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Women's Lives & Education

Why study women, minorities, or other controversial subjects at all? The answer is: a good liberal education (liberal as in “freedom”) teaches people to think both “inside the box” and “outside the box”.  Gender studies programs can encourage students to creatively examine their surroundings and learn to identify both the empowering and dis-empowering properties of words and deeds and to consider the relationship of race, gender, class and ethnicity as well as the manifestation and effects of gender bias in society.   Your suggestions and submissions are welcomed.
Research on Women and Education     Women’s Media Center     OnTrack Women’s Financial Empowerment Center     The Community Foundation of WNC – Women for Women grants     Western Women’s Business Center     Womansong of Asheville Women’s Chorus & New Start Program

Let’s Talk About Sex–And Reproductive Justice

BY AMIE NEWMAN | OUR BODIES OURSELVES

Thanks to the reproductive justice collective SisterSong and the group’s allies and partners, reproductive justice is a phrase and a concept well-known within the reproductive health and rights movement. But it wasn’t always that way. In 1994, a group of Black women issued a very public call to action in the Washington Post demanding that the healthcare needs of the most marginalized be included in President Clinton’s healthcare reform legislation. Specifically, they demanded universal health care and spoke to the necessity for Black women’s access to reproductive health care. They called reproductive freedom “a life and death issue for many Black women” and said it “deserves as much recognition as any other freedom.” The group, Women of African Descent for Reproductive Justice, helped catapult these ideas and organized Black women around the country in support of reproductive justice and the intersection of human rights and reproductive rights for women of color.  Continue reading

Buoyancy Rather Than Burnout in Our Lives – an interview with Krista Tippett in OnBeing

Krista Tippett, host: Roshi Joan Halifax has said, “I am not a ‘nice’ Buddhist. I’m much more interested in a kind of plain rice, get-down-in-the-street Buddhism.” She is a Zen teacher and a medical anthropologist who’s been formed by cultures from the Sahara Desert to the hallways of American prisons. She founded the project on Being with Dying, and now she’s taking on the problem of compassion fatigue, though she doesn’t like that phrase. Whatever you call it, for all of us overwhelmed by bad news and by the attention we want to pay to suffering in the world, Joan Halifax has wisdom.

Click here to listen to the Episode


IF WE ADDRESS TOXIC MASCULINITY, WE CAN CHANGE OUR CULTURE OF VIOLENCE

Sunday night in Las Vegas, a white male shooter claimed the lives of 58 people, injuring more than 500. We are heartbroken by the lives lost. We are heartbroken for the injured. We are heartbroken for their families and loved ones. We are heartbroken that we can’t pass commonsense gun laws in our nation. But we will not let our broken hearts keep us from getting to the root cause of this violence and taking action.

It is time to connect the dots between mass shootings and our cultural reality: Men commit 98% of mass murders in America. Women have equal access to guns (and let’s be honest, plenty of reasons to be angry). Nevertheless, women don’t commit such acts of mass violence. We have to stop conditioning boys and men to think solving their problems through violence is normal. We can no longer tell boys at the earliest of ages to repress their emotions and deny parts of themselves. Look where it’s gotten us today!     Continue reading


Global feminists— Gloria Steinem to Leymah Gbowee—join in solidarity with Congolese women

By Lucy Westcott | 

On computer screens thousands of miles away from one another, some of the world’s leading feminist figures joined in solidarity with women in the Democratic Republic of the Congo at the country’s first-ever women’s summit on September 14. For a country that marginalizes women’s voices in the extreme way that DRC does, this was a chance for powerful women activists to be not only heard, but globally supported.


Gender remains one of climate change’s great inequalities

Sales agent Shumitra Chaudhari in the shop she has recently opened selling clean energy and beauty products in Kailali District, Nepal (Photo: Ashden)

Globally, women are more affected by climate change. Sweden’s deputy prime minister and the head of the Green Climate Fund say they must be brought into the discussion

Gender often remains the untold story behind climate change. After the television snapshots of devastation wrought by climate-induced disasters, our thoughts often remain with the local people forced to deal with the wreckage.


YWCA Launches New Evidence-Based Model for Diabetes Program

YWCA Launches New Evidence-Based Model for Diabetes Program

 ASHEVILLE, NC – Beginning in August 2017 the YWCA Diabetes Wellness & Prevention Program (DWP) is taking on a new model. Through our new evidence-based curriculum, DWP aims to help program participants lower A1C blood sugar levels, lose weight, increase energy, and build a community of support.


Youth Financial Literacy – Important Tips from Starks Financial Group

In October 2016 and May 2017, Starks Financial Group sponsored several rock concerts for area middle and high schools.  Rock concerts, you say?  What on Earth does this have to do with financial literacy?  Well, these were very special rock concerts!  These concerts were in partnership with Funding the Future, a non-profit dedicated to helping get the word out to today’s young people about the importance of financial literacy.


Five Myths About Female Veterans

Jerri Bell, a retired naval officer, is a co-author, with Tracy Crow, of “It’s My Country Too: Women’s Military Stories From the American Revolution to Afghanistan.” – in the Washington Post

Veterans Day is an occasion to recall the service of our troops. But women’s stories have often been absent from those recollections. Works of fiction and nonfiction, memoirs (such as Mary Jennings Hegar’s), documentaries (including “The Invisible War”) and dramas (such as “Blood Stripe”) have helped show this side of the armed forces. Still, myths about female veterans endure. Kayla Williams, who wrote a memoir about serving as an Army linguist in Iraq, remembers an infantryman who was “sure that women troops would be flown by helicopter to shower every three days.” Here are some of the most persistent misconceptions.   Continue reading


For Guys Reading #MeToo Testimonies

BY COURTNEY E. MARTIN (@COURTWRITES), COLUMNIST

First, read the #metoo stories on your Facebook or Twitter feed.

Read about the bosses and teachers and neighbors and friends who have sexually harassed and assaulted the people you know and maybe even love. Pay special attention to the stories. You will see patterns. You will shudder at the abuses of power. You might even feel sick to your stomach. Then immediately…

Do nothing.

Sit in silence. Don’t say anything. Don’t retweet anything. Don’t text anyone. Just sit there. Maybe even close your eyes. Feel what you feel. Continue reading

 


Economic Security for Survivors

Economic insecurity has devastating consequences on the lives of survivors of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking. Abuse can impose significant expenses on survivors, including physical and mental health care costs, lost wages, safety planning, and relocation costs. Furthermore, economic abuse can result in life-long consequences due to job loss, debt, damaged credit, or coercion into crime. When combined with today’s high cost of living, shortage of good jobs, and diminished safety net, these impacts of abuse severely limit survivors’ options and ability to achieve safety and justice.


THE 2017 NOBEL PEACE PRIZE – awarded to the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN)

By Michael Birnbaum

The world has some 15,000 nuclear weapons. This year’s Nobel Peace Prize honors the quest to abolish all of them.

 The International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons won the Nobel Peace Prize on Friday, a recognition of its efforts to avoid nuclear conflict at a time  of greater atomic menace than at any other period in recent memory.

The group was honored because of its efforts to foster a global ban on nuclear weapons, the Norwegian Nobel Committee said. The Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons was approved in July by 122 members of the United Nations and opened for signatures last month. The 10-year-old grass-roots civil society movement pushes for nuclear disarmament across the world.  Continue reading

 
 

The Banned 1910s Magazine That Started a Feminist Movement in Japan

BY SARAH LASKOW in Atlas Obscura and offered by Ed Raiola

It was close to 10 p.m. on a spring night in Tokyo in 1912, when Kazuko Mozume heard a dog barking behind her father’s house. It would not stop. At the back gate, she found three men waiting for her, a policeman and two others. They didn’t say what they wanted, they only asked her if this was the office of Seitō, the women’s literature magazine she had started with four other young women.


When women sign off emails as men, doors open. It’s like magic!

By   in The Guardian

Picture this: you’re a woman. You’ve got a great idea for a startup, but you’re having trouble getting people to work with you on it. You have a sneaking suspicion it’s because of your gender … although then again, it could all be in your head. What do you do?

Invent a male co-founder, of course.

A pair of artists and entrepreneurs named Penelope Gazin and Kate Dwyer elicited grim laughter from women all over this week when they revealed they’d done just that in their quest to get their startup off the ground.  Continue reading


The Good (the Bad The Ugly) by Jane Edwards

Really.  It is high time we acknowledge the tremendous things Donald J. Trump has done as our president. I can think of eight things right off the bat:
 
1. Spared us from both constant Republican stonewalling and nonstop vitriol from the GOP’s Perpetual Senate Investigative Committee to Impeach Hillary.
 
2. Dramatically increased public awareness of and interest in the Constitution. Including such concepts as the Emoluments clause, Article 25, and the 25thAmendment.


Planned Parenthood at a Glance – Some Stats About Who We Are

Planned Parenthood is one of the nation’s leading providers of high-quality, affordable health care for women, men, and young people, and the nation’s largest provider of sex education. Planned Parenthood also works with partner organizations worldwide to improve the sexual health and well-being of individuals and families everywhere.

Planned Parenthood has 56 independent local affiliates that operate more than 600 health centers throughout the United States, providing high-quality services to women, men, and teens. Planned Parenthood often is the only source of family planning for a large proportion of the women we serve.  Continue reading


Lisa Unger Baskin Collection – Duke University Libraries “The unifying thread is that women have always been productive and working people and this history essentially has been hidden.”

Collection Overview

The Lisa Unger Baskin Collection arrived at Rubenstein Library in April 2015. Carefully assembled over forty-five years by noted bibliophile, activist, and collector Lisa Unger Baskin, the collection is a transformative body of material documenting women at work. In Baskin’s own words,

“The unifying thread is that women have always been productive and working people and this history essentially has been hidden.”

The collection includes many well-known monuments of women’s history and arts, as well as lesser-known works produced by female scholars, printers, publishers, laborers, scientists, authors, artists, and political activists. Taken together, they comprise a mosaic of the ways that women have been productive, creative, and socially engaged over more than five hundred years.   Continue reading


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