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SHEVILLAGE

This section shares information, tips, stories or ideas about parenting, family life, children, outings and trips, finances, self-care, customs,  stories about cultural heritage and tradition, our furry pet companions and any other aspects of every day experience in Asheville and Western North Carolina.
We remember those who have made a significant contribution to gender equality and women’s lives and well-being. 
Helpmate
OurVoice, Inc.: Domestic Violence
Pet Soup and Brother Wolf Rescue
Animal Compassion Network
Sarge’s Animal Rescue
 

A Movement Without Marches

African American Women and the Politics of Poverty in Postwar Philadelphia

A Movement Without Marches by Lisa Levenstein

2010 Honorable Mention, Frederick Jackson Turner Award, Organization of American Historians

Lisa Levenstein reframes highly charged debates over the origins of chronic African American poverty and the social policies and political struggles that led to the postwar urban crisis. A Movement Without Marches follows poor black women as they traveled from some of Philadelphias most impoverished neighborhoods into its welfare offices, courtrooms, public housing, schools, and hospitals, laying claim to an unprecedented array of government benefits and services. With these resources came new constraints, as public officials frequently responded to womens efforts by limiting benefits and attempting to control their personal lives. Scathing public narratives about women’s “dependency” and their children’s “illegitimacy” placed African American women and public institutions at the center of the growing opposition to black migration and civil rights in northern U.S. cities. Countering stereotypes that have long plagued public debate, Levenstein offers a new paradigm for understanding postwar U.S. history.  Click here for more information

About the Author

Lisa Levenstein is associate professor of history at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro.


Addressing the Prevalence of Eating Disorders through Fiction

Before I Disappear, by Barb Herding, chronicles the story of Lauren Stafford, a 16 year old girl whose self-esteem has been crushed by rejection from everyone in her life.  Lauren develops a skewed perception of her body as a result of the rejection that she experiences, which turns into an eating disorder.

When her eating disorder spirals out of control and she is rushed to the hospital, Lauren meets other teens who are suffering from the same problems, and she sees that she is not alone and just how many different types of people are affected by the same affliction. As she is introduced to both males and females, she learns about teenagers from all walks of life who are internalizing different types of pressure.  In group therapy, she meets Bridget, a ballerina who collapsed during her solo in The Nutcracker, Paul who should be fighting in his first championship wrestling match, and Vivian, a model who never made it to her first real photo shoot.  Then there is Jenny, who does not want to tell her story to the group, as her eating disorder and near fatal episode result from a dark secret rooted in her childhood.

According to the Palo Alto Medical Foundation, approximately one percent of adolescent girls develop anorexia nervosa and another two to three percent develop bulimia nervosa.  Alarmingly, one out of every ten anorexia cases is fatal, resulting from starvation, cardiac arrest, suicide, or other related medical complications.

Herding’s story provides an important message about eating disorders, their potential consequences, and the road to recovery, addressing an issue that is prevalent in our society through fiction.  Before I Disappear is a heart-rending story that is certain to tug at the emotions of its readers, provide teens with an important message about eating disorders, and help parents to understand their teenagers who suffer from eating disorders.
Contact: Emily – emily@bookstandpublishing.com


New Girl Scouts Research Exposes the Impact of Reality TV on Girls

As reality TV has become staple entertainment for young people and adults alike, tween and teen girls who regularly view reality TV accept and expect a higher level of drama, aggression, and bullying in their own lives, and measure their worth primarily by their physical appearance, according to Real to Me: Girls and Reality TV, a national survey released today by the Girl Scout Research Institute.


“Femicide”—The Power of a Name

Sociologist Diana Russell has organized for decades to end violence against women. Here she argues that labeling the most extreme form of such violence is essential to combating it.

Public awareness about violence against women has increased dramatically over the last four decades in the United States, thanks to women’s multi-faceted activism. Click here to read the entire article


SheVille Values & Mission

Our Values

We value and have as our guiding principles the feminist ideals of diversity, creativity, balance, collaboration, compassion, sustainability, and environmental preservation that challenge greed, exploitation, disrespect and domination.

Our Mission 

  • to counter attitudes and actions that support racism, sexism, misogyny and xenophobia
  • to counter information that encourages or disregards environmental abuse and waste
  • to feature those elements of community that energize, inspire and encourage diversity and  collaboration
  • to provide a safe and supportive web environment for our readers, advertisers and contributors
  • to provide our readers with a current resource about local and regional people and events,  women’s lives, education and health, the arts and arts education, sustainability and the environment 
  • to promote and give affordable visibility to local and regional entrepreneurs, educators, farmers, artists and writers

We provide local, regional, national and international information about women’s lives and education, regional performing and visual arts and writing, the environment, green living and sustainability and regional Western North Carolina businesses, people and events.

SheVille.org of Western North Carolina is a one-of-a-kind women’s online, community magazine for EVERYONE.  Contact Jean or Rain at (828)215-2915 or info@sheville.org


Diabetes – by Melissa Hicks M.D. of MAHEC Family Health Center

Diabetes has gotten lots more press lately, as it relates to health in general, and the increasing issue of other health related developments, such as obesity. For the purpose of this writing, Diabetes or Diabetes Mellitus will refer to the “Adult onset” or commonly known “Type II” Diabetes, usually diagnosed in adulthood (also more and more young adult/teens, too). 

  


Enrich Your Life by Living Gratefully!

Enrich Your Life by Living Gratefully!

By Rabbi Rami 

 What are you grateful for? Try not to cough up the usual suspects: sunsets, daisies, puppies, babies, and babies playing with puppies among the daisies at sunset. True, I’m grateful that the earth orbits the sun, and I love dogs and babies, but being grateful for these things is too easy. Being grateful requires more than warm fuzzy feelings; it requires clear seeing and right action.

 Not long ago a woman shared with me her experience as a lung transplant recipient. She was grateful to the organ donor, and the doctors and nurses who performed the operation. What about the drunk driver who killed the woman whose lung saved her life, I asked; was she grateful to him as well?

 She just stared at me. No one had asked her that before. To her credit, she closed her eyes, took a moment to see what was true for her, and said, yes she was grateful to the man who killed her donor and thus saved her life. Then her eyes filled with tears, and said, “And I hate myself for that.”

As we talked she realized that it wasn’t self-hate she was feeling but extreme humility. After all, she neither wished the death of her donor nor did anything to cause it; she simply benefited from this tragedy. But that realization was huge. What if the deceased woman had a family, she mused. What if she had little children who would grow up without a mom? What if she was caring for her parents? A single death can have so many ramifications. How do I live with this, she sobbed.

 Your situation may not be this extreme, but the question she asked is your question as well. You are being gifted by people and things all the time. How do you live with this? This is what gratitude is really all about: not feeling grateful, but living gratefully.

 Chances are you too have lungs, and don’t need a transplant to be grateful for them. But what about the Brazilian rainforest? Are you grateful for that? After all, your lungs are useless without oxygen, yet neither they nor any other organ in your body produces oxygen. Trees and plants in partnership with the sun do that, and the Brazilian rainforest processes 28% of the world’s oxygen, so the forest is a vital part of your body as well. If you are grateful to your lungs, you must be grateful to trees and plants as well. How do you express your gratitude? What do you do to help secure clean air for your lungs to breathe?

 Despite clichés to the contrary, it isn’t the thought that counts; it is the deed that counts. Gratitude that is merely attitude is cheap and meaningless. If you are grateful to your lungs, don’t poison them with carcinogens. If you are grateful for oxygen, protect the living system that produces it. Or, if you don’t, at least have the courage to stop claiming you are grateful for lungs and oxygen.

 * * *

 I wear Rockport shoes and return them to the company for resoling. The first time I did this the shoes came back in near mint condition accompanied by a hand-written note from the person who restored them. He explained how very disappointed he was that I disrespected the shoes he works so hard to make: the leather was scuffed and unpolished; the shoe backs were broken; and the toe box was misshapen because I didn’t keep my shoes on a shoetree. He concluded by asking me to treat his work with more respect.

 That was 30 years ago, and I have never treated my shoes the same since. What about you? You would be lost without your shoes. They support your arches, protect your feet from hot pavements and dangerous debris, and (along with your shirt) allow you to eat in restaurants. So how do you show your gratitude? Look at your shoes and see.

 What about the rest of your clothes? Do you keep them clean, neatly folded or hanging properly? When you no longer need them, do you toss them out or do you donate them where someone else can benefit from them?

 What is true of shoes and clothes is true of everything. It is easy to assess the quality of gratitude in your life by examining how well you treat the people and things in your life. You are being gifted by people and things—seen and unseen, known and unknown—all day, every day. That should make you feel grateful, but more importantly it should cause you to live gratefully.

 Living gratefully means taking nothing and no one for granted. It means treating salespeople, stock clerks, bank tellers, and cashiers kindly. It means not polluting your body with excess sugar, fat, and salt. It means not polluting your community with bigotry, fear, anger, gossip, and ill-will. It means saying thank you to everyone and everything by treating them all with utmost respect.

 Be grateful for babies and puppies, just don’t stop there. Join with others to offer a scholarship at a local daycare center, adopt or rescue an animal companion, or support a local animal shelter. Gratitude is not a way of feeling, it is a way of doing. If you aren’t living gratefully, feeling grateful means nothing at all.

 ###

Rabbi Rami Shapiro, PhD teaches religious studies at Middle Tennessee State University and is the director of Wisdom House Center for Interfaith Studies in Nashville. He has written over two dozen books and a new series, Rabbi Rami Guides: Roadside Assistance for the Spiritual Traveler, available at Spirituality & Health Books and Amazon.com; see www.rabbirami.com.   SMITH PUBLICITY, INC.  856-489-8654 x326


Diabetes and Chinese Medicine

Diabetes is one of the few diseases in western medicine that was discussed in ancient Chinese medical literature. Over the last 2000 years, many Chinese herbs and acupuncture points have been identified for its treatment, and it is fairly common for diabetic patients in China to use Chinese medicine alone with satisfactory results. In the West, diabetes is seldom the main reason for a visit to the Chinese medical practitioner, who from time to time may see people with secondary manifestations of the disease such as limb numbness and pain. In most cases, diabetes is only mentioned in passing in the patient’s health profile.


The Nobel Prize and The African Woman -Score Two for Peace

Three women are sharing the 2011 Nobel Prize for Peace. One is Yemeni human rights leader Tawakul Karman. The other two are African: Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf, Liberia’s current president and Africa’s only female democratically elected head of state, and her countrywoman Leymah Gbowee who is a peace activist and spellbinding challenger of the ultra-male, brutality-wielding world of warlords.


Keywords

What are keywords, and why do you need to bother?

Keywords can be practically any word that you put up on your website except the grammatical articles and other connector words. The reason that you care is that keywords determine how people can find things on the web.

When you google something, what do you do? Suppose you live in Hendersonville, and you need a plumber. On your search screen, you type “Hendersonville plumbers.” Those are keywords. Hopefully, you then get a list of plumbers, and you then take the search wherever you need to next. But how did those businesses end up on the Google search in the first place?

When a webpage is designed and published, almost any word on that site can be catalogued by a search engine. The problem is, there may be one million websites that have the word “plumber” on them. These days, a single keyword is not enough. When people are searching for businesses, they almost always do what I described above: they type in the name of the type of business and the location where they want the service. Thus, your website needs to have both of these words prominent in text. A graphic only doesn’t do you any good at all.

A few years ago, I was doing optiimizing for a site here where they had a really nice graphic which included a logo, the address and the phone number. The problem was, the name “Asheville” wasn’t featured at all on the page. When I simply changed every page to include a tag line about proudly serving Asheville and Western North Carolina and making no other change, the Google listing went from page 29 to page 6. That’s how important the city/region keyword can be.

The more you repeat the primary keywords, the more search engines “get it” that this is your primary business.

 

 

 


Information and Links on Nuclear Waste Policy

Here are useful resources:

Mt Protectors Campaign: www.nonuclearwasteinwnc.com

On Facebook: a group – Mountain Protectors Action Alliance

Nuclear Information and Resource Service – www.nirs.org

Join the NIRS “ACTION ALERT LIST” –

see recent Alerts here: http://org2.democracyinaction.org/o/5502/blastContent.jsp

Join the list here: http://www.nirs.org/about/list.htm

 Limited messages – each with an ACTION (email link to press, or call to make with the phone number and talking points)

 

Radiation – why this waste matters to you!

http://www.nirs.org/radiation/radiationhome.htm

FACT SHEETS — http://www.nirs.org/factsheets/fctsht.htm/#radiation  (radioactive waste, radiation, nuclear reactors)

 

National Nuclear Waste Policy

The Secretary of Energy’s Blue Ribbon Commission on America’s Nuclear Future: www.brc.gov

Grassroots activist response to BRC research questions: http://www.nirs.org/radwaste/policy/policyhome.htm

KEEP IT WHERE IT IS FOR NOW POLICY: http://www.psr.org/nuclear-bailout/resources/principles-for-safeguarding.pdf

 

Info on Nuclear Transports in WNC

Reports by formerly active group “Common Sense at the Nuclear Crossroads” – www.nuclearcrossroads.com

Series of articles on so-called “low-level” waste transports: http://www.michaelhopping.com/features/featuresindex.html

Recent CLEAR CHANNEL Radio interview on the issue: http://www.wwnc.com/cc-common/podcast/single_page.html?podcast=Changes

Our Southern Community radio archive of Green drinks presentation on both Fukushima accident (this event was in March) and also waste policy — http://oursoutherncommunity.org/media/2011/AshevilleGreenDrink.mp3

Terrific graphic comparing new nuke to energy upgrades for houses – 90 TIMES more jobs and ½ the cash outlay to save as much as the nuke would make!

http://theenergycollective.com/petertroast/61269/infographic-nuclear-power-vs-energy-efficient-homes?utm_source=tec_newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=newsletter

 

Mary Olson

Nuclear Information and Resource Service

Southeast Office  *  PO Box 7586  Asheville, NC  28802

maryo@nirs.org     www.nirs.org

828-252-8409     cell 828-242-5621

 

“Until we know how to safely dispose of the radioactive materials generated by nuclear plants, we should postpone these activities so as not to cause further harm to future generations. To do otherwise is simply an immoral act, and that is my belief, both as a scientist and as a survivor of the Hiroshima atomic bombing.”

— Dr Shoji Sawada


Saudi Women to Subaru: Stop Selling Cars Where Women Can’t Drive Them

***PRESS RELEASE***

Saudi Women to Subaru: Stop Selling Cars Where Women Can’t Drive Them

Saudi activists call on Subaru, which markets heavily to women, to pull out of Saudi Arabia until women get the right to drive; Change.org campaign already attracting 1,000 signatures an hour.
 
RIYADH, SAUDI ARABIA – More than 1,000 people an hour are signing a new viral Change.org campaign created by a coalition of leading Saudi Arabian women’s rights activists calling on Subaru to stop selling cars in the oil-rich kingdom until a ban on women driving is lifted.

Saudi Women for Driving, a coalition of leading Saudi women’s rights activists, bloggers and academics campaigning for the right to drive, sent an open letter today to the senior management of the Japanese transportation conglomerate Fuji Heavy Industries, which owns Subaru.

“While Subaru is marketed heavily at women, your company is simultaneously making hundreds of millions selling your cars in the only country on earth where women aren’t allowed to drive,” the Saudi women’s coalition wrote to the car manufacturer. “We write to you with a simple request: that Subaru publicly pledge to pull out of Saudi Arabia until such time as women are allowed to drive.”

Saudi Women for Driving plans to launch similar campaigns against a number of other car companies, but decided to target Subaru first due to the company’s heavy marketing of the Subaru brand to women.

Within hours of the campaign’s launch, Saudi Women for Driving had recruited more than 5,000 supporters on Change.org, the world’s fastest growing platform for social change.

“It’s still early, but recruiting 1,000 supporters an hour while the U.S. is sleeping is an unprecedented level of growth for a campaign,” said Change.org’s Human Rights Editor Benjamin Joffe-Walt. “The amount of momentum these Saudi women have managed to build in one month is incredible: first they successfully mobilized more than 70,000 people to help a Saudi mother arrested for driving her own car, then they successfully led a month-long campaign to get the United States’ top diplomat to publicly stand with them, and now they are taking on their most ambitious campaign yet. I can’t wait to see what happens next.”

The Saudi women’s Subaru campaign follows a significant victory for Saudi women’s rights’ activists. Saudi Women for Driving recently called on Secretary of State Hillary Clinton to publicly support their right to drive. Her spokesperson responded, and said Clinton was doing so through “quiet diplomacy.” But Saudi women pushed back on that approach, launching a massive Change.org campaign to convince Clinton to reconsider and telling the secretary of state yesterday that “quiet diplomacy is not what we need right now.” At a press conference two hours later, the top U.S. diplomat publicly declared her support for the Saudi women’s right to drive campaigns, calling them “brave”.

Saudi Women for Driving is an informal consortium of Saudi women’s rights activists pulled together after the arrest of Manal al-Sharif, a Saudi mother jailed for driving her car. The group seeks to use online campaigning to build international support for Saudi women’s right to drive. More than 100,000 people in 156 countries have joined Saudi Women for Driving campaigns on Change.org.


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