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WOMEN: What We Have to Say…

WOMEN: What We Have to Say…

Four Adrian Dominican Attorneys Reflect on Legacy of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

October 3, 2020, Adrian, Michigan – As the United States is engaged in controversy over President Trump’s nomination of Judge Amy Coney Barrett to serve on the U.S. Supreme Court, four Adrian Dominican Sisters who are attorneys continued to reflect on the impact of U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

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EDUCATION AND HEALTH Some things to consider

EDUCATION AND HEALTH Some things to consider

Nikkina McKnight in The Lily

In-person classes, Internet snafus, melancholy hallways: This is what teaching in a pandemic is like: Read one teacher’s 30-day diary, plus responses from readers around the world

The coronavirus pandemic has reshaped everyone’s lives. For teachers, that has meant a new school year full of unknowns and readjustments: As some schools remain 100 percent remote, others are conducting classes in-person or doing a hybrid of both. That’s the case for Nikkina McKnight, who is a teacher of technology career education at Andrew Jackson High School, a public school in Kershaw, S.C.

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SUSTAINABILITY: Climate Justice, Citizen Climate Lobby and One Very Hard Read

SUSTAINABILITY: Climate Justice, Citizen Climate Lobby and One Very Hard Read

City of Asheville committee to hold  climate justice public input session

The Sustainability Advisory Committee on Energy and the Environment (SACEE) will hold a virtual public meeting at 6 p.m. Oct. 28. The City of Asheville declared a climate emergency when City Council approved and adopted Resolution 20-25 on Jan. 29, as endorsed by SACEE. In declaring this emergency, the City has recognized not only the importance of taking action to reduce the impacts of climate change but also the importance of incorporating social justice into those actions. 

As stated by the NAACP: “Environmental injustice, including the proliferation of climate change, has a disproportionate impact on communities of color and low-income communities in the United States and around the world.” CLICK FOR MORE>

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A DAY TO REFLECT ON STOLEN LANDS

A DAY TO REFLECT ON STOLEN LANDS

This Indigenous Peoples’ Day Couldn’t Be More Important in Native Organizers Alliance

Today is Indigenous Peoples’ Day – October 12
 
It is a day to reflect on the history of Native peoples in the U.S. and the world. It is also a day to remind everyone that in the 21st Century Native peoples remain a vibrant part of political and cultural life.

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GUIDE: How to repair a family rift

GUIDE: How to repair a family rift

by Pam Weintraub In PSYCHE

Healing an estrangement can be deeply rewarding. Acknowledge your role in what happened, then look ahead to brighter days.

Family estrangements are fundamental to the human story, starting the day that God tossed Adam and Eve from the garden. Likewise, in Greek mythology, there’s Electra, who murdered her mother to avenge her father, and Tantalus, who cooked his son and fed him to Olympian gods. The trope continues: just look at the brutal enemies Tywin and Tyrion Lannister, father and son power players in the TV series Game of ThronesCLICK TO CONTINUE

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CREATED 150 YEARS AGO, the Justice Department’s First Mission Was to Protect Black Rights

CREATED 150 YEARS AGO, the Justice Department’s First Mission Was to Protect Black Rights

By Bryan Greene in SMITHSONIANMAGAZINE.COM

Amos T. Akerman was an unlikely figure to head the newly formed Department of Justice. In 1870, the United States was still working to bind up the nation’s wounds torn open by the Civil War. During this period of Reconstruction, the federal government committed itself to guaranteeing full citizenship rights to all Americans, regardless of race. At the forefront of that effort was Akerman, a former Democrat and enslaver from Georgia, and a former officer in the Confederate Army.

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7 East Coast Escapes for a Socially-Distant Fall Road Trip

7 East Coast Escapes for a Socially-Distant Fall Road Trip

in HERE

These seven getaways on the East Coast will help you take the break you need this fall—while still adhering to social distancing guidelines.

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HISTORY STORIES: Vote-by-Mail Programs Date Back to the Civil War

HISTORY STORIES: Vote-by-Mail Programs Date Back to the Civil War

by JESSICA PEARCE ROTONDI in HISTORY

Voting by mail can trace its roots to soldiers voting far from home during the Civil War and World War II. By the late 1800s, some states were extending absentee ballots to civilian voters under certain conditions, but it wasn’t until 2000 that Oregon became the first state to move to an all-mail voting system. Here is everything you need to know about the history of absentee voting and vote by mail.

CLICK TO CONTINUE

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Letter: Mission nurses’ victory will ripple across the South

Letter: Mission nurses’ victory will ripple across the South

by Jim Stokely in Mountain Xpress, Asheville, N C

As a former labor negotiator for Sylvania, I would like to share my thoughts regarding the recent union vote by Mission nurses. Ever since the National Labor Relations Act of 1935, which defined the playing field for collective bargaining, the conventional wisdom for corporate management has been to do whatever can be done to stretch out the time between (a) the date many of the workers petition for a union and (b) the date all workers vote for or against a union. The thinking is that the initial burst of energy from workers will dissipate and that management has more time to hire anti-union consultants, plan anti-union communications and control the message throughout the union campaign. CLICK TO CONTINUE

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IN MEMORY of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg (1933-2020) from the American Civil Liberties Union and Planned Parenthood

IN MEMORY of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg (1933-2020) from the American Civil Liberties Union and Planned Parenthood

Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the Supreme Court justice who first rose to national prominence as an ACLU lawyer fighting for equal rights for women, has died at 87 years old.
 
She began Harvard Law School as a young mother and one of only nine women in her class, and became the architect of a legal strategy to eradicate gender discrimination in the United States. She modeled her approach after that of Thurgood Marshall on race discrimination, planning for a series of cases at the Supreme Court, each precedent paving the way for the next that would further expand rights and protections. In 1993, she joined the court as an associate justice, and over the decades became a cultural icon beloved for her vision and passion in defending the rights of women.

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How do we think about the land we live on?

How do we think about the land we live on?

This week we hosted a webinar, “Learning and Teaching about Indigenous Cultures, Languages, and Territories,” with Christine McRae from Native Land Digital. We were excited to learn that close to 900 people registered!

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