Sheville

Get Free Email Updates!

Get progressive community news & events delivered straight to your inbox.

I agree to have my personal information transfered to MailChimp ( more information )

I will never give away, trade or sell your email address. You can unsubscribe at any time.

Friends of the Smokies Presents “Books to Take Backpacking”

History, poetry, and children’s literature inspired by the Great Smoky Mountains will be featured in “Books to Take Backpacking,” presented by the Friends of Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Historian Margaret Brown, poet Thomas Rain Crowe, and children’s author Ann Clayton will read from their works at 3 p.m.Sunday, April 15, at Malaprop’s Bookstore and Café, 55 Haywood St in downtown Asheville. This “Writers at Home” event will encourage and inspire stewardship of the Great Smoky Mountains, and is free and open to the public.

 

 

Brown, an assistant professor of history at Brevard College, will read from “The Wild East: ABiography of the Great Smoky Mountains.” Widely considered the authoritative text on the history of Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GSMNP), the book explores the social, political, and environmental changes in the Great Smoky Mountains from the time of the Cherokee to the creation of the National Park. Brown also co-authored “Historic Buildings of the Smokies” and “Hiking Trails of the Smokies.”

 

Crowe is an internationally-published poet and the author of thirty books of original and translated works, including his award winning memoir, “Zoro’s Field: My Life in the Appalachian Woods,” and his most recent book of essays and articles, “The End of Eden: Writings of an Environmental Activist.” Crowe will read from his work appearing in “Every Breath Sings Mountains,” a series chapbook focusing on the Great Smoky Mountains published by Voices From the American Land in 2011.

 

Clayton is a volunteer with GSMNP Elk Bugle Corps in Cataloochee Valley, where she“talks elk” with Park visitors. Clayton will read from her children’s book, “Bully for You, Elk 22,” based on the story of a Cataloochee elk. She is also the author of “Good Morning Goldfish,” a story written for professionals working with children with behavioral disorders, inspired by her career in education advocating for children. She has had articles and photographs published in Adventures in the Smokies, Carolina Country, and Smoky Mountain Living.

 

The Writers at Home Series is sponsored by UNC Asheville’s Great Smokies Writing Program. For more information about this reading or the Friends of theGreat Smoky Mountains National Park, contact hollyd@friendsofthesmokies.org or 828-452-0720, or visit www.friendsofthesmokies.org.

SheVille Team

We are a one-of-a-kind magazine that provides local, regional, national and international information about women’s lives and education, performing and visual arts and writing, the environment, green living and sustainability and regional Western North Carolina business, people and events. “Villages preserve culture: dress, food and dance are a few examples. As villages grow in population and turn into towns, local cafes make way for large American chains. Handmade leather sandals are discarded for a pair of Western sneakers. Due to its small size, a village fosters a tight-knit sense of community. Justpeace.org explains the meaning of the African proverb, “It takes a village,” by stating that a sense of community is critical to maintaining a healthy society. Village members hold a wealth of information regarding their heritage: they know about the ancient traditions, methods of production and the resources of the land. When villages become dispersed or exterminated in times of war, this anthropological knowledge disappears. Large cities are not as conducive to growing and producing foods such as fruits and vegetables. Villages, on the other hand, usually have ample amounts of land and other resources necessary for growing conditions.” The Importance of Villages by Catherine Capozzi Our Mission SheVille.org provides readers with information important to women’s lives and well-being. We focus primarily on the areas of education & health, business & finance, the arts & the environment. We are particularly interested in local & regional resources, organizations & events.
Asheville, NC Current Weather
80°
thunderstorm
humidity: 78%
wind: 7mph SE
H 76 • L 72
77°
Tue
77°
Wed
73°
Thu
Weather from OpenWeatherMap

Subscribe to Articles