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The Interfaith Center for Sustainable Development

Uniting for a Sustainable Future

 

Humanity faces unprecedented challenges to sustainable life on the planet. We all share a common purpose. Based in Jerusalem, The Interfaith Center for Sustainable Development (ICSD) unites faith communities, teachers and leaders to promote co-existence, peace, and sustainability through advocacy, education and action-oriented projects. Read more about the Channels of Action here or to see our Theory of Change diagram, please click here.

Working with numerous foundations, private donors, and clients, ICSD has successfully implemented a range of projects from hosting interfaith environmental conferences to facilitating eco tourism in the Holy Land to conducting faith and ecology workshops for students of religion.  Continue Reading


So She Did: The Female Mentor That Changed My Life

I always expected that I’d spend my last summer before starting college binge-watching TV, eating pizza, and dealing with anxiety about my freshman year.  Instead, I ended up exploring my recent acquaintance with the feminist movement through an internship with So She Did, an organization related to women’s empowerment. I decided to join the organization because it seemed like the perfect opportunity to get a different perspective on feminism and my own ideas about empowerment. Sure enough, working there resulted in one of the best and most interesting summers of my life. Continue reading


The Most Undervalued Leadership Traits Of Women

It’s impossible to respect, value and admire great leadership if you can’t identify what makes a leader great.  Because of this, the identity crisis I have written about that exists in today’s workplace is something that women leaders in particular have been facing  for much too long. While the tide is changing and more women are being elevated into leadership roles, there is still much work to do. As of July 2013, there were only 19 female elected presidents and prime ministers in power around the globe.  In the business world, women currently hold only 4.6 percent of Fortune 500 CEO positions and the same percentage of Fortune 1000 CEO positions.   As women continue their upward trajectory in the business world, they have yet to be fully appreciated for the unique qualities and abilities they bring to the workplace. Continue reading


Racism, Sexism and Intersectionality


Women’s Media Center Congratula​tes Co-Founder Gloria Steinem on Presidenti​al Medal of Freedom

The Women’s Media Center proudly congratulates co-founder Gloria Steinem on being named recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom — the nation’s highest civilian honor.

In its announcement, the White House noted that Steinem is “a leader in the women’s liberation movement, co-founded Ms. magazine, and helped launch a wide variety of groups and publications dedicated to advancing civil rights.  Ms. Steinem has received dozens of awards over the course of her career, and remains an active voice for women’s rights.”

Julie Burton, president of The Women’s Media Center, said, “The board and staff at The Women’s Media Center are thrilled that President Barack Obama will present the Presidential Medal of Freedom to our co-founder, Gloria Steinem.  This is a well-deserved honor:  For over four decades, Gloria has struggled for political and social equality and justice. We have come to take it for granted that she will always be where she is most needed, at the podium, on TV, on the plane, phone, or at the computer, to make the ideal of social justice a reality. Her phrases have become the motto of our era. Her activism and fundraising have directly transformed the constitution of Congress and state legislatures. Women are in these places because of the endeavors of Gloria Steinem.

Burton continued, “The history of the women’s movement has been a struggle for women’s voices to be heard. In the tradition of Susan B. Anthony, Sojourner Truth, and Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Gloria has forever changed the 20th and 21st centuries for women and men through her words and actions. Her brilliant writing, tireless advocacy, intelligence and humor have carried and propelled our dreams.  We are so proud that President Obama will honor her with the Presidential Medal of Freedom.”

Steinem is one of 16 recipients who will be honored by Obama at the White House later this year. The medal is “presented to individuals who have made especially meritorious contributions to the security or national interests of the U.S., to world peace, or to cultural or other significant public or private endeavors.”

“I’m honored and touched to receive the Medal of Freedom, especially in the company of Bayard Rustin, Oprah Winfrey, Sally Ride, and other of my heroes,” Steinem said. “I know this is a recognition of the countless women and men who have worked for a society in which we are linked, not ranked, and have always understood that the caste systems based on sex and race, class and sexuality, can only be uprooted together. There is no president from whose hand I would be more honored to receive this than President Obama.”

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the executive order signed by President John F. Kennedy establishing the medal. More than 500 individuals have been awarded the medal.

 “The Presidential Medal of Freedom goes to men and women who have dedicated their own lives to enriching ours,” Obama said in a White House statement issued today. “This year’s honorees have been blessed with extraordinary talent, but what sets them apart is their gift for sharing that talent with the world. It will be my honor to present them with a token of our nation’s gratitude.”

Other honorees announced today include former President Bill Clinton, media mogul Oprah Winfrey, country singer Loretta Lynn, former Washington Post editor Ben Bradlee, baseball star Ernie Banks, former University of North Carolina basketball coach Dean Smith, former Indiana senator Richard Lugar, jazz legend Arturo Sandoval, Nobel Prize winners Daniel Kahnemann and Mario Molina, U.S. Circuit Court chief judge Patricia Wald and civil rights leader C.T. Vivian. Posthumous awards went to astronaut Sally Ride, former Sen. Daniel Inouye and late civil rights activist Bayard Rustin.

The Women’s Media Center works to make women and girls visible and powerful in the media through strategic programs that transform the media landscape, and that include media training, media monitoring and activism, media reports, media programs, and special initiatives.  The Women’s Media Center also produces original media content on our CBS radio show, “Women’s Media Center Live with Robin Morgan,” and publishes Women’s Media Center Features that provide progressive women’s perspectives on both headline stories and timely events. In addition to Steinem and Morgan, the organization was founded in 2005 by Jane Fonda.


For more information, contact Cristal Williams Chancellor, media relations manager, cristal@womensmediacenter.com or 202-587-1636


How to Talk to Little Girls

I went to a dinner party at a friend’s home last weekend, and met her five-year-old daughter for the first time. Little Maya was all curly brown hair, doe-like dark eyes, and adorable in her shiny pink nightgown. I wanted to squeal, “Maya, you’re so cute! Look at you! Turn around and model that pretty ruffled gown, you gorgeous thing!”

But I didn’t. I squelched myself. As I always bite my tongue when I meet little girls, restraining myself from my first impulse, which is to tell them how darn cute/ pretty/ beautiful/ well-dressed/ well-manicured/ well-coiffed they are.

What’s wrong with that? It’s our culture’s standard talking-to-little-girls icebreaker, isn’t it? And why not give them a sincere compliment to boost their self-esteem? Because they are so darling I just want to burst when I meet them, honestly. Continue Reading  (article submitted by Althea Gonzalez)


10 Historic Women Photographers You Should Know

Let’s get our art history on.

Next month, Sotheby’s will bring a broad array of photography to the auction block, illuminating the impressive range of the medium through a survey of Modern and Post-War image makers. While audiences will get their fair share of the men who helped changed the history of photos — think Bill Brandt, Robert Frank, Weegee, Alfred Stieglitz and Ansel Adams — some of the most impressive names in the bunch belong to the 20th and 21st century women who have brought the art of photography to new heights. Continue reading


How ‘benevolent sexism’ drove Dylann Roof’s racist massacre

Before he gunned down a room full of black worshipers, Roof reportedly proclaimed “You rape our women and you’re taking over our country.” Many important things will be said in the next few weeks about the murder of nine people holding a prayer meeting at a historic African American church in Charleston, South Carolina on the evening of June 17.  Click this link to read the entire article  How ‘benevolent sexism’ drove Dylann Roof’s racist massacre  Lisa Wade is an assistant professor of sociology at Occidental College


FACING RACE SPOTLIGHT: Organizer Alicia Garza on Why Black Lives Matter

Alicia Garza calls Oakland home but is one of the many black organizers who’ve flocked to Ferguson, Missouri, in the aftermath of the police killing of 18-year-old Michael Brown. For Garza, who serves as special projects director at the National Domestic Workers Alliance, her presence in Ferguson gave her the opportunity to support local activists as they worked to build sustainable leadership. It was also a chance to put into action a saying that’s become somewhat of a movement slogan in recent months: “Black Lives Matter.”  Continue reading


Ellen Craft, the Slave Who Posed as a Master and Made Herself Free

Ellen Craft, the Slave Who Posed as a Master and Made Herself Free

A few days before Christmas, 1848, a man named William Craft gave his wife Ellen a haircut—in fact, he cut it to the nape of her neck, far shorter than any other woman in Macon, Georgia, where the Crafts lived. They picked out her clothes—a cravat, a top hat, a fine coat—and went over the plan for what felt like the hundredth time.

Ellen was scared. “I think it is almost too much for us to undertake; however, I feel that God is on our side,” she would later write, “and with his assistance, notwithstanding all the difficulties, we shall be able to succeed.” Illustration by Jim Cooke, source image via Getty  Continue reading


Malala Yousafzai at Girl Summit 2014.jpg

Malala Yousafzai – Nobel Peace Prize Winner 2014

Shared Nobel Peace Prize Winner 2014

Malala Yousafzai S.St (Malālah Yūsafzay, Pashto: ملاله یوسفزۍ[məˈlaːlə jusəf ˈzəj];[1] born 12 July 1997) is a Pakistani activist for female education and the youngest-ever Nobel Prize laureate. She is known mainly for human rights advocacy for education and for women in her native Swat Valley in the Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province of northwest Pakistan, where the local Taliban had at times banned girls from attending school. Yousafzai’s advocacy has since grown into an international movement. Continue reading

(Photo: Available free under the terms of Crown Copyright/Open Government License/Creative Commons)


Nuns With a New Creed: Environmentalism

Every woman in this story is confoundingly non-descript. Short hair, often grey. Conservative dress. Unmarried; soft-spoken. Most are well into their seventies, and all will tell you that their way of life is dying out. They will also tell you, with surprising conviction, that the world is in peril.

They are Roman Catholic sisters, from a variety of orders—Dominican, Mercy, Passionist—but don’t think Whoopie Goldberg or a young Sally Field. While many of their aged peers are living out their days in quiet convents, these women are digging gardens and offsetting carbon. They’re as well-versed in solar and geothermal technology as they are in the Gospels of Luke and John, and some wear Carhartts and work boots like they’re habits. At the heart of the women’s action is a belief that the changing climate and world demand a new kind of vocation – that Ave Marias won’t cut it anymore, but maybe clean energy will. Continue reading


IWPR’s New Video Highlights the Impact of Accurate, Credible Research in Improving Policies for Women

 

Earlier this year, the Institute for Women’s Policy Research launched the next 25 years of making research count for women. IWPR’sbrand new video reflects on the original strategic vision of the Institute to change women’s lives through credible, rigorous research, and looks forward to the next era of producing long-term, substantive advancements for women and their families. Watch and share on YouTube now.

IWPR was founded out of a need for an organization whose distinct purpose was to develop comprehensive, women-focused, policy-oriented research. By conducting rigorous analyses using federal data, the social scientists at IWPR shook the assumptions underpinning public debate, replacing rhetoric with reliable research. IWPR’s research has shifted the national conversation on issues such as the gender wage gap, Social Security, welfare and access to public benefits, employment and job discrimination, child care, and many others.  

Of course, this kind of impact cannot be achieved alone. Collaboration and network-building has always been central to IWPR’s mission to produce actionable research. Your partnership and support has been the foundation of the Institute’s first quarter century. We look forward to working with you and sharing our future success in the next 25 years.

Watch and share the video now >>

As the Institute’s first 25 years proves, investing in IWPR results in long-term, substantive advancements for women and their families. But the kind of quality research and analysis that IWPR produces takes time and resources. To help ensure the next 25 years of policymaking is built on credible research on women and families, contribute to IWPR’s general support fund. To learn more about the challenge grant to expand the Mariam K. Chamberlain Fellowship Fund for Women and Public Policy, visit the Mariam K. Chamberlain Fellowship Fund page.


“Words,” we are fond of saying around here, “mean things.”

 

The inference is that those of us in the communications business should not toss the tools of our trade around carelessly; that we should respect their meaning and nuances, and use them precisely to express what we want to say.

That’s why we have copy editors, who serve as the last line of defense against muddled meanings. And it’s why we have stylebooks, which, among other things, delineate the consistency in how certain words and phrases should be employed.

I give you this background as a way of preparing the ground for some familiar words that you will shortly begin seeing used in unfamiliar ways.

The words are “husband” and “wife.” Click here to read the entire article


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