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History-Making Women – Women’s Media

 
This year, the Women’s Media Center celebrates 10 years of working to make women visible and powerful in media.In honor of this milestone we have pulled some articles from our WMC Features archives that tell the stories of history-making women — mothering change — on the road to equality.
In 2005, Jane Fonda, Robin Morgan and Gloria Steinem founded the Women’s Media Center to train, promote, monitor, and create media for women, by women, about women.
 
In 2006, Alida Brill wrote a WMC Feature about a founding mother of the contemporary women’s movement: Betty Friedan, Map-Maker. Janus Adams wrote A Garland for Coretta Scott King. Our Founding WMC President, Carol Jenkins, chronicled Katie Couric‘s first day as the first woman anchor of a national network news broadcast.

 

Photo Credit: Jenny Warburg

In 2007, WMC board member, Gloria Feldt, witnessed Nancy Pelosi take the gavel as the first woman to serve as Speaker of the US House of Representatives.

 

 

 

In 2008, Peggy Simpson gave us: Clinton, Paul, and Couric How Barriers Fall. She included these inspiring words from Hillary Clinton, “Always aim high, work hard, and care deeply about what you believe in. When you stumble, keep faith. When you’re knocked down, get right back up. And never listen to anyone who says you can’t or shouldn’t go on.” Support the Women’s Media Center for 10 more years!

 

 In 2009, Paula J. Giddings, wrote that Ida B. Wells — antilynching activist, suffragist, settlement-house founder, and journalist — was the first activist to publicly articulate the relationship between racial violence and racial progress (and much, much more) in What Would Ida Do? Emily Wilson celebrated the first woman of color in Congress:  Patsy Mink: Paving the Way

Image of Ida B. Wells

Ida B. Wells

 

 

In 2010, WMC Co-Founder, Gloria Steinem, wrote about the first woman elected Chief of the Chief of the Cherokee Nation in Leaders as Guides of Return:  Wilma Mankiller and Debbie Hines marked the nomination of Elana Kagan as the fourth woman to serve on the U.S. Supreme Court, noting that the trailblazing leader had already made history as the first female solicitor general of the United States and as the first female dean of the Harvard Law School.
 
In 2011,  Patricia Sullivan reported the early sex discrimination court battle and long path to the appointment of the first woman executive editor of The New York Times in Jill Abramson — A Breakthrough at The New York Times, Decades in the Making. Support the Women’s Media Center for 10 more years!
 
In 2012, Elayne Clift celebrated Aung San Suu Kyi’s acceptance of the Nobel Peace Prize — two decades after it was awarded — and told her personal stories of Burma in Burmese Nobel Laureate After 21 Years and WMC Co-Founder, Robin Morgan, interviewed Mazie Hirono, Hawaii’s First Woman Senator.

 
 
 
In 2013, the first Latina on the US Supreme Court, Sonia Sotomayor, was featured in Sotomayor–From the Bronx to the Bench by Emily Wilson.
 
In 2014, WMC Co-Founder, Robin Morgan, brought together a roundtable of four distinguished journalists, all members of the WMC board of directors—Soraya Chemaly, Carol Jenkins, Geneva Overholser, and Gloria Steinem— to delve into the implications of The New York Times’ firing of The Times’ first woman executive editor, Jill Abramson.
 
In 2015 — our 10th year — Shazia Z. Rafi gave us a progress report on the global status of women in leadership and reminded us of the crucial vision and leadership of Bella Abzug in organizing international platforms to create goals for the global movement in Who Runs The World? Support the Women’s Media Center for 10 more years!
 
Over the past decade, we have given women journalists and activists the Women’s Media Center story-telling platform.  Our WMC Features cover important issues by and about women.  Our reports and commentaries provide progressive women’s perspectives on both headline stories and timely events ignored or misrepresented in the mainstream media.  National and international contributors — widely diverse — include members of the Women’s Media Center Board of Directors, WMC Progressive Women’s Voices alumnae, WMC SheSource participants, and many others, all using our platform to influence the global discussion – and all paid honoraria in respect for their writing.  They offer our audience must-know information to move forward making change. 
 
As you celebrate the women in your life this weekend, please consider giving a contribution to the Women’s Media Center in honor of them — we will use your gift to advance our work to make women visible and powerful in the media and to chronicle the issues, campaigns, and history-making women — mothering change — on the road to equality.
 

With appreciation,
 
Julie Burton
President, Women’s Media Center    Please help support the Women’s Media Center

SheVille Team

We are a one-of-a-kind magazine that provides local, regional, national and international information about women’s lives and education, performing and visual arts and writing, the environment, green living and sustainability and regional Western North Carolina business, people and events. “Villages preserve culture: dress, food and dance are a few examples. As villages grow in population and turn into towns, local cafes make way for large American chains. Handmade leather sandals are discarded for a pair of Western sneakers. Due to its small size, a village fosters a tight-knit sense of community. Justpeace.org explains the meaning of the African proverb, “It takes a village,” by stating that a sense of community is critical to maintaining a healthy society. Village members hold a wealth of information regarding their heritage: they know about the ancient traditions, methods of production and the resources of the land. When villages become dispersed or exterminated in times of war, this anthropological knowledge disappears. Large cities are not as conducive to growing and producing foods such as fruits and vegetables. Villages, on the other hand, usually have ample amounts of land and other resources necessary for growing conditions.” The Importance of Villages by Catherine Capozzi Our Mission SheVille.org provides readers with information important to women’s lives and well-being. We focus primarily on the areas of education & health, business & finance, the arts & the environment. We are particularly interested in local & regional resources, organizations & events.
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