Sheville

"WNC women's online
magazine for everyone"

Food, Farm & Market

Here’s a more literally “juicy” section that contains information especially about foods produced in our region, foods with enhanced freshness and nutritional value. You’ll find offerings about what’s going on with the local food industry in the WNC mountains.
Appalachian Sustainable Agriculture Project     Slow Food Asheville     Asheville Independent Restaurants     Foodtopia Asheville   

WNC Women in Agriculture Spring Gathering April 29 – 5 to 8 pm Black Mountain

 
 
 
 
 
 
Saturday, April 29 at 5 PM – 8 PM

Dr. John Wilson Community Garden  99 White Pine Drive, Black Mountain, NC

Women interested in and involved with food and farming will come together for our quarterly gathering. We’ll share a potluck meal, friendship and a great opportunity to network and learn from each other. The theme of “crop mobbing” has emerged for this gathering: what do you need, how can you give, what would you like to know?


The Asheville City Market is moving to a new location this season: North Market Street!

The Asheville City Market is moving to a new location this season: North Market Street! The freshest, best-tasting food in the area will now take over two blocks of downtown Asheville every Saturday morning. You’ll still find your favorite vendors of farm-fresh produce, meat, dairy, and local artisan products, as well as brand-new offerings in the expanded market.

Asheville City Market South remains at its location in the center of Biltmore Park Town Square and will be open every Wednesday afternoon for your
mid-week shopping needs.  Click for more information


Asheville City Market Announces New Downtown Location Opening April 1

Asheville’s premier downtown farmers market opens on North Market Street on April 1

Asheville City Market, one of the region’s vibrant farmers markets, is moving to a new, street-closed location in downtown Asheville. Starting on April 1, Asheville City Market will be open on North Market Street, between Woodfin Street and East Walnut Street, where shoppers can enjoy open-air shopping for goods offered by local farmers, craftspeople, bakers, and other vendors.


Pick and Preserve – preserving food, farming and community

My vision started many years ago and came to fruition when my partner, Andrew, bought his farm, Ashe’ Spring. We live together on the farm and are in the process of creating a homesteading environment. 
Ashe` Spring will soon become one of the main sources of fruit for Pick & Preserve. Until then, I am excited to work with local farms and the abundance of resources we have in the area. My goal is to work closely with, and get to know, each person and family who grow the beautiful produce we use. I also want to recognize and show appreciation for those who support our vision. We feel that these concepts are what will set us apart from the rest.
Pick & Preserve is not only about supporting the farm to table idea, but it’s also about the journey to know and share the process. Pick & Preserve is preserving a tradition of farming, canning, friendship, and partnership. We strive to keep our product small in batch, locally sourced, and use the best practices with the best ingredients. Check out our friends page to see all of the people involved, and our ingredients page to see our vision. Visit our Website for more information: Pick and Preserve on the web

Ashlie J. Harper

281 Poverty Branch Road

Barnardsville NC, 28709

828.768.8042


Crop Performance in Farming Systems Trial at Rodale Institute

In its 35th year of existence, the Farming Systems Trial (FST) at Rodale Institute continues to demonstrate, through scientific research data, that organic farming is superior to conventional systems with regard to building, maintaining and replenishing the health of the soil. This is the key to regenerative agriculture as it provides the foundation for its present and future growth.
 
FST is America’s longest running, side-by-side comparison of organic and chemical agriculture. It was established in 1981 to study what happens to soil health and agricultural productivity when transitioning from conventional to organic agriculture. Organic agriculture practices result in higher soil organic matter (SOM) contents and, in turn, higher nutrient- and water-supplying potential to crops. Read full report!


Create a Garden Anywhere with Straw Bales

Create a Garden Anywhere with Straw Bales
By Melinda Myers

Add productive garden space and raise your planting bed with straw bale gardening. This technique allows gardeners to create raised bed gardens on a patio, lawn or any area with poor compacted soil. Straw bale gardening has been around for centuries, but thanks to Joel Karsten’s book “Straw Bale Gardens” it has gained new popularity.


Elevated gardens allow gardeners to easily plant herbs, vegetables and flowers anywhere.

Extend the Harvest this Season

Didn’t get enough gardening in this season? Don’t worry there is still time to grow garden-fresh vegetables and herbs this fall and winter.

Purchase transplants and seeds that will grow and flourish in the cooler fall and winter temperatures. Lettuce, spinach, Swiss chard, root vegetables, edible pansies and calendula as well as cole crops, like broccoli, are a few to consider.


Welcome to the Organic Growers School Conference Library

 
Each year, we host over 70 classes and hands on workshops for anyone and everyone with a stake in the local food movement. There are so many classes to choose from that you rarely get to see everything you want. Many of our speakers are kind enough to provide their powerpoints or handouts to be included in our Spring Conference Library. Scroll down to find topics, and click on the class title to download items from that class. Click here for the OGS Library

A Mountain Heritage of Apple Trees

"You ever eaten a Sugarloaf?" he asked. I shook my head. I was a hospice nurse and this gentleman, I’ll call him Zeb, was my patient. We’d been talking about our favorite apples, but this sounded more like a coffeecake. "What about a Sheepnose June?" he tried again. I’d never heard of it.


Asheville, NC Current Weather
52°
light rain
humidity: 87%
wind: 5mph SSW
H 55 • L 48
68°
Tue
76°
Wed
73°
Thu
Weather from OpenWeatherMap