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Recipe: Marian’s Chocolate Pie

My mother and my sister, who was like a mother to me in the early years of my life, were both wonderful cooks and were especially talented at making delicious, tempting sweets that would curl any sweet tooth. I am sharing this particular recipe in honor of my sister who recently left this world of existence. I will share other recipes in the future that belong to my mother, my sister, and/or me.

This is the best chocolate pie I have ever eaten. In fact, once you eat a piece of this pie, the taste of all other chocolate pies will pale in comparison, to the point that you may opt out of eating a piece of any other chocolate pie. All of this is to say, be careful if you choose to prepare and eat a piece of this pie because it may well spoil all others for you. Caution — my mother and my sister both measured amounts by eye and hand, seldom by measuring spoon or cup. When it says an amount below it means heaping, e.g. 1 Tab. is 1 heaping tablespoon.

Mix together in a 4 quart pan:

1 cup sugar
4 Tabs. cocoa and add 2 cups pet milk*
2 Tabs. flour 1 tsp. salt

Mix the above together thoroughly, then begin heating the mixture, stirring to keep the mixture from sticking to the bottom of the pan. Better yet, use a double boiler for cooking.

Once the pan mixture has warmed, put 3 egg yolks (save the egg whites for the meringue) in a dish and lightly whip them; then gradually add several spoonfuls of the above warmed mixture and mix well with the yolks. Then add the dish mixture to the pan mixture very gradually, stirring constantly in order to keep the mixture from clumping (you have to be very vigilant with this and even then you may get some clumps). Cook until it bubbles, then quickly add 1 large Tab. butter and 1 tsp. vanilla; stir in, and then pour into a baked, slightly browned pie shell.

Take the 3 saved egg whites and beat until they peak when you spoon at it; add 1 cup sugar (or Splenda) and, if desired ¼ tsp. cream of tartar. Ice the top of the pie with this meringue mixture and brown lightly in a 425 degree F. oven.

Save the cooking pan for someone to “lick.” As kids we would lick the pan so clean that it almost didn’t need to be washed!

*You can substitute fat free or 2% milk, but it is not nearly as good.

As for the pie shell, the best pie shell is a homemade pie shell, but the ones from the grocery store will do. Home made pie shells are best because you can make them very short, flaky and tender (yum, yum). Here is a recipe for such a pie shell:

Mix together:
2 cups un-sifted flour or 2 ½ cups sifted flour
1 tsp. salt
Add:
¼ cup cold water
2/3 cup Crisco or those healthier substitutes that are now available

You can cut in the Crisco using 2 knives or mix with a pastry blender.

You may want to chill the dough for 10 to 15 minutes; it is so short that it is a little hard to work with, so chilling helps sometimes.

Roll out on a floured surface and fit into the pie pan. Preheat oven to 425 degrees F. Start crust out at 425 then within 3 minutes, reduce the heat to 350 degrees F. and bake until lightly browned; this allows the crust to set and then be browned.

SheVille Team

We are a one-of-a-kind magazine that provides local, regional, national and international information about women’s lives and education, performing and visual arts and writing, the environment, green living and sustainability and regional Western North Carolina business, people and events. “Villages preserve culture: dress, food and dance are a few examples. As villages grow in population and turn into towns, local cafes make way for large American chains. Handmade leather sandals are discarded for a pair of Western sneakers. Due to its small size, a village fosters a tight-knit sense of community. Justpeace.org explains the meaning of the African proverb, “It takes a village,” by stating that a sense of community is critical to maintaining a healthy society. Village members hold a wealth of information regarding their heritage: they know about the ancient traditions, methods of production and the resources of the land. When villages become dispersed or exterminated in times of war, this anthropological knowledge disappears. Large cities are not as conducive to growing and producing foods such as fruits and vegetables. Villages, on the other hand, usually have ample amounts of land and other resources necessary for growing conditions.” The Importance of Villages by Catherine Capozzi Our Mission SheVille.org provides readers with information important to women’s lives and well-being. We focus primarily on the areas of education & health, business & finance, the arts & the environment. We are particularly interested in local & regional resources, organizations & events.
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