Sheville

Women's Lives & Education

Why study women, minorities, or other controversial subjects at all? The answer is: a good liberal education (liberal as in “freedom”) teaches people to think both “inside the box” and “outside the box”.  Gender studies programs can encourage students to creatively examine their surroundings and learn to identify both the empowering and dis-empowering properties of words and deeds and to consider the relationship of race, gender, class and ethnicity as well as the manifestation and effects of gender bias in society.   Your suggestions and submissions are welcomed.
Research on Women and Education     Women’s Media Center     OnTrack Women’s Financial Empowerment Center     The Community Foundation of WNC – Women for Women grants     Western Women’s Business Center     Womansong of Asheville Women’s Chorus & New Start Program

Women’s Wellbeing and Development Foundation News

This fall, WWD-F is developing some exciting programs at its Hillcrest Resource Center.There will be some practical workshops and classes for the residents, including a course in soap making, a doula training for residents, and GED tutoring classes. We have also partnered with the Manna Food Bank to run a monthly food pop-up for the community that provides fresh produce and other grocery items to families in need.

The HRC is also expanding its Get Fit Hillcrest initiative by offering a variety of workshops and opportunities for residents to get serious about their health through diet and exercise. And new on the horizon is the Hillcrest Youth Initiative, a week-long after-school program for middle school youth.


FAMILY JUSTICE CENTER Buncombe County North Carolina

A Path to Strength, Safety & Hope

THE FAMILY JUSTICE CENTER (FJC) IS A SAFE PLACE WHERE VICTIMS OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE, SEXUAL ASSAULT AND ELDER ABUSE CAN COME FOR HELP. AT THE BUNCOMBE COUNTY FAMILY JUSTICE CENTER SURVIVORS CAN ACCESS MANY DIFFERENT SERVICES IN ONE LOCATION AND BEGIN THEIR JOURNEY TOWARDS STRENGTH, SAFETY, AND HOPE.

HERE, YOU CAN FIND:

  • Help from experts that can help you figure out how find safety and how to move forward
  • Law enforcement officials to help you with possible criminal charges, gather evidence and information on how the criminal court process works.
  • Legal services with on-site attorneys and legal assistants to help you understand your legal rights and protections and help you navigate the judicial system.
  • Forensic medical exams by a specially trained nurse to exam and document the extent of your injuries.
  • Assistance with creating a safety plan for you and your family.
  • Emotional support, counseling and case managers that can support you in healing from the emotional impacts of violence.

Walk-in Welcomed:  35 Woodfin St.   Asheville, NC  28801

Call for an appointment: 828.250.6900   FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS click here:  https://www.buncombecounty.org/law-safety/family-justice-center/default.aspx   


Our Bodies Our Blog – Why Everyone Should Read This Young Woman’s Letter to Her Rapist

One night in January 2015, two Stanford University graduate students biking across campus spotted a freshman thrusting his body on top of an unconscious, half-naked woman behind a dumpster. This March, a California jury found the former student, 20-year-old Brock Allen Turner, guilty of three counts of sexual assault. Turner faced a maximum of 14 years in state prison. On Thursday, he was sentenced to six months in county jail and probation. The judge said he feared a longer sentence would have a “severe impact” on Turner, a champion swimmer who once aspired to compete in the Olympics — a point repeatedly brought up during the trial.  Continue reading


*ON BEING & How Trauma Lodges in the Body – with Krista Tippett

Bessel van der Kolk— How Trauma Lodges in the Body  
Human memory is a sensory experience, says psychiatrist Bessel van der Kolk. Through his longtime research and innovation in trauma treatment, he shares what he’s learning about how bodywork like yoga or eye movement therapy can restore a sense of goodness and safety. What he’s learning speaks to a resilience we can all cultivate in the face of the overwhelming events — which, after all, make up the drama of culture, of news, and of life.

» Listen on our website
» Subscribe on iTunes


Roberta Madden of Black Mountain Receives Award for ERA Work

Roberta Madden of Black Mountain has been selected for an award from North Carolina Women United. The annual Anne Mackie Award recognizes a lifetime contribution to advocacy on behalf of women. The award will be presented at an NCWU event in Raleigh on December 1, 2015.

Madden founded and is co-director of RATIFY ERA-NC, a statewide organization dedicated to ratification of the Equal Rights Amendment. The ERA has been on American women’s agenda since 1923, when it was first proposed by suffragist Alice Paul. The constitutional amendment was introduced in the NC General Assembly this year for the first time since 1982, when it lost narrowly. Renewed efforts  are underway nationally to make the ERA part of the Constitution. Continue Reading    See also The Black Mountain News


The First National Women’s Rights Convention

The first national Women’s Rights Convention opened in Worcester, Massachusetts October 23,1850. Two years earlier, Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Lucretia Mott had launched the woman suffrage movement with their hastily organized Seneca Falls Convention in New York. They published the Declaration of Sentiments, using language modeled after the Declaration of Independence, to call for voting rights for women. They also expressed a hope that conventions for women’s rights would continue to be held at regular intervals.

The first morning session of the national convention drew 900 delegates, mostly men. By that afternoon, the ranks had swelled to more than a thousand. The hall was packed and many more waited outside. People came from 11 states, including California, which had only been a state for a few weeks. The president and keynote speaker, Paulina Kellogg Wright Davis, called for “the emancipation of a class, the redemption of half the world, and a conforming reorganization of all social, political, and industrial interests and institutions.” Other speakers followed, included Lucretia Mott, Frederick Douglass, and Sojourner Truth. The convention closed with a speech by Lucy Stone that moved Horace Greeley to take up the cause in the New York Tribune, which in turn inspired Susan B. Anthony to join the women’s movement. Stone said: “We want to be something more than the appendages of Society; we want that Woman should be the coequal and help-meet of Man in all the interest and perils and enjoyments of human life. We want that she should attain to the development of her nature and womanhood; we want that when she dies, it may not be written on her gravestone that she was the ‘relict’ of somebody.”

The Tribune was a rare exception, however; most newspapers were scornful at best and openly hostile at worst. The New York Herald published what it called “the actual designs of that piebald assemblage called the Women’s Rights Convention,” a list that included abolishing the Bible, the Constitution, the laws of the land, and the gallows; encouraging the “free and miscellaneous amalgamation of sexes and colors”; and “cut[ting] throats ad libitum.” 


Girls Rock Asheville is now an official 501(c)(3) non-profit organization!

Our Mission

“Girls Rock Asheville is a nonprofit camp dedicated to empowering girls, trans* youth and ladies of all backgrounds and abilities through music education. As mentors, we provide a supportive space to encourage participants to express themselves through performance, positive identity development, musical experimentation, peer collaboration and DIY production.”

Asheville, NC. Girls Rock Asheville is proud to announce our official 501(c)(3) non-profit status.

From President Erin Kinard: “Having our 501(c)(3) status will help us pursue our mission by making us eligible for grants, saving us money, and enabling our donors to write off their contributions.”

Girls Rock Asheville has just completed our second year of camp with exciting plans in development for the coming year, including ladies rock camp, an after school program, and dynamic monthly events that encourage community engagement. Attainment of official non-profit status enables our organization to accomplish more and grow in a sustainable way, while providing a solid bedrock for girls and trans* youth to grow in confidence and leadership.

“Asheville, a city with strong progressive roots, has been overwhelmingly supportive of our mission and vision, and we look forward to thriving while filling a vital role in our community,” says Kinard. “In addition to the gratitude we have toward our Asheville supporters, we also thank Girls Rock Charleston for being our fiscal sponsors during the approval process.”

Girls Rock Asheville is a nonprofit camp dedicated to empowering girls, trans* youth and ladies of all backgrounds and abilities through music education. As mentors, we provide a supportive space to encourage participants to express themselves through performance, positive identity development, musical experimentation, peer collaboration and DIY production.

To find out more about Girls Rock Asheville, please visit our website- www.girlsrockasheville.org, and our Facebook page. For more information, contact Erin Kinard at girlsrockasheville@gmail.com.

 

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Annual announcement of the New-England Female Medical College (detail of title page), 1860, Francis A. Countway Library, Harvard Medical School

Boston Female Medical College 1848

The first medical school for women opened in Boston, Massachusetts, on this date in 1848. It was started by Samuel Gregory, who named it the Boston Female Medical College. The first class – 12 women in all – graduated just two years later, in 1850. Gregory’s own formal medical training consisted of a summer lecture course that he had taken in anatomy and physiology. He wasn’t remotely a supporter of women’s rights, but he believed it was unseemly for male doctors to assist women in childbirth, so the college was mostly intended to serve as a school for midwives at first. In 1856, the school’s name was changed to the New England Female Medical College; it named among its graduates Rebecca Lee Crumper, the first African-American to earn a medical degree, which she did in 1864.  Continue reading


How Good Habits Can Make You Happier

One of life’s enduring missions is the quest to create good habits. The big ones always come to the forefront: eating healthier, exercising more, becoming more productive. And as many of us know, the stumbling blocks are ever-present. But as Gretchen Rubin sees it, one of the keys to effectively generating good habits is simply knowing yourself, stating, “Shape the habit to suit yourself, and then you set yourself up for success.”  Continue reading


NC Women United

NC Women United is a coalition of state and local organizations:

  • Direct service organizations, such as women’s resource centers
  • Focused advocacy groups, such as coalitions against sexual assault and domestic violence
  • Membership and professional organizations, generally the NC arms of national organizations
  • Government agencies, such as city and county councils for women
  • A few larger agencies with broad-based programs, such as the NC Justice Center and Planned Parenthood affiliates

We are an all-volunteer group, supported by representatives of our members and unaffiliated individuals who support our goals.  Click for more information


SheSource2

Women’s Media Center SheSource database of women experts

WMC SheSource Experts for Journalists and Media

Women’s Media Center’s SheSource database of women experts is the go-to resource for journalists, bookers, and producers seeking women experts to appear on TV and to quote in print and online media.  When you need an expert perspective or a source on the leading issues of the day, come to WMC SheSource and we will connect you to leading experts from every field.  Click for SheSource experts

Why do we need WMC SheSource?

‘The sad fact is, gender inequality is so deeply ingrained in our culture, most people don’t realize there’s a problem….No major (issue) can be approached effectively without including the needs, views, and talents of the other half of the population …. We are all responsible for changing the conversation.  Not tomorrow, but right now.’
– Jane Fonda, Women’s Media Center co-founder


Human Rights Watch – Women’s Rights

Despite great strides made by the international women’s rights movement over many years, women and girls around the world are still married as children or trafficked into forced labor and sex slavery. They are refused access to education and political participation, and some are trapped in conflicts where rape is perpetrated as a weapon of war.

Around the world, deaths related to pregnancy and childbirth are needlessly high, and women are prevented from making deeply personal choices in their private lives. Human Rights Watch is working toward the realization of women’s empowerment and gender equality—protecting the rights and improving the lives of women and girls on the ground. Continue reading


Womansong’s New Start Program and AB Tech College Advancement

 
 
I would like to share some amazing information with each of you that you may not be aware of – unless you are a member of Womansong of Asheville!   Amazingly, though not surprisingly, the women who sing with Womansong have raised over $100,000 for their New Start Program over the last ten years.  By focusing on their goal of supporting women enrolling in our regional community colleges, such as A-B Tech, the New Start Program has made grants and scholarship awards totaling an amazing $100,000! 
 
As we move into the season of giving, reflect on the power of collective efforts.  We often say, “No donation is too small.”  That’s because, when combined with other gifts, the impact of your gift can be quite powerful.  The Foundation, like Womansong!, is a resource for many.  Scholarships change lives and create strong communities! 

 
Sincerely,

Sue H Olesiuk


The First National Women’s Rights Convention

The first national Women’s Rights Convention opened in Worcester, Massachusetts October 23, 1850. Two years earlier, Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Lucretia Mott had launched the woman suffrage movement with their hastily organized Seneca Falls Convention in New York. They published the Declaration of Sentiments, using language modeled after the Declaration of Independence, to call for voting rights for women. They also expressed a hope that conventions for women’s rights would continue to be held at regular intervals.


10 Historic Women Photographers You Should Know

Let’s get our art history on.

Next month, Sotheby’s will bring a broad array of photography to the auction block, illuminating the impressive range of the medium through a survey of Modern and Post-War image makers. While audiences will get their fair share of the men who helped changed the history of photos — think Bill Brandt, Robert Frank, Weegee, Alfred Stieglitz and Ansel Adams — some of the most impressive names in the bunch belong to the 20th and 21st century women who have brought the art of photography to new heights. Continue reading


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