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SHEVILLAGE

This section shares information, tips, stories or ideas about parenting, family life, children, outings and trips, finances, self-care, customs,  stories about cultural heritage and tradition, our furry pet companions and any other aspects of every day experience in Asheville and Western North Carolina.
We remember those who have made a significant contribution to gender equality and women’s lives and well-being. 
Helpmate
OurVoice, Inc.: Domestic Violence
Pet Soup and Brother Wolf Rescue
Animal Compassion Network
Sarge’s Animal Rescue
 

Are You Bear Smart? Living Responsibly in Bear Country

Wednesday, May 30  Socializing: 5:30PM Programming: 6:00PM

Location: Posana Cafe, 1 Biltmore Avenue, Asheville, NC 28801

If you live in WNC, you have probably seen a bear in the wild while hiking and you might have encountered one in you own backyard. Bear have even been spotted in downtown Asheville!

Asheville Green Drinks will team up with the Bear Education and Resources Task Force (B.E.A.R) of the Western North Carolina Alliance for a bear preparedness program.  Come out to learn more about how to keep bear out of your trashcans and how to stay safe in the wild.

Presenter Debbie Lassiter will host this free program to share practical advice on living responsibly in bear country and reducing human/bear conflicts.

Socializing: 5:30PM Programming: 6:00PM

Location: Posana Cafe, 1 Biltmore Avenue, Asheville, NC 28801 (directions)

Thank you to our weekly host and sponsor Posana Cafe, a 3-star certified Green Restaurant! We encourage you to support their efforts by ordering drinks and/or food at Green Drinks’ programs. Just make sure to tip your server or bartender and come a little early if ordering food.

Join Posana for lunch Tuesday through Friday 11am – 3 pm, Weekend Brunch, Saturday & Sunday 9am – 3pm and Dinner Tuesday through Sunday 5 pm – 9 pm.  You can visit their menu online and view lunch, dinner, weekend brunch and dessert offerings.


WMC Feature: Misogynistic Ads and the Oxygen of Publicity

Retro-sexist advertising may be presented as ironic, but it features the same, familiar images feminists rallied against decades ago, argues the author. What to do?

Compare two advertisements—both use a picture of a young, attractive, white woman to sell their product. Both women look sweetly perplexed and nervous. One, for the Mini Automatic, is taglined “For Simple Driving” and shows the model clutching a steering wheel and biting her lip, daunted at the task of driving a car. The other, for a Samsung camera, is taglined “Too Smart For Amy” with its model holding up the product and pouting adorably, eyes wide with confusion to show she is completely flummoxed by this complex piece of technology. Can you guess which one was made in 1970 and which one was released in 2012? Me neither.  Click here to read the entire article


Sex, lies and media: New wave of activists challenge notions of beauty

Here’s the fantasy: A half-naked woman lies across a couch, lips pouty and cleavage prominent as her sultry gaze implores you to buy this bottle of perfume.The reality: Women make up 51% of the United States yet only 17% of seats in the House of Representatives. They’re 3% of Fortune 500 CEOs and 7% of directors in the top 250 grossing films.  Click here to read the entire article


What Did Egyptian Women Gain from Arab Spring Uprising?

Sherine Hafez and Jessica Winegar examine the role and future of Egyptian women in the Arab Spring Uprising in this quarter’s American Ethnologist by authoring personal accounts of women during the revolution. From the thicket of peaceful protest in Tahrir Square to tending to the domestic duties during such an uncertain time, many obstacles have challenged the role of women in politics.

Jessica Winegar, sociocultural anthropologist and Assistant Professor at Northwestern University, examines the responsibilities of women during the uprising. Professor Winegar was in Cairo during the uprising, however, like many women, she could not attend the protest due to family obligations in the home. “I call attention to the way that revolution is experienced and undertaken in domestic spaces, through different forms of affect, in ways deeply inflected by gender and class,” says Winegar in her article The Privilege of Revolution: Gender, class, space, and affect in Egypt.

Sherine Hafez, ethnographer and Assistant Professor at the University of California Riverside, takes an in-depth look at the role of women after the uprising to surprisingly find this role remains the same, in her article No Longer a Bargain: Women, Masculinity, and the Egyptian Uprising. She notes that “what the events of this uprising have revealed is that notions of masculinity undermined by a repressive regime have observably shifted the terms of the patriarchal bargain.”


American Ethnologist
, a quarterly journal produced by the American Ethnological Society (AES), in its February 2012 issue features these articles on the Arab Spring uprising in Egypt. The nine authors are anthropologists with a wide range of specialties who have years of research experience in Egypt. The online and print editions are currently available. Articles and abstracts are available at www.americanethnologist.org

This journal is edited by Angelique Haugerud of Rutgers University and its content deals with all facets of ethnology in the broadest sense of the term. Articles creatively demonstrate the connections between ethnographic specificity and theoretical originality, as well as the ongoing relevance of the ethnographic imagination to the contemporary world.

The American Ethnological Society, founded in 1842, sponsors the journal American Ethnologist. AES is a section of the American Anthropological Association.

-American Anthropological Association-
Founded in 1902, the American Anthropological Association is the world’s largest professional organization of anthropologists and others interested in anthropology, with an average annual membership of more than 10,000. The Arlington, VA – based association represents all specialties within anthropology – cultural anthropology, biological (or physical) anthropology, archaeology, linguistics and applied anthropology.

Media Resources:
American Ethnologist:  www.americanethnologist.org

AE Online Issue:  http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/amet.2012.39.issue-1/issuetoc

Sherine Hafez:  http://bit.ly/z30gq3

Jessica Winegar:  http://bit.ly/AiiQ2E

Angelique Haugerud, Editor, American Ethnologist:  http://bit.ly/wEByYO

American Ethnologist Society:  www.aesonline.org

Contact:
Joslyn Osten, Marketing and Public Relations Manager
American Anthropological Association, 2200 Wilson Blvd., Suite 600, Arlington, VA 22201-3357
(T) 703/528-1902 x1171, (F) 703/528-3546, josten@aaanet.org


Diabetes – by Melissa Hicks M.D. of MAHEC Family Health Center

Diabetes has gotten lots more press lately, as it relates to health in general, and the increasing issue of other health related developments, such as obesity. For the purpose of this writing, Diabetes or Diabetes Mellitus will refer to the “Adult onset” or commonly known “Type II” Diabetes, usually diagnosed in adulthood (also more and more young adult/teens, too). 

  


Enrich Your Life by Living Gratefully!

Enrich Your Life by Living Gratefully!

By Rabbi Rami 

 What are you grateful for? Try not to cough up the usual suspects: sunsets, daisies, puppies, babies, and babies playing with puppies among the daisies at sunset. True, I’m grateful that the earth orbits the sun, and I love dogs and babies, but being grateful for these things is too easy. Being grateful requires more than warm fuzzy feelings; it requires clear seeing and right action.

 Not long ago a woman shared with me her experience as a lung transplant recipient. She was grateful to the organ donor, and the doctors and nurses who performed the operation. What about the drunk driver who killed the woman whose lung saved her life, I asked; was she grateful to him as well?

 She just stared at me. No one had asked her that before. To her credit, she closed her eyes, took a moment to see what was true for her, and said, yes she was grateful to the man who killed her donor and thus saved her life. Then her eyes filled with tears, and said, “And I hate myself for that.”

As we talked she realized that it wasn’t self-hate she was feeling but extreme humility. After all, she neither wished the death of her donor nor did anything to cause it; she simply benefited from this tragedy. But that realization was huge. What if the deceased woman had a family, she mused. What if she had little children who would grow up without a mom? What if she was caring for her parents? A single death can have so many ramifications. How do I live with this, she sobbed.

 Your situation may not be this extreme, but the question she asked is your question as well. You are being gifted by people and things all the time. How do you live with this? This is what gratitude is really all about: not feeling grateful, but living gratefully.

 Chances are you too have lungs, and don’t need a transplant to be grateful for them. But what about the Brazilian rainforest? Are you grateful for that? After all, your lungs are useless without oxygen, yet neither they nor any other organ in your body produces oxygen. Trees and plants in partnership with the sun do that, and the Brazilian rainforest processes 28% of the world’s oxygen, so the forest is a vital part of your body as well. If you are grateful to your lungs, you must be grateful to trees and plants as well. How do you express your gratitude? What do you do to help secure clean air for your lungs to breathe?

 Despite clichés to the contrary, it isn’t the thought that counts; it is the deed that counts. Gratitude that is merely attitude is cheap and meaningless. If you are grateful to your lungs, don’t poison them with carcinogens. If you are grateful for oxygen, protect the living system that produces it. Or, if you don’t, at least have the courage to stop claiming you are grateful for lungs and oxygen.

 * * *

 I wear Rockport shoes and return them to the company for resoling. The first time I did this the shoes came back in near mint condition accompanied by a hand-written note from the person who restored them. He explained how very disappointed he was that I disrespected the shoes he works so hard to make: the leather was scuffed and unpolished; the shoe backs were broken; and the toe box was misshapen because I didn’t keep my shoes on a shoetree. He concluded by asking me to treat his work with more respect.

 That was 30 years ago, and I have never treated my shoes the same since. What about you? You would be lost without your shoes. They support your arches, protect your feet from hot pavements and dangerous debris, and (along with your shirt) allow you to eat in restaurants. So how do you show your gratitude? Look at your shoes and see.

 What about the rest of your clothes? Do you keep them clean, neatly folded or hanging properly? When you no longer need them, do you toss them out or do you donate them where someone else can benefit from them?

 What is true of shoes and clothes is true of everything. It is easy to assess the quality of gratitude in your life by examining how well you treat the people and things in your life. You are being gifted by people and things—seen and unseen, known and unknown—all day, every day. That should make you feel grateful, but more importantly it should cause you to live gratefully.

 Living gratefully means taking nothing and no one for granted. It means treating salespeople, stock clerks, bank tellers, and cashiers kindly. It means not polluting your body with excess sugar, fat, and salt. It means not polluting your community with bigotry, fear, anger, gossip, and ill-will. It means saying thank you to everyone and everything by treating them all with utmost respect.

 Be grateful for babies and puppies, just don’t stop there. Join with others to offer a scholarship at a local daycare center, adopt or rescue an animal companion, or support a local animal shelter. Gratitude is not a way of feeling, it is a way of doing. If you aren’t living gratefully, feeling grateful means nothing at all.

 ###

Rabbi Rami Shapiro, PhD teaches religious studies at Middle Tennessee State University and is the director of Wisdom House Center for Interfaith Studies in Nashville. He has written over two dozen books and a new series, Rabbi Rami Guides: Roadside Assistance for the Spiritual Traveler, available at Spirituality & Health Books and Amazon.com; see www.rabbirami.com.   SMITH PUBLICITY, INC.  856-489-8654 x326


Diabetes and Chinese Medicine

Diabetes is one of the few diseases in western medicine that was discussed in ancient Chinese medical literature. Over the last 2000 years, many Chinese herbs and acupuncture points have been identified for its treatment, and it is fairly common for diabetic patients in China to use Chinese medicine alone with satisfactory results. In the West, diabetes is seldom the main reason for a visit to the Chinese medical practitioner, who from time to time may see people with secondary manifestations of the disease such as limb numbness and pain. In most cases, diabetes is only mentioned in passing in the patient’s health profile.


The Listening Project – National and International

A Listening Project (LP) is a comprehensive process that includes deep listening interviews and community organizing that can result in cooperative community education and action on a wide range of issues and concerns. LPs are especially useful in communities where conflict, divisions or disempowerment weakens efforts for positive change. They can help organizations successfully address injustice, conflict, community development, health, environmental and others concerns.

What It Does

  • Identifies problems and issues that people care about.

  • Includes often unheard or unheeded voices.

  • Fosters emergence and development of new community leaders.

  • Generates creative solutions for community needs and problems.

  • Disseminates issue-related information and determines needs for additional information.

  • Encourages personal growth as all involved consider new viewpoints and information.

  • Forms uncommon coalitions and alliances through which diverse viewpoints can resolve – rather than clash over – difficult issues.

  • Promotes insight, empathy, and understanding among people with conflicting views.

  • Creates long-term capacity for grassroots community building.  Click here to read more


Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) – Integral Part of Public Safety

VAWA INTEGRAL PART OF PUBLIC SAFETY AND NEEDS TO PASS, SAYS American Bar Association
Good Work of Local Providers Needs Reauthorization to Continue

WASHINGTON, D.C., April 26, 2012 — Calling the bill the single most effective federal effort to respond to domestic violence and sexual assault, American Bar Association President Wm. T. (Bill) Robinson III urged senators to support S. 1925, the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2011, in a letter sent to Capitol Hill today.

“S. 1925 was carefully crafted to reflect discussions with more than 2,000 advocates and experts around the country,” noted Robinson.  He further explained that the association adopted policy in February 2010 urging for adoption of legislation that provides services, protections and justice to vulnerable victims “including children and youth who are victims or are witnesses to family violence, and victims who are disabled, elderly, immigrant, trafficked, LGBT and/or Indian.”

Robinson urged senators to oppose amendments that would weaken the bill, including a substitute version being offered by Sens. Charles Grassley and Kay Bailey Hutchison.  The letter also emphasized the ABA’s opposition to mandatory minimum sentencing proposals either to accompany new federal crimes or to augment existing offenses.

“VAWA has become an integral part of our public safety strategy that has empirical support for its effectiveness,” summed Robinson.  “The good work being done by thousands of local providers and public servants cannot continue without its reauthorization.”

The letter in its entirety can be found online.

With nearly 400,000 members, the American Bar Association is the largest voluntary professional membership organization in the world.  As the national voice of the legal profession, the ABA works to improve the administration of justice, promotes programs that assist lawyers and judges in their work, accredits law schools, provides continuing legal education, and works to build public understanding around the world of the importance of the rule of law.

This distribution list is a service to the news media from the American Bar Association Communications and Media Relations Division.  Your e-mail address will only be used within the ABA and its entities.  We do not sell or rent e-mail addresses to anyone outside the ABA.  To change your e-mail listing or to be removed from our distribution lists, please contact the CMR Division at 202-662-1090 or abanews@americanbar.org.

Contact:            Patricia Gaul
Phone:              202/662-1094
Online:              Read the entire article


Join Me on the Bridge! International Women’s Day…all year long

Rwanda and Congo are two neighbouring countries that have been torn apart by the worst atrocities of war that the world has seen in recent years. The rape and torture of women as a weapon of war is commonplace.The women from the opposing sides of war in these communities came together to say No to war and Yes to peace, and to show how they could build the bridges of peace for the future. To show their support, women have stood with them on hundreds of bridges across the world from Sydney to Paris, and Accra to Ontario.  Click here “to build bridges of peace and hope for the future” If not this year what about next year?  Write SheVille if you are interested!    info@sheville.org




Women Who Shaped America

The Women’s Rights Movement would not have been what it was — and still is — without Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony. During an era in which women were thought to be their husband’s property, Stanton and Anthony challenged the notion that women were not equal. America saw drastic change in civil rights in the 19th century, when freed slaves had been given the right to vote. Women, on the other hand, did not have the right to vote, or rights in a divorce, or the right to have custody of their children, or a fair share of their property. Click here to read the entire article

This article was contributed to SheVille by Alison Fitzpatrick


A Movement Without Marches

African American Women and the Politics of Poverty in Postwar Philadelphia

A Movement Without Marches by Lisa Levenstein

2010 Honorable Mention, Frederick Jackson Turner Award, Organization of American Historians

Lisa Levenstein reframes highly charged debates over the origins of chronic African American poverty and the social policies and political struggles that led to the postwar urban crisis. A Movement Without Marches follows poor black women as they traveled from some of Philadelphias most impoverished neighborhoods into its welfare offices, courtrooms, public housing, schools, and hospitals, laying claim to an unprecedented array of government benefits and services. With these resources came new constraints, as public officials frequently responded to womens efforts by limiting benefits and attempting to control their personal lives. Scathing public narratives about women’s “dependency” and their children’s “illegitimacy” placed African American women and public institutions at the center of the growing opposition to black migration and civil rights in northern U.S. cities. Countering stereotypes that have long plagued public debate, Levenstein offers a new paradigm for understanding postwar U.S. history.  Click here for more information

About the Author

Lisa Levenstein is associate professor of history at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro.


Addressing the Prevalence of Eating Disorders through Fiction

Before I Disappear, by Barb Herding, chronicles the story of Lauren Stafford, a 16 year old girl whose self-esteem has been crushed by rejection from everyone in her life.  Lauren develops a skewed perception of her body as a result of the rejection that she experiences, which turns into an eating disorder.

When her eating disorder spirals out of control and she is rushed to the hospital, Lauren meets other teens who are suffering from the same problems, and she sees that she is not alone and just how many different types of people are affected by the same affliction. As she is introduced to both males and females, she learns about teenagers from all walks of life who are internalizing different types of pressure.  In group therapy, she meets Bridget, a ballerina who collapsed during her solo in The Nutcracker, Paul who should be fighting in his first championship wrestling match, and Vivian, a model who never made it to her first real photo shoot.  Then there is Jenny, who does not want to tell her story to the group, as her eating disorder and near fatal episode result from a dark secret rooted in her childhood.

According to the Palo Alto Medical Foundation, approximately one percent of adolescent girls develop anorexia nervosa and another two to three percent develop bulimia nervosa.  Alarmingly, one out of every ten anorexia cases is fatal, resulting from starvation, cardiac arrest, suicide, or other related medical complications.

Herding’s story provides an important message about eating disorders, their potential consequences, and the road to recovery, addressing an issue that is prevalent in our society through fiction.  Before I Disappear is a heart-rending story that is certain to tug at the emotions of its readers, provide teens with an important message about eating disorders, and help parents to understand their teenagers who suffer from eating disorders.
Contact: Emily – emily@bookstandpublishing.com


New Girl Scouts Research Exposes the Impact of Reality TV on Girls

As reality TV has become staple entertainment for young people and adults alike, tween and teen girls who regularly view reality TV accept and expect a higher level of drama, aggression, and bullying in their own lives, and measure their worth primarily by their physical appearance, according to Real to Me: Girls and Reality TV, a national survey released today by the Girl Scout Research Institute.


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