearly 18,000 students. Standing apart from other universities, the UNCG community is joined together by a shared value: We define excellence not only by the people we attract, but by the meaningful contributions they make.

 

 


Crisis Pregnancy Centers and the Myth of “Post-Abortion Syndrome”

“Post-abortion syndrome” — the idea that abortion causes significant mental health damage — is not a real, evidence-based diagnosis.

While individuals who have abortions may have a wide variety of positive and negative feelings afterward (as do women who continue their pregnancies), there is no sound evidence that having an abortion itself leads to psychological harm. Studies that anti-abortion activists claim support the notion are often methodologically flawed, or have been misinterpreted. ( this article suggested by Va Boyle )  Continue reading


10 Natural Remedies for Depression

As with many mental conditions, people who suffer from depression often feel that it is impossible to overcome. This is made worse by the fact that the symptoms of depression usually include having low energy levels  and motivation. There is no simple solution to depression but many people find that a combination of natural remedies and therapies can help them to beat it. Continue reading


Women’s Wellbeing and Development Foundation News

This fall, WWD-F is developing some exciting programs at its Hillcrest Resource Center.There will be some practical workshops and classes for the residents, including a course in soap making, a doula training for residents, and GED tutoring classes. We have also partnered with the Manna Food Bank to run a monthly food pop-up for the community that provides fresh produce and other grocery items to families in need.

The HRC is also expanding its Get Fit Hillcrest initiative by offering a variety of workshops and opportunities for residents to get serious about their health through diet and exercise. And new on the horizon is the Hillcrest Youth Initiative, a week-long after-school program for middle school youth.


WNC BIRTH CENTER – a 501(c)(3) organization

WNC Birth Center is the first of its kind in our region to provide comprehensive primary and preventive care from adolescence through menopause and beyond to women seeking high-quality, personalized healthcare in a homelike  environment. Complete maternity care, from pregnancy planning through childbirth, postpartum and breastfeeding, is an important component of our services and is available to all pregnant women with a low-risk pregnancy.

WNC Birth Center believes:

*Compassionate care for women of all ages is beneficial to the family and society

*Birth is a normal process that is enhanced by a safe, familiar and relaxing environment

*Education, knowledge and evidence-based practices form the foundation of optimal health

*Family participation is an important aspect of quality patient care

*Breastmilk is the optimal food for babies

*Raising awareness about midwifery, normal birth and birth center care is one of our priorities

*Education of medical residents and midwifery students results in better healthcare for many who never enter our birth center

*Everyone deserves respect regardless of age, race, ethnicity, religion, socio-economic status, gender, sexual orientation or marital status

*All women have the right to quality healthcare and the unique services offered at our center. 

For more information visit our website WNC Birth Center    

*WNC Birth Center is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization. All donations are tax deductible to the fullest extent of the law.

Photo credit:  Seana Berglund at Babymoon Birth Services

 


Take Heart: Three Important Steps for Heart Health and Why Minority Women are at Greatest Risk

For years we’ve been focused on improving heart health overall. For men and women. Yet cardiovascular disease is still the number one cause of death among women here in the U.S. and women are still at high risk – minority women even more so. Racial and ethnic minority populations confront more barriers to a heart disease diagnosis and care, receive lower quality treatment, and experience worse health outcomes than their white counterparts.


Caregivers Get Fit Blogspot

Caregivers Get Fit Blogspot by Dr. Denise D’Angelo

A motivational health and wellness blog sharing humor, wit, wisdom and support for caregivers who embrace a holistic healing vision.  Insights and health tips for caregivers living with dementia, and people caring for people who embrace a holistic healing vision. Continue Reading


“End ME/CFS” Mega Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Project Begins

Now this is exciting.
The Open Medicine Foundation (OMF) has announced it has created and is raising funds for a huge “End ME/CFS” project. They’re looking for five million dollars a year to fund it — about double the NIH’s current annual spending on all ME/CFS research. That’s a really ambitious project. Could they actually pull it off?

“What is needed is a total attack on the problem.” – Ron Davis PhD

( This information was submitted to SheVille by Amy Mandel )

I think they could, and the reason why starts with Ron Davis PhD, the originator and leader of the project. Davis has been thinking about producing a high-level consortium to attack Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) for years. The idea of a consortium immediately came up when I first talked to him about three years ago. His son, Whitney, had introduced us. Whitney was quite ill then, but since then has gotten much worse. He now has one of the worst cases of ME/CFS I’ve heard of.

Read more: “End ME/CFS” Mega Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Project Begins http://www.cortjohnson.org/blog/2014/10/11/end-mecfs-mega-chronic-fatigue-syndrome-project-begins/

I think they could, and the reason why starts with Ron Davis PhD, the originator and leader of the project. Davis has been thinking about producing a high-level consortium to attack Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) for years. The idea of a consortium immediately came up when I first talked to him about three years ago. His son, Whitney, had introduced us. Whitney was quite ill then, but since then has gotten much worse. He now has one of the worst cases of ME/CFS I’ve heard of.

Read more: “End ME/CFS” Mega Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Project Begins http://www.cortjohnson.org/blog/2014/10/11/end-mecfs-mega-chronic-fatigue-syndrome-project-begins/

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Blog


2014 SYLVA Grief Support Group Meets Weekly – Fridays

 

Weekly Grief Support Group in Sylva allows each individual to grieve in his or her own way

SYLVA, N.C. – Each individual grieves in his or her own way, says Michael Lee, counselor of bereavement services with Four Seasons Compassion for Life’s Sylva offices.

“While many people will find that they do not need or want help with their grief, some people will seek individual counseling. Others want group support,” he says.

Every loss is different in some way, but grief often shares common characteristics of leaving people feeling isolated by feelings of sadness and loss. Through support groups, individuals can find validation and feel like they are not alone.

“Come as you are,” says Lee. “This is a safe and welcoming gathering of people from all walks of life. We know everyone’s story and journey are different.  You don’t have to talk; you can just come and listen.”

The Grief Support Group sponsored by Four Seasons Compassion for Life is free and open to the public. Meetings are Fridays, 1-2:30 p.m. at First Baptist Church, 669 W. Main Street. Contact Michael Lee, bereavement counselor, mlee@fourseasonscfl.org for information or support.

Four Seasons Compassion for Life is a non-profit organization with a dedicated team of health care professionals, social workers, spiritual care professionals and volunteers. Nationally known for its leadership in innovative, quality hospice services, Four Seasons is a Circle of Life award recipient from the American Medical Association. For more information, visit http://www.fourseasonscfl.org.


Western North Carolina Health Advocates Seeking Volunteers

Western North Carolina Health Advocates holds regular volunteer training for its Patient Pals and Family Friends peer support program.

Patient Pals and Family Friends provides trained volunteers to people who have illness or disability and are socially isolated. Our volunteers become friend and advocate, helping people learn to advocate for themselves. We help people list questions they want to ask a physician or caseworker, and our volunteers may accompany a person to an appointment to assure the questions are asked and that they fully understand the answers.

Volunteers also help people get out of the house and may go to museums, movies, take walks or go for coffee, helping them get back into a world from which they have withdrawn because of illness or disability. Volunteers also may provide brief respite for caregivers, although they are not allowed to give medications or perform any medical duties.

WNCHA asks volunteers to commit to at least one hour a week for six months or longer. Training lasts about three hours and includes information on active listening, advocacy, dealing with cultural differences and stress, HIPPA rules, averting emotional crises and more.

The training is free and light refreshments are provided. For information or to register, e-mail tj.wncha@gmail.com or call Leslie at 828-243-6712 or TJ at 828-424-8321.

About WNC Health Advocates: We are a nonprofit health care advocacy, education and support agency founded in memory of Mike Danforth, who died of colon cancer in 2008 because he did not have access to health care. Our mission is to offer comfort and support to people with illness and disability and their families, to educate and to advocate for access to quality health care for all.


Asheville, NC Current Weather
73°
clear sky
humidity: 56%
H 89 • L 61
80°
Sun
75°
Mon
75°
Tue
Weather from OpenWeatherMap