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Women's Lives & Education

Why study women, minorities, or other controversial subjects at all? The answer is: a good liberal education (liberal as in “freedom”) teaches people to think both “inside the box” and “outside the box”.  Gender studies programs can encourage students to creatively examine their surroundings and learn to identify both the empowering and dis-empowering properties of words and deeds and to consider the relationship of race, gender, class and ethnicity as well as the manifestation and effects of gender bias in society.   Your suggestions and submissions are welcomed.
Research on Women and Education     Women’s Media Center     OnTrack Women’s Financial Empowerment Center     The Community Foundation of WNC – Women for Women grants     Western Women’s Business Center     Womansong of Asheville Women’s Chorus & New Start Program

GIRLS ROCK Asheville is now an official 501(c)(3) non-profit organization!

Our Mission

“Girls Rock Asheville is a nonprofit camp dedicated to empowering girls, trans* youth and ladies of all backgrounds and abilities through music education. As mentors, we provide a supportive space to encourage participants to express themselves through performance, positive identity development, musical experimentation, peer collaboration and DIY production.” 


The First National Women’s Rights Convention

The first national Women’s Rights Convention opened in Worcester, Massachusetts October 23, 1850. Two years earlier, Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Lucretia Mott had launched the woman suffrage movement with their hastily organized Seneca Falls Convention in New York. They published the Declaration of Sentiments, using language modeled after the Declaration of Independence, to call for voting rights for women. They also expressed a hope that conventions for women’s rights would continue to be held at regular intervals.


10 Historic Women Photographers You Should Know

Let’s get our art history on.

Next month, Sotheby’s will bring a broad array of photography to the auction block, illuminating the impressive range of the medium through a survey of Modern and Post-War image makers. While audiences will get their fair share of the men who helped changed the history of photos — think Bill Brandt, Robert Frank, Weegee, Alfred Stieglitz and Ansel Adams — some of the most impressive names in the bunch belong to the 20th and 21st century women who have brought the art of photography to new heights. Continue reading


FACING RACE SPOTLIGHT: Organizer Alicia Garza on Why Black Lives Matter

Alicia Garza calls Oakland home but is one of the many black organizers who’ve flocked to Ferguson, Missouri, in the aftermath of the police killing of 18-year-old Michael Brown. For Garza, who serves as special projects director at the National Domestic Workers Alliance, her presence in Ferguson gave her the opportunity to support local activists as they worked to build sustainable leadership. It was also a chance to put into action a saying that’s become somewhat of a movement slogan in recent months: “Black Lives Matter.”  Continue reading


Sexy Bratz Dolls Get Gentle Make-Unders Courtesy of Tasmanian Artist

Sexy Bratz Dolls Get Gentle Make-Unders Courtesy of Tasmanian Artist

The hyper-sexualization of children’s toys (especially Bratz Dolls) make many of us very uncomfortable. In fact, when a new Bratz movie came into the video store I worked in once, a custome legitimately asked if it was a new animated porno he could rent. So these make-unders done by a Tasmanian artist who “rescues and rehabs” these dolls and then poses them doing things that actual young girls might do, like hiding in trees and chilling on swings. Continue reading  This article was sent in by Shiner Antiorio


WNC HISTORY: The Establishment of Rosenwald Schools

 

In the 1920s, the president of Sears, Roebuck and Co, Julius Rosenwald, created a fund to build schools in the rural areas of 15 southern states to enable black children to get an education during segregation. The schools were financed with matching grants from the Rosenwald fund, local governments and the local black communities. The Rosenwald School building program is recognized as one of the most important partnerships to advance African-American education in the early 20thcentury.


WESTERN CAROINA UNIVERSITY Intercultural Affairs Department

Western Carolina University’s Department of Intercultural Affairs is located in the A.K. Hinds University Center. The mission of Intercultural Affairs is to provide an inclusive environment that examines, recognizes, accepts, and affirms human differences and similarities related to national origin, religion, gender, disability, race/ethnicity, sexual orientation, age, and socioeconomic status. The Department of Intercultural Affairs contributes to a culturally rich campus through advocacy, diversity and social justice education, leadership and the development of global citizens. Intercultural Affairs provides lectures, cultural awareness programs, films, and workshops to promote social justice and cultural competency as well as to respond to acts of discrimination and bias.

 Click here for the department’s website

Department of Intercultural Affairs | Western Carolina University | A.K. Hinds University Center | Cullowhee, NC 28723

 


Girls Rock Asheville is now an official 501(c)(3) non-profit organization!

Our Mission

“Girls Rock Asheville is a nonprofit camp dedicated to empowering girls, trans* youth and ladies of all backgrounds and abilities through music education. As mentors, we provide a supportive space to encourage participants to express themselves through performance, positive identity development, musical experimentation, peer collaboration and DIY production.”

Asheville, NC. Girls Rock Asheville is proud to announce our official 501(c)(3) non-profit status.

From President Erin Kinard: “Having our 501(c)(3) status will help us pursue our mission by making us eligible for grants, saving us money, and enabling our donors to write off their contributions.”

Girls Rock Asheville has just completed our second year of camp with exciting plans in development for the coming year, including ladies rock camp, an after school program, and dynamic monthly events that encourage community engagement. Attainment of official non-profit status enables our organization to accomplish more and grow in a sustainable way, while providing a solid bedrock for girls and trans* youth to grow in confidence and leadership.

“Asheville, a city with strong progressive roots, has been overwhelmingly supportive of our mission and vision, and we look forward to thriving while filling a vital role in our community,” says Kinard. “In addition to the gratitude we have toward our Asheville supporters, we also thank Girls Rock Charleston for being our fiscal sponsors during the approval process.”

Girls Rock Asheville is a nonprofit camp dedicated to empowering girls, trans* youth and ladies of all backgrounds and abilities through music education. As mentors, we provide a supportive space to encourage participants to express themselves through performance, positive identity development, musical experimentation, peer collaboration and DIY production.

To find out more about Girls Rock Asheville, please visit our website- www.girlsrockasheville.org, and our Facebook page. For more information, contact Erin Kinard at girlsrockasheville@gmail.com.

 

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Annual announcement of the New-England Female Medical College (detail of title page), 1860, Francis A. Countway Library, Harvard Medical School

Boston Female Medical College 1848

The first medical school for women opened in Boston, Massachusetts, on this date in 1848. It was started by Samuel Gregory, who named it the Boston Female Medical College. The first class – 12 women in all – graduated just two years later, in 1850. Gregory’s own formal medical training consisted of a summer lecture course that he had taken in anatomy and physiology. He wasn’t remotely a supporter of women’s rights, but he believed it was unseemly for male doctors to assist women in childbirth, so the college was mostly intended to serve as a school for midwives at first. In 1856, the school’s name was changed to the New England Female Medical College; it named among its graduates Rebecca Lee Crumper, the first African-American to earn a medical degree, which she did in 1864.  Continue reading


Ellen Craft, the Slave Who Posed as a Master and Made Herself Free

Ellen Craft, the Slave Who Posed as a Master and Made Herself Free

A few days before Christmas, 1848, a man named William Craft gave his wife Ellen a haircut—in fact, he cut it to the nape of her neck, far shorter than any other woman in Macon, Georgia, where the Crafts lived. They picked out her clothes—a cravat, a top hat, a fine coat—and went over the plan for what felt like the hundredth time.

Ellen was scared. “I think it is almost too much for us to undertake; however, I feel that God is on our side,” she would later write, “and with his assistance, notwithstanding all the difficulties, we shall be able to succeed.” Illustration by Jim Cooke, source image via Getty  Continue reading


AB TECHNICAL COMMUNITY COLLEGE Women’s Studies

Introduction to Women’s Studies, American Women’s Studies, and Women and History survey the experience of women in historical perspective; include the experiences and contributions of women in culture, politics, economics, science, and religion; and provide an inter-disciplinary study of the history, literature, and social roles of American women from Colonial times to the present.


UNC ASHEVILLE Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies

UNC Asheville Women’s Studies seeks to understand the diversity of women’s experiences through an interdisciplinary program of teaching, service and research.

UNC Asheville Women’s Studies seeks to understand the diversity of women’s experiences through an interdisciplinary program of teaching, service and research.  Women’s Studies courses and electives explore the experiences of women and investigate the complex phenomenon of gender.  Courses promote student investigation of women’s diverse experiences from the perspective of the various social sciences, sciences and humanities.  Emerging from an activist tradition, Women’s Studies seeks to provide resources to the university and the broader community by providing an on-going array of co-curricular activities for students and community members.  We act as a resource and guide on issues relating to women through community activism and service by encouraging interdisciplinary techniques and by being wholly cognizant of the interaction of gender and diversity. 828.251.6419 Visit our Website


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