Sheville

Get Free Email Updates!

Get progressive community news & events.

I agree to have my personal information transfered to MailChimp ( more information )

I will never give away, trade or sell your email address. You can unsubscribe at any time.

Women's Lives & Education

Why study women, minorities, or other controversial subjects at all? The answer is: a good liberal education (liberal as in “freedom”) teaches people to think both “inside the box” and “outside the box”.  Gender studies programs can encourage students to creatively examine their surroundings and learn to identify both the empowering and dis-empowering properties of words and deeds and to consider the relationship of race, gender, class and ethnicity as well as the manifestation and effects of gender bias in society.   Your suggestions and submissions are welcomed.
Research on Women and Education     Women’s Media Center     OnTrack Women’s Financial Empowerment Center     The Community Foundation of WNC – Women for Women grants     Western Women’s Business Center     Womansong of Asheville Women’s Chorus & New Start Program

This is why Iceland ranks first for gender equality

By Magnea Marinósdóttir Equality Unit, Ministry of Welfare, Iceland  and Rósa Erlingsdóttir Equality Unit, Ministry of Welfare, Iceland

For Icelanders, it is a source of pride to be the frontrunner in the World Economic Forum’s Global Gender Gap Index for the ninth year in a row. Ranking at the top is a confirmation of the successes achieved in recent decades and inspires us to continue to work towards complete equality of status, influence and power of men and women.


Bounty & Soul – creating a health and wellness movement

Bounty & Soul is a non-profit organization dedicated to creating a health and wellness movement in underserved communities in Buncombe and McDowell Counties. Our fresh, free food markets provide healthy, fresh produce and whole grains along with nutrition education and health and wellness resources for children, families, individuals, and seniors who struggle with food insecurity and poor health. We offer our services at five weekly markets.


Minnie Driver: men like Matt Damon ‘cannot understand what abuse is like’

 in the Guardian

The actor Minnie Driver has told the Guardian that men “simply cannot understand what abuse is like on a daily level” and should not therefore attempt to differentiate or explain sexual misconduct against women. 

Driver was discussing comments by Matt Damon, whom she once dated and with whom she starred in the Oscar-winning 1997 film Good Will Hunting. In an interview with ABC News this week, Damon said alleged sexual misconduct by powerful men involved “a spectrum of behaviour”.

Continue reading


Five Myths About Female Veterans

Jerri Bell, a retired naval officer, is a co-author, with Tracy Crow, of “It’s My Country Too: Women’s Military Stories From the American Revolution to Afghanistan.” – in the Washington Post

Veterans Day is an occasion to recall the service of our troops. But women’s stories have often been absent from those recollections. Works of fiction and nonfiction, memoirs (such as Mary Jennings Hegar’s), documentaries (including “The Invisible War”) and dramas (such as “Blood Stripe”) have helped show this side of the armed forces. Still, myths about female veterans endure. Kayla Williams, who wrote a memoir about serving as an Army linguist in Iraq, remembers an infantryman who was “sure that women troops would be flown by helicopter to shower every three days.” Here are some of the most persistent misconceptions.   Continue reading


The Healing Power of Counseling: Addressing How Racial Inequities Impact Dementia

By Northwestern University’s Online Masters in Counseling program

After her husband died in 1986, Cornelia Moss lived alone in her native Arkansas for 13 years before moving to Wisconsin to live with her daughter. 

As the wife of a cotton farmer who raised 16 children in a segregated small town in the South, Moss, who was Black, had lived a hard life filled as much with stress as joy.


Portraits of Nineteenth Century AFRICAN AMERICAN WOMEN ACTIVISTS

The following is a guest post by Beverly Brannan, Curator of Photography, Prints & Photographs Division.

African American women as well as men assumed civic responsibilities in the decades after the Civil War. William Henry Richards (1856-1941) was active in several organizations that promoted civil rights and civil liberties for African Americans at the end of the nineteenth century. (this info sent in by Lyte)  Continue reading…


PROGRESSIVE WOMEN’S VOICES – the Women’s Media Center Training Program

Progressive Women’s Voices is the premier media and leadership training program in the country for women. Representing a range of expertise and diversity across race, class, geography, sexual preference, ability, and generation, participants receive advanced, comprehensive training and tools to position themselves as media spokeswomen in their fields, thereby changing the conversation on issues that fill headlines. Graduates join a network of alumnae who support each other in their media goals.


EQUAL RIGHTS AMENDMENT-NC Alliance Action, Education Legislative Program Calendar 2018

     Direct Action, Educating, Lobbying, Coalition Building  General Even Year Activities (mid-session Jan – Apr & short session May – July):

  • Constructs lobbying campaign to secure bill sponsors, co-sponsors for long session.
  • Develops legislative surveys.
  • Organizes plans to expand action teams.
  • Concentrates on ERA awareness building in the general population.
  • Formulates education campaign for legislators and general public.
  • Develops training materials for internal structure and legislative processes.

Recy Taylor, Civil Rights Heroine dies at 97

Recy Taylor, whose bold testimony in 1944 helped lay the foundation for the civil rights movement, quietly passed away this morning (December 28) She would’ve been 98 on Sunday. She is survived by a number of loving & devoted family members. She inspired me & many to use our voices as weapons

Photo Credit: Danielle L. McGuire

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Recy Taylor (December 31, 1919 – December 28, 2017was a black woman from Abbeville in Henry County, Alabama, US. On September 3, 1944, she was kidnappedwhile leaving church and gang-raped by six white men.  Even though the men admitted the rape to authorities, two grand juries subsequently declined to indict the men, meaning no charges were ever brought against her six assailants.

In 2011, the Alabama House of Representatives apologized on behalf of the state “for its failure to prosecute her attackers.” Taylor’s rape and the subsequent court cases were among the first instances of nationwide protest and activism among the African American community, and ended up providing an early organizational spark for the Civil Rights Movement. from Wikipedia


What makes some men sexual harassers? Science tries to explain the creeps of the world.

By William Wan – The Washington Post

The list of alleged sexual harassers keeps getting longer and the details of sexual assault and harassment ever more disturbing. The torrent of cases pouring out in news reports and Twitter— tales of men grabbing women, emerging naked from showers uninvited, threatening women’s careers, or worse — raises a horrified question: What makes these men behave this way? Continue reading

 

 


THANK YOU ALABAMA! “The Karma’s Gonna Come On Down” by Lytingale

 
Angry old white man sittin’ in a tower.

Angry old white men sittin’ on the bench.

Angry old white men clingin’ to your power

But the karma’s gonna come on down.

Lies are lies, not alternative facts.

Lies are lies, and the truth’ll come out.

Lies are lies, you better clean up your act

Cause the karma’s gonna come on down

(Chorus:)

The karma’s gonna come on down.

The karma’s gonna come on down real soon.

Do unto others what you want done to you,

Cause the karma’s gonna come on down.  Oh, yeah.


Let’s Talk About Sex–And Reproductive Justice

BY AMIE NEWMAN | OUR BODIES OURSELVES

Thanks to the reproductive justice collective SisterSong and the group’s allies and partners, reproductive justice is a phrase and a concept well-known within the reproductive health and rights movement. But it wasn’t always that way. In 1994, a group of Black women issued a very public call to action in the Washington Post demanding that the healthcare needs of the most marginalized be included in President Clinton’s healthcare reform legislation. Specifically, they demanded universal health care and spoke to the necessity for Black women’s access to reproductive health care. They called reproductive freedom “a life and death issue for many Black women” and said it “deserves as much recognition as any other freedom.” The group, Women of African Descent for Reproductive Justice, helped catapult these ideas and organized Black women around the country in support of reproductive justice and the intersection of human rights and reproductive rights for women of color.  Continue reading

Asheville, NC Current Weather
64°
clear sky
humidity: 48%
wind: 14mph N
H 66 • L 64
60°
Thu
60°
Fri
62°
Sat
Weather from OpenWeatherMap

Subscribe to Articles