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#Now is the time to help our immigrant neighbors – from Pisgah Legal Services

Fear, uncertainty and isolation. Many of our immigrant neighbors face extraordinary fear, uncertainty and isolation in the midst of a changing approach to immigration policy in our country. Parents are anxious. Children are terrified.

Pisgah Legal Services assists immigrants in WNC through our “Justice For All Project,”– helping eligible immigrants secure work authorization and legal status. We also help immigrants secure food, housing, and safety from abuse.


#GrabYourWallet – Shop These Companies

The #GrabYourWallet boycott on Twitter is one example of an anti-Trump protest that appears to have had significant results. Founded last fall by Shannon Coulter and Sue Atencio, Grab Your Wallet seeks to convince companies to stop selling Trump-branded products through organized boycotts.

Here’s  the list of Trump-free companies to shop.


Racial Justice Coalition Weighs in on Jai Williams Case

On Tuesday, July 5, 2016, representatives from the Racial Justice Coalition (RJC), Asheville-Buncombe Branch of the NAACP, Stop the Violence Coalition, Interdenominational Ministerial Alliance (IMA) Baptist Ministers’ Union, Christians for a United Community (CUC), and the Residents Council of Asheville Housing Authority met with Asheville Police Department Chief Tammy Hooper and members of APD to discuss the tragedy that took place at the Deaverview Apartments, July 2, 2016, resulting in the death of Jai Lateef Soleig Williams. Continue reading


WMC News: New Research on Sexism in Media, Religion, Single Mothers in Malawi, Talking Sex, WMC Live & More

There is agreement among voters that social media followed by cable news and broadcast news are the top places that they see the most sexist treatment of women candidates and elected officials, according to research conducted during the final days of the U.S. presidential election.  Continue reading


Online ‘university of anywhere’ opens to refugees

An online university is offering 500 refugees from Syria’s civil war free places on its degree courses. The University of the People, based in California, is a fast-growing, non-profit project designed to provide higher education for those with the academic ability to study, but without the ability to pay or without any practical access to a traditional university.


Leonard Pitts Jr. – Social Commentary at Its Best

 

Leonard Pitts Jr.  won the 2004 Pulitzer Prize for commentary for his twice-weekly syndicated Miami Herald column, which appears in more than 200 newspapers, and has won numerous other journalism awards. Pitts has a readership in the multi-millions across the country, and his columns generate an average of 2,500 email responses per week.

His books have been widely praised as well. Tavis Smiley called him “the most insightful and inspiring columnist of his generation” in writing about Pitts’ 2009 collection of columns, Forward From This Moment.  Publisher’s Weekly described his 2009 first novel, Before I Forget, as a “rare, memorable debut.”  Visit his website
 
Note: SheVille.org has taken the liberty to have Leonard Pitts reside among our humble pages because we find his perspective, ideas and commentary to be among some of the best. Here are examples – Asheville Citizen-Times

Turn South: Southern Women for Change

Supporting rural Southern women as human rights leaders to end poverty 

Women uniting for change  ~  Women combating sexism, racism, classism  ~ Women tackling inequality

The work is guided by the belief that to truly empower women and end poverty we must build a political culture in the U.S. that promotes and protects human rights.   Visit Turn South: Southern Women for Change


Timeline: Milestones in the American Gay Rights Movement

 December 10, 1924

The Society for Human Rights is founded by Henry Gerber in Chicago. The society is the first gay rights organization as well as the oldest documented in America. After receiving a charter from the state of Illinois, the society publishes the first American publication for homosexuals, Friendship and Freedom. Soon after its founding, the society disbands due to political pressure.   Continue reading


Gwen Ifill’s Profound Impact on African-American Women Journalists

 

Gwen Ifill made it easier for Sonya Ross to cover the White House. She set a great example, provided pointers, and boosted her confidence.

“She blazed a trail,” said Ross, a White House reporter at the Associated Press for nearly seven years who is now AP’s race and ethnicity editor. “She didn’t just teach me how to do it; she showed the world how to do it.”

Indeed, people around the world were stunned by reports of the 61-year-old Ifill’s death from cancer in mid-November—two days before she was to receive the 2016 John Chancellor Award for Excellence in Journalism at Columbia University. Everyone from President Obama to people on the street praised the way in which she protected “the public’s right to know” throughout her career, most recently as moderator and managing editor of Washington Week as well as co-anchor and managing editor of PBS NewsHour. Continue reading


We Wrote a Chapter and Changed the World!

More than 45 years ago, we — the founders of Our Bodies Ourselves — first met to talk about our lives, our health, and our bodies. We had never discussed these intimate issues publicly. We came to believe then, as we do now, that there is no substitute for a small group of women, in the spirit of mutual trust and respect, listening, speaking, and honoring the truth of our own lived experiences.  


African-American History Museum Does Justice to Women

Like a tsunami, the highs and lows of the past rush over visitors to the Smithsonian’s new National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, D.C. It isn’t so much that the information is news to us, but we aren’t used to being hit with so much of it at once.

As one misty-eyed woman visitor put it, “They told it all”—from Black Power to #BlackLivesMatter.

They told the good, the bad, and the downright ugly, but it’s an inspiring kind of sensory overload that makes you want to come back for more. The curators start the story below ground, evoking the feeling of being in the bowels of slave ships that stole our ancestors from Africa. Through a glass wall of a descending elevator, time travels in reverse as the years roll back to the 1400s. 


Grossmutter Comes Flying by Annelinde Metzner

A wind that could tear off shingles

whips over the ridge all night,

leaving a sky clean and blue as an Alpine lake.

The last few leaves cling low to the maple trees,

the newly bare tree tops scraping the sky.

The sound of an ax chopping wood comes up the hollow.

My uncle’s spirit is chopping wood, a chore that’s never done.

The ancient and everyday repetitions of labor-

splitting firewood, canning fruit, patching clothes, knitting hats-

the ancestors nudge us, saying “listen to the wind!”,

reminding us to keep moving, prepare for winter.

No tender admonitions here!

Grossmutter comes flying over the trees in a vision,

braving vast expanses of the sea,

four children, one just a baby, wrapped in her skirts,

my father pushing out from her embrace

to gaze beyond the ship’s deck to the New World.

“Fly!”,she says to me. “What holds you back?

None of us know what that first step will bring.

It is your Grossmutter in the spirit world and I tell you-

the world changes shape with every step you take.

Just go!”

A russet maple leaf lets go, and spins out of sight.

Nana appears.

She has thrown off her rose-colored apron

and put down her wooden spoon.

She is twenty-five, pin curled and all brand new,

eyes opened wide.

“Granddaughter, yes, go! With each step,

the world rearranges itself before you,

a Rubik’s Cube, a house of mirrors.

Take that step! As we live and breathe,

other souls live and breathe too,

and arrange their lives to respond to you.

Step into the dance! The music you call,

and the next, and the next under your gaze will fall.”

At this she spit-polishes her new red shoes,

steps on board the trolley car,

smiles wide at the driver,

and spins off into the skies.

 

Annelinde has three chapbooks of poetry: Isn’t It All of Us? featuring poetry of the world’s peoples; In Love with the Rooted Earth about her relationship with the natural world; and most recently This Most Huge Yes, including poetry of the Goddess and also world topics, written in 2012. Poetry, music, events and items by Annelinde available for sale can be found at her new blog, www.AnnelindesWorld.blogspot.com.

 

 

 

A wind that could tear off shingles

whips over the ridge all night,

leaving a sky clean and blue as an Alpine lake.

The last few leaves cling low to the maple trees,

the newly bare tree tops scraping the sky.

The sound of an ax chopping wood comes up the hollow.

My uncle’s spirit is chopping wood, a chore that’s never done.

The ancient and everyday repetitions of labor-

splitting firewood, canning fruit, patching clothes, knitting hats-

the ancestors nudge us, saying “listen to the wind!”,

reminding us to keep moving, prepare for winter.

No tender admonitions here!

Grossmutter comes flying over the trees in a vision,

braving vast expanses of the sea,

four children, one just a baby, wrapped in her skirts,

my father pushing out from her embrace

to gaze beyond the ship’s deck to the New World.

“Fly!”,she says to me. “What holds you back?

None of us know what that first step will bring.

It is your Grossmutter in the spirit world and I tell you-

the world changes shape with every step you take.

Just go!”

A russet maple leaf lets go, and spins out of sight.

Nana appears.

She has thrown off her rose-colored apron

and put down her wooden spoon.

She is twenty-five, pin curled and all brand new,

eyes opened wide.

“Granddaughter, yes, go! With each step,

the world rearranges itself before you,

a Rubik’s Cube, a house of mirrors.

Take that step! As we live and breathe,

other souls live and breathe too,

and arrange their lives to respond to you.

Step into the dance! The music you call,

and the next, and the next under your gaze will fall.”

At this she spit-polishes her new red shoes,

steps on board the trolley car,

smiles wide at the driver,

and spins off into the skies.


Asheville, NC Current Weather
57°
clear sky
humidity: 66%
wind: 6mph N
H 84 • L 64
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