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SHEVILLAGE

Here’s a compilation of some of the fabulous, year-round fairs, festival offerings and stuff to do that the Western North Carolina region has to offer. Festival organizers: please contact: info@sheville.org if you wish to be considered for inclusion into SheVille of WNC.
Outdoor Adventures     Hot Springs Natural Hot Mineral Waters     Chimney Rock Park     History at Hand     North Carolina Festivals     Explore Asheville Events Calendar     Asheville Herb Festival

 

Dr. Maya Angelou Shares Wisdom and Inspiration in an Interview with Women For One

In an interview with Women For One, celebrated author and poet, Dr. Maya Angelou speaks about peace and authenticity.

One of the most incredibly inspiring and powerful women in history, celebrated author and poet Dr. Maya Angelou spoke with Women For One about what it means to be truly authentic. Dr. Angelou was a primary inspiration for the creation of Women For One; her stories and vision encourage others to share their stories with each other in the Women For One community. Just as in her own writing, Angelou hopes other women will also connect with readers in an authentic and human way. The trick, she notes, is to tell stories in the most truthful way possible.

Angelou started her artistic career at a young age and in 1969, her work “I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings”, earned her a reputation as a new kind of autobiographer. She was one of the first African-American women who could write about her life “from the inside” without apology. Her bravery in writing about her life makes her an inspiring example of the authenticity found in storytelling. Angelou has touched audiences worldwide and earned her several awards for her work including a Pulitzer, and is the second poet in history to be invited to compose a piece of work for a presidential inauguration. In addition, she has played many roles – mother, celebrated poet, memoirist and novelist, dramatist, actress, historian, filmmaker, civil rights activist, and noted professor with over thirty honorary degrees. She is currently the Reynolds Professor of American Studies at Wake Forest University.

In the interview, Angelou says that it’s up to women to work together to change the world around them, and bring peace both to themselves and their communities. She cites negativity as vulgarity, and explains how that negativity keeps women from truly being authentic. Her exemplary kindness and authentic truth-telling are prime examples of the change Women For One hopes to inspire in their community.


Women’s Media Center Congratula​tes Co-Founder Gloria Steinem on Presidenti​al Medal of Freedom

The Women’s Media Center proudly congratulates co-founder Gloria Steinem on being named recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom — the nation’s highest civilian honor.

In its announcement, the White House noted that Steinem is “a leader in the women’s liberation movement, co-founded Ms. magazine, and helped launch a wide variety of groups and publications dedicated to advancing civil rights.  Ms. Steinem has received dozens of awards over the course of her career, and remains an active voice for women’s rights.”

Julie Burton, president of The Women’s Media Center, said, “The board and staff at The Women’s Media Center are thrilled that President Barack Obama will present the Presidential Medal of Freedom to our co-founder, Gloria Steinem.  This is a well-deserved honor:  For over four decades, Gloria has struggled for political and social equality and justice. We have come to take it for granted that she will always be where she is most needed, at the podium, on TV, on the plane, phone, or at the computer, to make the ideal of social justice a reality. Her phrases have become the motto of our era. Her activism and fundraising have directly transformed the constitution of Congress and state legislatures. Women are in these places because of the endeavors of Gloria Steinem.

Burton continued, “The history of the women’s movement has been a struggle for women’s voices to be heard. In the tradition of Susan B. Anthony, Sojourner Truth, and Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Gloria has forever changed the 20th and 21st centuries for women and men through her words and actions. Her brilliant writing, tireless advocacy, intelligence and humor have carried and propelled our dreams.  We are so proud that President Obama will honor her with the Presidential Medal of Freedom.”

Steinem is one of 16 recipients who will be honored by Obama at the White House later this year. The medal is “presented to individuals who have made especially meritorious contributions to the security or national interests of the U.S., to world peace, or to cultural or other significant public or private endeavors.”

“I’m honored and touched to receive the Medal of Freedom, especially in the company of Bayard Rustin, Oprah Winfrey, Sally Ride, and other of my heroes,” Steinem said. “I know this is a recognition of the countless women and men who have worked for a society in which we are linked, not ranked, and have always understood that the caste systems based on sex and race, class and sexuality, can only be uprooted together. There is no president from whose hand I would be more honored to receive this than President Obama.”

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the executive order signed by President John F. Kennedy establishing the medal. More than 500 individuals have been awarded the medal.

 “The Presidential Medal of Freedom goes to men and women who have dedicated their own lives to enriching ours,” Obama said in a White House statement issued today. “This year’s honorees have been blessed with extraordinary talent, but what sets them apart is their gift for sharing that talent with the world. It will be my honor to present them with a token of our nation’s gratitude.”

Other honorees announced today include former President Bill Clinton, media mogul Oprah Winfrey, country singer Loretta Lynn, former Washington Post editor Ben Bradlee, baseball star Ernie Banks, former University of North Carolina basketball coach Dean Smith, former Indiana senator Richard Lugar, jazz legend Arturo Sandoval, Nobel Prize winners Daniel Kahnemann and Mario Molina, U.S. Circuit Court chief judge Patricia Wald and civil rights leader C.T. Vivian. Posthumous awards went to astronaut Sally Ride, former Sen. Daniel Inouye and late civil rights activist Bayard Rustin.

The Women’s Media Center works to make women and girls visible and powerful in the media through strategic programs that transform the media landscape, and that include media training, media monitoring and activism, media reports, media programs, and special initiatives.  The Women’s Media Center also produces original media content on our CBS radio show, “Women’s Media Center Live with Robin Morgan,” and publishes Women’s Media Center Features that provide progressive women’s perspectives on both headline stories and timely events. In addition to Steinem and Morgan, the organization was founded in 2005 by Jane Fonda.


For more information, contact Cristal Williams Chancellor, media relations manager, cristal@womensmediacenter.com or 202-587-1636


Want to know how much water runs off your property to our streams?

This month the EPA launched a new FREE software program that will calculate you stormwater runoff.  The calculator and directions can be downloaded HERE.  The calculator was developed as part of President Obama’s Climate Action Plan, and is an innovative tool to help Property owners, developers, land planners, engineers, and landscape architects make informed decisions to protect local waterways from non-point source pollution.  Preventing stormwater runoff, which can impact drinking water resources and local ecosystems, protects people’s health and the environment.

The calculator can be used along with our WaterRICH Program and Handbook to help property owners learn what they can do to help reduce stormwater runoff and non-point source pollution.   Including design and construction of rain gardens to help infiltrate stormwater, rain water harvesting, and a variety of other landscaping techniques which can help reduce sedimentation and pollution in our streams.


How to Talk to Little Girls

I went to a dinner party at a friend’s home last weekend, and met her five-year-old daughter for the first time. Little Maya was all curly brown hair, doe-like dark eyes, and adorable in her shiny pink nightgown. I wanted to squeal, “Maya, you’re so cute! Look at you! Turn around and model that pretty ruffled gown, you gorgeous thing!”

But I didn’t. I squelched myself. As I always bite my tongue when I meet little girls, restraining myself from my first impulse, which is to tell them how darn cute/ pretty/ beautiful/ well-dressed/ well-manicured/ well-coiffed they are.

What’s wrong with that? It’s our culture’s standard talking-to-little-girls icebreaker, isn’t it? And why not give them a sincere compliment to boost their self-esteem? Because they are so darling I just want to burst when I meet them, honestly. Continue Reading  (article submitted by Althea Gonzalez)


WHO Releases Global Report on Health Effects of Violence Against Women

The World Health Organization has released a new report, “Global and regional estimates of violence against women: prevalence and health effects of intimate partner violence and non-partner sexual violence,” [PDF] that attempts to quantify how many women around the world are exposed to physical and sexual violence at some point in their lives, and describes many of the associated poor health outcomes.

The findings are probably not surprising, but they are still disturbing.

WHO reports that 35 percent of women worldwide — more than 1 in 3 — have been physically and/or sexually abused. These figures do not include emotional/psychological abuse.  Continue Reading

 


Welcome to the Organic Growers School Conference Library

 
Each year, we host over 70 classes and hands on workshops for anyone and everyone with a stake in the local food movement. There are so many classes to choose from that you rarely get to see everything you want. Many of our speakers are kind enough to provide their powerpoints or handouts to be included in our Spring Conference Library. Scroll down to find topics, and click on the class title to download items from that class. Click here for the OGS Library

Women’s History: The New York Times Reviews “Our Bodies, Ourselves”

Women’s History: The New York Times Reviews “Our Bodies, Ourselves”

 

Forty years ago today, The New York Times reviewed “Our Bodies, Ourselves” under the headline “Thinking About the Thinkable.”

 

It’s fascinating to see how the book was received in the mainstream press — and, in this case, how one of the most prominent book reviewers of the late 20th century, Christopher Lehmann-Haupt, approached the text.  Click here to read the entire article

 

 


Books that Changed Everything: Reading, Writing the creative life

Falling in love with books is much like falling in love with humans

not only do they teach you new and exciting things about yourself, they open you up to as-yet unknown possibilities in life.

Hopeless romantic that I am, I fall in love with books continuously, and I have a diverse book collection and an overflowing bookshelf to prove it. Click to read the entire article


Women’s Media Center Congratula​tes Gloria Steinem on Presidenti​al Medal of Freedom

The Women’s Media Center proudly congratulates co-founder Gloria Steinem on being named recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom — the nation’s highest civilian honor.

In its announcement, the White House noted that Steinem is “a leader in the women’s liberation movement, co-founded Ms. magazine, and helped launch a wide variety of groups and publications dedicated to advancing civil rights.  Ms. Steinem has received dozens of awards over the course of her career, and remains an active voice for women’s rights.”


Fear of Jane Austen

When the Bank of England announced last month its intention to portray Jane Austen on its ten-pound note, it seemed the most uncontroversial of choices. Who better than Austen to stand as a representative of female accomplishment? Many of the female historical figures that might have been chosen were shocking in their time: consider Mary Wollstonecraft and Florence Nightingale. And most still have an air of scandal about them, their subsequent canonization notwithstanding. Continue reading


Trim, Toned and Tranquil: Nutrition, Exercise and Relaxation Experts at Baylor Offer Summertime Strategies

Trim, Toned and Tranquil: Nutrition, Exercise and Relaxation Experts at Baylor Offer Summertime Strategies.

 

Heard about the 10-day fast allowing only cayenne, lemon and maple syrup? Close your ears.Such celebrity “detox diets,” touted to shed the body of toxins while helping you get svelte, are questionable, unnecessary and even unhealthy.So says dietitian Suzy Weems, Ph.D., chair of Baylor University’s family and consumer sciences and a former chair of the legislative and public policy committee for the American Dietetic Association.“There’s very little toxin that exists in the body unless it’s a high enough dose to make you sick. And if so, that’s likely to happen no matter what,” she said.

 

Be advised that “your body is an extraordinarily effective mechanism,” Weems said. “There’s protective bacteria in the mouth. The stomach is highly acidic. The liver is a really good organ that’s incredibly protective, and the kidneys work as a filter.”Yes, there are “virtually no calories in lemons, and cayenne will make you sweat. Maple syrup gives you glucose, so that might help you maintain energy while you’re not eating anything,” Weems said.But while such diets may cut the appetite or speed up the system, any shed weight will be pretty much water. “Water weighs a pound a pint. But when you rehydrate, it’s not a loss,” Weems said. She suggests more moderate food choices instead.“Switch to lots of fresh fruit and vegetables,” she said. “This is the time of year when fresh food is reasonably priced.

 

 

”The Truth About Sweat“

The nice thing about summer is that many people become more active, whether they work in the yard, take part in sports with their children or get more involved in their own exercise programs,” said Darryn Willoughby, Ph.D., director of Baylor’s Exercise and Biochemical Nutrition Laboratory and an associate professor of health, human performance and recreation.But the flip side is that summer heat brings the risk of dehydration — especially since the body’s temperature regulation is more like a furnace than an air conditioner, Willoughby said.“Our bodies are always producing heat as a result of all the cells in our body that have to make energy to survive,” he said. “Since our body is always producing heat, it must be able to lose heat as well.”The body can lose heat by air or water moving across the skin, but during exercise, most of the heat is lost through sweat evaporating, Willoughby said.“When we sweat, our bodies also lose electrolytes — sodium, potassium, chloride, calcium — as well as water.  During heavy, long-duration exercise, we can lose approximately 1/4 gallon of water through sweating,” depending on temperature, humidity, type of clothing worn, intensity of exercise and fitness level.“If we become thirsty, then we are already somewhat dehydrated,” Willoughby said. “We should not wait until thirsty to drink fluids.  . . If we don’t drink enough water, we can get dehydrated and suffer from light-headedness, nausea and dark-colored urine. If not recognized, dehydration can even result in kidney failure and or, in extreme cases, death.”He offered these guidelines for exercising during the heat:

 

 

  • Avoid exercising from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., the hottest part of the day
  • Wear loose, light-colored clothes. Lighter color helps reflect heat; cotton clothes will help sweat evaporate.
  • About 24 hours before exercise, consume fluids and foods to promote hydration, such as fruits, vegetables and carbohydrates. Two hours before exercise, drink 16 ounces (two cups). During exercise of less than an hour, drink water every 15 minutes; if the exercise lasts more than an hour, drink a carbohydrate/electrolyte drink (a “sport drink”) every 15 minutes.
  • After exercise, drink a carbohydrate/electrolyte “sport” drink.
  • Before and after exercise, avoid alcohol and caffeine, which can cause water loss.

 

Cures for the Summertime BluesWhen temperatures are simmering, it’s easy to get cranky, anxious and weary.Loeen Irons, a lecturer in Baylor’s health, human performance and recreation department, has some ideas for de-stressing and re-energizing.Unlike early humans, “your body is not in the wilds of Africa running away from lions,” Irons said. “Our bodies are outdated. The things that raise our stress levels are generally things that we can’t punch or run away from, so ‘fight or flight’ doesn’t work for us. But the body doesn’t know that.”Exercise – especially aerobic exercise – helps burn off stress hormones, said Irons, an aerobics instructor.“Stretching, breathing, body awareness, nature — those are good things to turn your focus away from your cell phone and computer,” Irons said. “You need some kind of quiet time for 10 or 15 minutes now and then, whether it’s prayer or meditation or just being unplugged.”Another de-stresser is playing or snuggling with a furry friend. “There’s something really freeing about tending to your pet,” Irons said. “It takes you to a different place.”“And of course, get a great night’s sleep. It’s like the old chicken or the egg question: Are you tranquil because you slept well, or did you sleep well because you’re tranquil? It doesn’t matter. Either way is good.”Some yoga tips to beat the heat come from Baylor alum Amy Tarter, a yoga instructor in Baylor’s rest and relaxation class in the health, human performance and recreation department.To get a leg up on keeping cool, calm and energized, she suggests the “Legs Up the Wall” yoga pose for starters:

 

  • Lie on your back with your bottom close to the wall. Extend your legs up the wall and rest your arms out to the sides, palms up. (Place a thick blanket under your back to make it more comfortable, if needed). Keep the legs firm up the wall, but feel yourself ‘let go’ and relax the rest of your body. This pose relieves fatigue in the legs and feet, prevents edema and varicose veins, soothes the nervous system, and increases circulation, as well as some mental benefits.

 

Other yoga aids:

  • “Child’s Pose.” Fold your legs underneath you and sit on the heels with your shoulders above your hips. Now bow forward and place your chest on your thighs and bottom on the top of your heels.  You can bring your arms forward, stretching them out long in front of you or wrap them around you toward your feet. This alleviates head, neck and chest pain; stretches ankles, knees and hips; opens the upper back; and helps calm the mind and lesson fatigue.  
  • “Corpse Pose.” Lie flat on your back, relaxing your legs to a slight “V” opening and allowing your toes to roll out toward either side of the body. Place your arms away a foot away from the body with palms facing up and the back of the hands resting on the floor. Soften completely into the floor, making sure to close your eyes. To help your facial muscles relax, put a towel over your eyes or face.  
  • Deep breathing. Lie on your back. Place the right hand on the upper chest and left hand right around the belly button.  Notice your natural breath and how your hands rise and fall. Now take deeper inhalations which will make the left hand, the one on the lower belly, rise. Then send the inhalation to the right hand and completely exhale.  Continue this pattern for a few minutes to lower blood pressure, massage your organs and release “stale” air from your lungs.

 


Study: IUDs Offer Safe Contraception Option for Teens But Rarely Prescribed

Study: IUDs Offer Safe Contraception Option for Teens But Rarely Prescribed

Intrauterine devices (IUDs) are a fairly safe, long-acting form of contraception, but many myths about the devices persist. For example, it’s somewhat common to hear that women who haven’t already had a baby, and especially teenagers, are not good candidates for IUDs; neither of these is true. Click here to read the entire article


Women’s Lives: Join Us on Women’s Advocacy Day April 9

Join Us on Women’s Advocacy Day

Are you ready? Come to Raleigh on Tuesday, April 9!

  • Hear Kim Gandy talk about her history of working for women, especially in the area of Violence Against Women
  • Hear representatives from NCWU member organizations talk about other issues of concern.
  • Join with others from your district and across the state to speak to your legislators about the issues of most concern to you
  • If you are free Monday evening, join us for a special reception in honor of Ms. Gandy and focused on the issues of violence against women

Registration is open! Please let us know you are coming!

Women’s Advocacy Day and the reception are free and open to the public, though space is limited at the reception. Donors to NCWU will be recognized at the reception with special recognition for those contributing at least $75 (bronze), $150 (silver) and $250 (gold). Please consider a donation to help our efforts.

“Words,” we are fond of saying around here, “mean things.”

 

The inference is that those of us in the communications business should not toss the tools of our trade around carelessly; that we should respect their meaning and nuances, and use them precisely to express what we want to say.

That’s why we have copy editors, who serve as the last line of defense against muddled meanings. And it’s why we have stylebooks, which, among other things, delineate the consistency in how certain words and phrases should be employed.

I give you this background as a way of preparing the ground for some familiar words that you will shortly begin seeing used in unfamiliar ways.

The words are “husband” and “wife.” Click here to read the entire article


MAKERS; Women Who Make America

This video tells the remarkable story of the most sweeping social revolution in American history, as women have asserted their rights to a full and fair share of political power, economic opportunity, and personal autonomy.  It’s a revolution that has unfolded in public and private, in courts and Congress, in the boardroom and the bedroom, changing not only what the world expects from women, but what women expect from themselves. Click here for the video

Gloria Steinem, longtime feminist and founder of Ms. Magazine, talks with PBS NewsHour Senior Correspondent Judy Woodruff on Tuesday, February 26, 2013.

They’ll discuss the women’s movement and the renewed debate over whether women can “have it all.” They’ll explore how far women have come and the challenges ahead. To what extent are women responsible for their own success? What role do governments and employers play? Check your local listings for PBS NewsHour.

Steinem is featured in the PBS documentary, “MAKERS: Women Who Make America.” It examines the sweeping social revolution, as women have taken larger and more prominent roles in political, economic and social arenas. The documentary tells the stories of trailblazing women whose work has altered nearly every aspect of American culture. “MAKERS” airs on February 26th at 8:00 P.M. Eastern time on PBS.

Anne D. Bell
Public Relations Manager
PBS NEWSHOUR
2700 South Quincy St.; Suite 250
Arlington, VA 22206
Office – (703) 998-2175
@AnneBell

 


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