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Women's Lives & Education

Why study women, minorities, or other controversial subjects at all? The answer is: a good liberal education (liberal as in “freedom”) teaches people to think both “inside the box” and “outside the box”.  Gender studies programs can encourage students to creatively examine their surroundings and learn to identify both the empowering and dis-empowering properties of words and deeds and to consider the relationship of race, gender, class and ethnicity as well as the manifestation and effects of gender bias in society.   Your suggestions and submissions are welcomed.
Research on Women and Education     Women’s Media Center     OnTrack Women’s Financial Empowerment Center     The Community Foundation of WNC – Women for Women grants     Western Women’s Business Center     Womansong of Asheville Women’s Chorus & New Start Program

Fear of Jane Austen

When the Bank of England announced last month its intention to portray Jane Austen on its ten-pound note, it seemed the most uncontroversial of choices. Who better than Austen to stand as a representative of female accomplishment? Many of the female historical figures that might have been chosen were shocking in their time: consider Mary Wollstonecraft and Florence Nightingale. And most still have an air of scandal about them, their subsequent canonization notwithstanding. Continue reading


ACN & AHS seek to leverage their strengths to save even more lives of our community’s neediest animals

 

ACN & AHS seek to leverage their strengths to save even more lives of our community’s neediest animals

 

 

Animal Compassion Network (ACN) and Asheville Humane Society (AHS) today announced they are integrating their teams and talents to strengthen and expand their capability to save and serve more of Buncombe County’s neediest animals. “Small committees from each of our volunteer board of directors have been meeting for several months to look at ways we can work together most efficiently, effectively and creatively to the benefit of the most vulnerable animals in Buncombe County,” said Katherine Shenar, President/CEO of Asheville Humane Society.

 

 

 

“Some years ago, our culture of being a ‘safe for life’ agency and AHS’s commitment to being a shelter open to every homeless animal could not have meshed,” said Eileen Bouressa, Executive Director of Animal Compassion Network, “but for over two years AHS has rehomed every healthy, behaviorally sound animal who has come into the Buncombe County Animal Shelter, a remarkable achievement for an open admission shelter. The goals of ACN and AHS to help save animals have always been the same. By merging our operations we can work synergistically and with less redundancy for the greater good of all animals in our community.”

 

 

 

“The next challenge in Buncombe County is to rehabilitate and rehome more of those animals that come through our doors as ‘unadoptable.’ These animals can now be saved with special care, time in a foster home, rehabilitative programs, training, or transport to an area with more available homes,” said Shenar. “Asheville Humane Society is already saving over 1,300 of those special needs animals each year; with a creative and dedicated partner like ACN, we can now provide more services to our community while saving more lives.”

 

 

 

The combined organizations will be housed under one roof at Asheville Humane Society’s Nancy Hiscoe Clark Adoption and Education Center. Asheville Humane Society runs the Adoption Center with donated funds and operates, under contract, the adjacent Buncombe County Animal Shelter.

 

Asheville Humane Society is the largest and oldest lifesaving organization for homeless animals in Western North Carolina, and saved 4,519 animals last year. Animal Compassion Network, founded in 1997, is the first “safe for life” animal welfare organization in this area, and saved 1,000 animals last year.

 

In rescue,

Eileen & Lauren

Eileen Bouressa

ACN Executive Director

 

Lauren Weldishofer

Marketing & Events Manager


Women’s Lives: Join Us on Women’s Advocacy Day April 9

Join Us on Women’s Advocacy Day

Are you ready? Come to Raleigh on Tuesday, April 9!

  • Hear Kim Gandy talk about her history of working for women, especially in the area of Violence Against Women
  • Hear representatives from NCWU member organizations talk about other issues of concern.
  • Join with others from your district and across the state to speak to your legislators about the issues of most concern to you
  • If you are free Monday evening, join us for a special reception in honor of Ms. Gandy and focused on the issues of violence against women

Registration is open! Please let us know you are coming!

Women’s Advocacy Day and the reception are free and open to the public, though space is limited at the reception. Donors to NCWU will be recognized at the reception with special recognition for those contributing at least $75 (bronze), $150 (silver) and $250 (gold). Please consider a donation to help our efforts.

MAKERS; Women Who Make America

This video tells the remarkable story of the most sweeping social revolution in American history, as women have asserted their rights to a full and fair share of political power, economic opportunity, and personal autonomy.  It’s a revolution that has unfolded in public and private, in courts and Congress, in the boardroom and the bedroom, changing not only what the world expects from women, but what women expect from themselves. Click here for the video

Gloria Steinem, longtime feminist and founder of Ms. Magazine, talks with PBS NewsHour Senior Correspondent Judy Woodruff on Tuesday, February 26, 2013.

They’ll discuss the women’s movement and the renewed debate over whether women can “have it all.” They’ll explore how far women have come and the challenges ahead. To what extent are women responsible for their own success? What role do governments and employers play? Check your local listings for PBS NewsHour.

Steinem is featured in the PBS documentary, “MAKERS: Women Who Make America.” It examines the sweeping social revolution, as women have taken larger and more prominent roles in political, economic and social arenas. The documentary tells the stories of trailblazing women whose work has altered nearly every aspect of American culture. “MAKERS” airs on February 26th at 8:00 P.M. Eastern time on PBS.

Anne D. Bell
Public Relations Manager
PBS NEWSHOUR
2700 South Quincy St.; Suite 250
Arlington, VA 22206
Office – (703) 998-2175
@AnneBell

 


Women In Combat

Women In Combat

 

Cheryl is a retired Air Force officer, living and writing in Asheville, NC. Her book, In Formation: What the Air Force Taught Me about Holding On and Manning Up is awaiting publication. You can read more of her work at www.cheryldietrich.net.

Last week, the Pentagon announced plans to open combat positions to women. This seems an appropriate time to give you my take on the subject, as written in my book, In Formation. Part of this post was published in the anthology Birthed from Scorched Hearts: Women Respond to War (compiled and edited by MariJo Moore, Fulcrum Publishing, 2008). Click here to read the entire blog entry


“Our Bodies, Ourselves” Part of Library of Congress’s “Books that Shaped America” Exhibit

“Our Bodies, Ourselves” Part of Library of Congress’s “Books that Shaped America” Exhibit

The original edition of “Our Bodies, Ourselves” has been named one of the Library of Congress’s “Books that Shaped America,” a list of important works “intended to spark a national conversation on books written by Americans that have influenced our lives.” click here to read more


WMC Feature: Misogynistic Ads and the Oxygen of Publicity

Retro-sexist advertising may be presented as ironic, but it features the same, familiar images feminists rallied against decades ago, argues the author. What to do?

Compare two advertisements—both use a picture of a young, attractive, white woman to sell their product. Both women look sweetly perplexed and nervous. One, for the Mini Automatic, is taglined “For Simple Driving” and shows the model clutching a steering wheel and biting her lip, daunted at the task of driving a car. The other, for a Samsung camera, is taglined “Too Smart For Amy” with its model holding up the product and pouting adorably, eyes wide with confusion to show she is completely flummoxed by this complex piece of technology. Can you guess which one was made in 1970 and which one was released in 2012? Me neither.  Click here to read the entire article


Join Me on the Bridge! International Women’s Day…all year long

Rwanda and Congo are two neighbouring countries that have been torn apart by the worst atrocities of war that the world has seen in recent years. The rape and torture of women as a weapon of war is commonplace.The women from the opposing sides of war in these communities came together to say No to war and Yes to peace, and to show how they could build the bridges of peace for the future. To show their support, women have stood with them on hundreds of bridges across the world from Sydney to Paris, and Accra to Ontario.  Click here “to build bridges of peace and hope for the future” If not this year what about next year?  Write SheVille if you are interested!    info@sheville.org




Women Who Shaped America

The Women’s Rights Movement would not have been what it was — and still is — without Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony. During an era in which women were thought to be their husband’s property, Stanton and Anthony challenged the notion that women were not equal. America saw drastic change in civil rights in the 19th century, when freed slaves had been given the right to vote. Women, on the other hand, did not have the right to vote, or rights in a divorce, or the right to have custody of their children, or a fair share of their property. Click here to read the entire article

This article was contributed to SheVille by Alison Fitzpatrick


WHO Releases Global Report on Health Effects of Violence Against Women

The World Health Organization has released a new report, “Global and regional estimates of violence against women: prevalence and health effects of intimate partner violence and non-partner sexual violence,” [PDF] that attempts to quantify how many women around the world are exposed to physical and sexual violence at some point in their lives, and describes many of the associated poor health outcomes.

The findings are probably not surprising, but they are still disturbing.

WHO reports that 35 percent of women worldwide — more than 1 in 3 — have been physically and/or sexually abused. These figures do not include emotional/psychological abuse.  Continue Reading

 


Girls’ State of the Union

Women’s Media Center Video Contest Shines a Light on Girls

Girls’ State of the Union is a Women’s Media Center video contest that shines a light on girls as problem solvers and media leaders. Like the President’s State of the Union address, the Girls’ State of the Union lets girls tell us what our priorities should be. Judges for this contest include Gloria Steinem, Carol Jenkins, Kyra Sedgewick, Marisa Tomei, and an all-star list of social media leaders. The winning address will be featured at a special event at the National Press Club in Washington, DC.  Click here for the video


Women’s History: The New York Times Reviews “Our Bodies, Ourselves”

Women’s History: The New York Times Reviews “Our Bodies, Ourselves”

 

Forty years ago today, The New York Times reviewed “Our Bodies, Ourselves” under the headline “Thinking About the Thinkable.”

 

It’s fascinating to see how the book was received in the mainstream press — and, in this case, how one of the most prominent book reviewers of the late 20th century, Christopher Lehmann-Haupt, approached the text.  Click here to read the entire article

 

 


Global Alert for Women’s Lives – Witch Burnings in Papua New Guinea 2013!

Global Alert for Women’s Lives – Witch Burnings in Papua New Guinea in 2013!

First delivered on “Women’s Media Center Live with Robin Morgan,” this “Fighting Words” commentary demands action in response to a horrifying news story reported by journalist Jo Chandler.

This is breaking news. A warning: it’s grim, but not ignorable. A journalist named Jo Chandler has been reporting it from Papua New Guinea (PNG), for The Global Mail. She’s an award-winning correspondent who’s risking her life by reporting on witch burnings there. Yes, you heard correctly, the burning alive of women accused of witchcraft. And no, this is not Europe in the Middle Ages. Click here to read the entire article


Human Trafficking Bill Resurrected in Congress

Human Trafficking Bill Resurrected in Congress

This week the Senate took care of the unfinished business of reauthorizing legislation to combat the crime of trafficking, including services for domestic victims. Now it’s up to the House.

The Senate applied the buddy system this week to shepherd anti-human trafficking legislation through the system. Senator Patrick Leahy (D-VT) attached the Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act (TVPRA) as an amendment to the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA).  Click to read the entire article


She’s Beautiful When She’s Angry: New Documentary on History of the Women’s Movement

She’s Beautiful When She’s Angry: New Documentary on History of the Women’s Movement

A new documentary, “She’s Beautiful When She’s Angry,” chronicles the history of the women’s movement from 1966 to 1972, including the genesis of Our Bodies Ourselves, the founding of NOW, and other historical milestones.

The filmmakers are running a Kickstarter campaign to raise funds to finish the project, and have a little more than a month to go. Check it out to learn more about the project and consider supporting their efforts. Click here for the entire article


The Listening Project – National and International

A Listening Project (LP) is a comprehensive process that includes deep listening interviews and community organizing that can result in cooperative community education and action on a wide range of issues and concerns. LPs are especially useful in communities where conflict, divisions or disempowerment weakens efforts for positive change. They can help organizations successfully address injustice, conflict, community development, health, environmental and others concerns.

What It Does

  • Identifies problems and issues that people care about.

  • Includes often unheard or unheeded voices.

  • Fosters emergence and development of new community leaders.

  • Generates creative solutions for community needs and problems.

  • Disseminates issue-related information and determines needs for additional information.

  • Encourages personal growth as all involved consider new viewpoints and information.

  • Forms uncommon coalitions and alliances through which diverse viewpoints can resolve – rather than clash over – difficult issues.

  • Promotes insight, empathy, and understanding among people with conflicting views.

  • Creates long-term capacity for grassroots community building.  Click here to read more


Sex, lies and media: New wave of activists challenge notions of beauty

Here’s the fantasy: A half-naked woman lies across a couch, lips pouty and cleavage prominent as her sultry gaze implores you to buy this bottle of perfume.The reality: Women make up 51% of the United States yet only 17% of seats in the House of Representatives. They’re 3% of Fortune 500 CEOs and 7% of directors in the top 250 grossing films.  Click here to read the entire article


What Did Egyptian Women Gain from Arab Spring Uprising?

Sherine Hafez and Jessica Winegar examine the role and future of Egyptian women in the Arab Spring Uprising in this quarter’s American Ethnologist by authoring personal accounts of women during the revolution. From the thicket of peaceful protest in Tahrir Square to tending to the domestic duties during such an uncertain time, many obstacles have challenged the role of women in politics.

Jessica Winegar, sociocultural anthropologist and Assistant Professor at Northwestern University, examines the responsibilities of women during the uprising. Professor Winegar was in Cairo during the uprising, however, like many women, she could not attend the protest due to family obligations in the home. “I call attention to the way that revolution is experienced and undertaken in domestic spaces, through different forms of affect, in ways deeply inflected by gender and class,” says Winegar in her article The Privilege of Revolution: Gender, class, space, and affect in Egypt.

Sherine Hafez, ethnographer and Assistant Professor at the University of California Riverside, takes an in-depth look at the role of women after the uprising to surprisingly find this role remains the same, in her article No Longer a Bargain: Women, Masculinity, and the Egyptian Uprising. She notes that “what the events of this uprising have revealed is that notions of masculinity undermined by a repressive regime have observably shifted the terms of the patriarchal bargain.”


American Ethnologist
, a quarterly journal produced by the American Ethnological Society (AES), in its February 2012 issue features these articles on the Arab Spring uprising in Egypt. The nine authors are anthropologists with a wide range of specialties who have years of research experience in Egypt. The online and print editions are currently available. Articles and abstracts are available at www.americanethnologist.org

This journal is edited by Angelique Haugerud of Rutgers University and its content deals with all facets of ethnology in the broadest sense of the term. Articles creatively demonstrate the connections between ethnographic specificity and theoretical originality, as well as the ongoing relevance of the ethnographic imagination to the contemporary world.

The American Ethnological Society, founded in 1842, sponsors the journal American Ethnologist. AES is a section of the American Anthropological Association.

-American Anthropological Association-
Founded in 1902, the American Anthropological Association is the world’s largest professional organization of anthropologists and others interested in anthropology, with an average annual membership of more than 10,000. The Arlington, VA – based association represents all specialties within anthropology – cultural anthropology, biological (or physical) anthropology, archaeology, linguistics and applied anthropology.

Media Resources:
American Ethnologist:  www.americanethnologist.org

AE Online Issue:  http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/amet.2012.39.issue-1/issuetoc

Sherine Hafez:  http://bit.ly/z30gq3

Jessica Winegar:  http://bit.ly/AiiQ2E

Angelique Haugerud, Editor, American Ethnologist:  http://bit.ly/wEByYO

American Ethnologist Society:  www.aesonline.org

Contact:
Joslyn Osten, Marketing and Public Relations Manager
American Anthropological Association, 2200 Wilson Blvd., Suite 600, Arlington, VA 22201-3357
(T) 703/528-1902 x1171, (F) 703/528-3546, josten@aaanet.org


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