African Methodist Episcopal Church’s First Woman Bishop to Speak at Truett Seminary at Baylor

Written by Jean Cassidy on . Posted in Making a Difference

African Methodist Episcopal Church’s First Woman Bishop to Speak at Truett Seminary at Baylor

 

WACO, Texas (Aug. 22, 2012) — The Right Rev. Vashti McKenzie — a former journalist and broadcaster who broke the “stained-glass ceiling” when she was elected the first female bishop in the African Methodist Episcopal Church’s 200-year history – will speak on Tuesday, Aug. 28, at George W. Truett Theological Seminary at Baylor University.

McKenzie’s election in 2000 to serve the 18th Episcopal District of the AME Church, which includes the four sub-Saharan African countries Lesotho, Botswana, Mozambique and Swaziland, was hailed as a symbol of hope and change for the oldest and one of the largest historically black denominations.

She has been named twice to Ebony Magazine’s “Honor Roll of Great African American Preachers” and also has been honored by Ebony on its list of “15 Greatest African American Female Preachers.”

In 2005, McKenzie made further history when she became the first woman president of the denomination’s Council of Bishops, making her the highest-ranking woman in the predominately black Methodist denomination.

Five weeks ago, she became the bishop of the 10th Episcopal District of the AME Church, a district which includes Texas. McKenzie said her  initial focus will be “Imagine AME: God Is Able to Do More than We Think, Ask, or Imagine (Ephesians 3:20).”

“This is an opportunity to redefine our ministries and teach new traditions,” she said. “We will be looking at our strategy statewide.”

The Rev. Joel Gregory, Ph.D., a professor of preaching at Truett, said some members of the AME denomination are enrolled at Truett.

“They are excellent students,” said Gregory, former president of the Baptist General Convention Texas and founder of Joel Gregory Ministries. “We want to affirm our ties with the AME, our common ground.”

The bishop is the author of the books Not Without a Struggle, Strength in the Struggle, Leadership Development for Women, A Journey to the Well and Swapping Housewives: Rachel and Jacob and Leah.

In sub-Sahara African countries, she opened a not-for-profit computer center, provided scholarships and expanded services and group homes for children orphaned or abandoned by the HIV/Aids pandemic.

During McKenzie’s journalistic career, her roles have included a radio program director, an on-air personality, a city desk reporter, a staff writer and a corporate vice president of programming.

She is the wife of Stan McKenzie, a missions supervisor in the AME church and a former player in the National Basketball Association.

McKenzie’s address on Tuesday will be during chapel from 9:30 a.m. to 10:20 a.m. in Paul W. Powell Chapel at Truett Seminary, 1100 S. Third St. in Waco. The service is open to the public.

ABOUT BAYLOR UNIVERSITY
Baylor University is a private Christian university and a nationally ranked research institution, characterized as having “high research activity” by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. The university provides a vibrant campus community for approximately 15,000 students by blending interdisciplinary research with an international reputation for educational excellence and a faculty commitment to teaching and scholarship. Chartered in 1845 by the Republic of Texas through the efforts of Baptist pioneers, Baylor is the oldest continually operating university in Texas. Located in Waco, Baylor welcomes students from all 50 states and more than 80 countries to study a broad range of degrees among its 11 nationally recognized academic divisions. Baylor sponsors 19 varsity athletic teams and is a founding member of the Big 12 Conference.


ABOUT GEORGE W. TRUETT THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY

Baylor University’s George W. Truett Theological Seminary provides theological education leading to the Master of Divinity, the Doctor of Ministry or the Master of Theological Studies degree that is centered in the gospel of Jesus Christ and consistent with historic Baptist commitments to prepare persons to carry this gospel to the churches and the world. Within the M.Div. degree program, students can choose concentrations in Biblical Studies and Theology, Christian Education, Ministry Leadership, Missions and World Christianity, Worship Leadership and Youth/Family/Student Ministry. Truett Seminary also offers two Dual Degree programs - M.Div./MSW and MTS/MSW - through a partnership with Baylor’s School of Social Work and an M.Div./Master of Music through a partnership with the Baylor University School of Music. Visit www.baylor.edu/truett to learn more.

Burmese Nobel Laureate after 21 Years

Written by Elayne Clift and the Women's Media Center on . Posted in Making a Difference

The author recalls her time in Burma just before the military coup that kept Aung San Suu Kyi from accepting her Nobel Peace Prize for two decades.

“Absolute peace in our world is an unattainable goal,” the diminutive woman in lavender said softly. “Even if we do not achieve [it] on earth…common endeavors for peace will unite individuals and nations in trust and friendship and help to make our human community safer and kinder.”  Click to read the entire article

The Listening Project - National and International

Written by The Listening Project on . Posted in Making a Difference

A Listening Project (LP) is a comprehensive process that includes deep listening interviews and community organizing that can result in cooperative community education and action on a wide range of issues and concerns. LPs are especially useful in communities where conflict, divisions or disempowerment weakens efforts for positive change. They can help organizations successfully address injustice, conflict, community development, health, environmental and others concerns.

What It Does

  • Identifies problems and issues that people care about.

  • Includes often unheard or unheeded voices.

  • Fosters emergence and development of new community leaders.

  • Generates creative solutions for community needs and problems.

  • Disseminates issue-related information and determines needs for additional information.

  • Encourages personal growth as all involved consider new viewpoints and information.

  • Forms uncommon coalitions and alliances through which diverse viewpoints can resolve - rather than clash over - difficult issues.

  • Promotes insight, empathy, and understanding among people with conflicting views.

  • Creates long-term capacity for grassroots community building.  Click here to read more

The Nobel Prize and The African Woman -Score Two for Peace

Written by Kwei Quartey, M.D on . Posted in Making a Difference

Three women are sharing the 2011 Nobel Prize for Peace. One is Yemeni human rights leader Tawakul Karman. The other two are African: Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf, Liberia’s current president and Africa’s only female democratically elected head of state, and her countrywoman Leymah Gbowee who is a peace activist and spellbinding challenger of the ultra-male, brutality-wielding world of warlords.

Honoring Asheville’s Living Treasures 2011

Written by Asheville Living Treasure Committee on . Posted in Making a Difference

The Asheville Living Treasures committee has chosen its first laureates, who will be honored this month (May, 2011) for their lifetimes of service to the community. The four remarkable Ashevilleans are: Jessie Coleman, the late Hyman Dave, Mary Parker, and Lucille Flack Ray. Click here for Urban News article.   Urban News - Gateway to the Multicultural Community

EXCLUSIVE: Kate Swift, Feminist Wordsmith, 1923 to 2011

Written by Rosalie Maggio - Women's Media Center on . Posted in Making a Difference

Nonsexist-language pioneer Kate Swift, 87, died early Saturday morning after a brief encounter with abdominal cancer. Her generous legacy to the world includes her revolutionary influence on our language as well as her productive activism (she helped effect Connecticut’s marriage equality act, protect prochoice legislation, promote progressive candidates, protest the war on Iraq, and conserve the environment).

The Shirataki Experiment

Written by The Celtic Dame on . Posted in LIFESTYLES@HOME

Seeing wet noodles in bags in the “toad-food” department of Ingle’s, I was suspicious. But today I found the same thing all over the tofu department of GreenLife, so I decided to try them.

 

In Cairo: A Birth

Written by Mona Helmy from WMC on . Posted in Making a Difference

Egyptian feminist writer Mona Helmy celebrates a fragile beginning of life in her poem, transliterated by Robin Morgan.

 

Healing and Feeling: Stress, Support and Breast Cancer

Written by Stanford University on . Posted in LIFESTYLES@HOME

They Teach It at Stanford

"I just finished taking an evening class at Stanford. The last lecture was on the mind-body connection - the relationship between stress and disease. The speaker from the department of psychiatry said, among other things, that one of the best things that a man could do for his health is to be married to a woman, whereas for a woman, one of the best things she could do for her health was to nurture her relationships with her girlfriends. At first everyone laughed, but he was serious.

Cleaning for a Reason

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 If you know a woman currently undergoing chemotherapy, please pass the word to her that there is a cleaning service that provided FREE housecleaning - once per month for four months while she is in treatment.   

What Is It About 20-Somethings?

Written by News or Press Release on . Posted in WOMEN LIVES

Robin Marantz Henig in The New York Times reports on the trend you yourself may have noticed lately: that a large percentage of twenty-somethings don't seem to be settling down at the same rate that this age group has done in the past. What you may not know is that some sociologiists and psychologists are calling upon social scientists to create a new age classification for the twenties (dare we say, tweenagers?) called emerging adults. The essay from the Times Magazine reports extentively on this trend, which is clearly supported by statistics showing higher age at marriage, higher rates of twenty-somethings living with their parents, more different jobs during the twenties, etc.

The Secret History of the War on Cancer

Written by News or Press Release on . Posted in HEALTH, FITNESS, NUTRITION

Davis, Devra Lee. The Secret History of the War on Cancer. New York: BasicBooks, 2007.

This work presents extremely disturbing  information about how virtually all information about the relationship between many synthetic chemicals and cancer have been blocked by both industry and government - leading to the conclusion that we are further behind in our understanding of this situation than researchers were in 1936. Dr. Davis also demonstrates the hypocrisy in which the same kind of experiments which are allowed to "prove" safety are considered inadequate to prove toxicity. Frankly, this makes the junk science of the Bush Administration look like a walk in the park.

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"Yes, we can!"

Written by Rev. Amanda Hendler-Voss on . Posted in SPIRITUALITY

    "Give the king your justice, O God, and your righteousness to a king’s son. May he be like rain that falls on the mown grass, like showers that water the earth. In his days may righteousness flourish and peace abound." Psalm 72:1,6-7

Did You Know?

Written by Center for Women's Business Research on . Posted in BUSINESS, ECONOMY, WORK & MONEY

According to the Center for Women's Business Research 10.6 million privately held companies are now at least 50%-owned by women. And from 1997 to 2004, the estimated growth rate in the number of female-owned companies reached 17%, nearly twice that of all businesses, at 9%.

Appraisal Q&A

Written by Bonnie Rose on . Posted in LIFESTYLES@HOME

Q: We moved but some of our things did not arrive on the moving van. Can we still have them appraised?

A: Yes, you can. Hypothetical appraisals are used to estimate the value of property which is no longer available for inspection, such as property that has been stolen, destroyed by fire, or damaged or misplaced by the moving company. The value conclusions are based on critical assumptions, any one of which could render the appraisal useless, if inaccurate. All hypothetical appraisals must clearly be labeled as such and the reason for the appraisal being hypothetical must be included. In addition, all critical assumptions must be thoroughly identified.

These critical assumptions will be based on verbal descriptions you give to the appraiser, and through the use of photographs, invoices, receipts, cancelled checks, catalogs, sketches, etc. If you don’t have photographs, perhaps your friends, old neighbors, or relatives might have some that were taken in your home. If you cannot adequately describe what was lost, the appraiser will not be able to determine replacement values.

Consider having your valuable items appraised before you move again. If these objects become lost, stolen, or destroyed, a moving company or insurance company claims adjuster can rely on the appraisal to settle your claim. Things that have sentimental value that cannot be replaced, such as photo albums and family heirlooms, should be moved by you and not packed or loaded onto the moving van.

What's Not There

Written by Annelinde Metzner on . Posted in ENVIRONMENT

Evenings, a salt breeze cools the skin.
Pelicans plunge deep, intensely focused.

Educate a Girl. Change the World.

Written by News or Press Release on . Posted in EDUCATION & GENDER STUDIES

Why Just Girls? In 2001 the World Bank identified education of girls as the key to effective development, saying countries that promote women's rights and increase their access to schooling have lower poverty rates, faster economic growth, healthier populations and less government corruption than countries that don't. www.givegirlsachance.org

Planting Under the Moon

Written by G. Leigh Wilkerson on . Posted in FOOD, FARM, MARKETS

When I first started gardening in Yancey County the weekly trips to Troy's Greenhouse were more about talking with Wade as he worked behind the counter than buying marigolds or potting soil. My Grandmother's green thumb--wisdom on what to do in burning sun and Alabama clay--didn't translate to the cool fog and sandy soils of South Toe.

Rain and Sparrows

Written by G. Leigh Wilkerson on . Posted in FOOD, FARM, MARKETS

The tomato vines were lush and chest high, the best I'd ever grown in my three years of vegetable gardening. The leaves were dark green and unblemished, the picture of plant vitality. My secret, I had decided, was a generous shovel of year-old compost every two weeks.

Appalachian Herbalist: A Profile

Written by Ellenburg on . Posted in FOOD, FARM, MARKETS

Two years ago I went to my grandmother's home to interview her. It was canning and freezing season, after the harvest, a beautiful late summer day. Her husband, Cecil was alive, but ill. “I hate to be a burden to you,” he told her, as he grew weaker and weaker with emphysema. “Don’t you say nothing,” she told him. “I’d rather wheel you around in that wheel barraw than be here without you.” Today Cecil is gone, and the vegetable and flower gardens in this article are smaller. She has seen so much pass away... the love of her life, the mountains, the clear rivers, the neighborliness of commu-nity, even that pure mountain dialect that turns a phrase in uncommon ways.

Ruby Wyatt said she was in the middle of canning, she just didn’t think she had time to be interviewed. Then she said she didn’t curl her hair until Tuesday nights, so she didn’t know about a photographer coming to her house. “Lord,” she finally admitted, “I won’t know what to say. I just don’t think I can do it.” But she did, and hidden beneath the shyness and the modesty is a mountain woman’s knowledge of the earth and its medicines.

Appalachian Herbalist: A Profile

Written by Ellenburg on . Posted in FOOD, FARM, MARKETS

Two years ago I went to my grandmother's home to interview her. It was canning and freezing season, after the harvest, a beautiful late summer day. Her husband, Cecil was alive, but ill. “I hate to be a burden to you,” he told her, as he grew weaker and weaker with emphysema. “Don’t you say nothing,” she told him. “I’d rather wheel you around in that wheel barraw than be here without you.” Today Cecil is gone, and the vegetable and flower gardens in this article are smaller. She has seen so much pass away... the love of her life, the mountains, the clear rivers, the neighborliness of commu-nity, even that pure mountain dialect that turns a phrase in uncommon ways.

Ruby Wyatt said she was in the middle of canning, she just didn’t think she had time to be interviewed. Then she said she didn’t curl her hair until Tuesday nights, so she didn’t know about a photographer coming to her house. “Lord,” she finally admitted, “I won’t know what to say. I just don’t think I can do it.” But she did, and hidden beneath the shyness and the modesty is a mountain woman’s knowledge of the earth and its medicines.

Planting Under the Moon

Written by G. Leigh Wilkerson on . Posted in FOOD, FARM, MARKETS

When I first started gardening in Yancey County the weekly trips to Troy's Greenhouse were more about talking with Wade as he worked behind the counter than buying marigolds or potting soil. My Grandmother's green thumb--wisdom on what to do in burning sun and Alabama clay--didn't translate to the cool fog and sandy soils of South Toe.

Rain and Sparrows

Written by G. Leigh Wilkerson on . Posted in FOOD, FARM, MARKETS

The tomato vines were lush and chest high, the best I'd ever grown in my three years of vegetable gardening. The leaves were dark green and unblemished, the picture of plant vitality. My secret, I had decided, was a generous shovel of year-old compost every two weeks. The vines were covered with swelling green tomatoes. I went around telling friends I had the prettiest tomato plants ever, despite the rainiest summer the North Carolina mountains had seen in years and a late start for lack of dry ground. From my window I could look out and see the huge green globes of fruit shining on the row.

Bring on the Russians: Adventures with Honeybees

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Apples need them. North Carolina blueberries need them too. Cucumbers, squash, melons, strawberries, and watermelons all share the same small yellow-and-black requirement. Honeybees that is, lots of them.

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