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CITY OF ASHEVILLE PUBLIC ART PROGRAM

( Photo from the 2018 RADfest)

History of the Public Art Program

Starting in the 1970s, people began to notice that Asheville had very little public art compared to other cities around the country. As an outgrowth of the Streetscapes program, the Urban Trail Committee was formed in 1992 to develop a walking art trail highlighting historically important architecture, people and events within downtown Asheville. The Urban Trail became an Asheville treasure and helped show citizens what public art could do for our community. In November of 1998, a group of eighteen concerned citizens came together to form the Public Art Working Group. Many meetings and a great deal of research later, City Council adopted the City’s first Public Art Policy. A newly established Public Art Board started meeting in May of 2000.


Asheville Public Art Components

As you explore Asheville, you’ll see a number of sculptures and other pieces of art: The “Energy Loop”, the Deco Gecko in Pritchard Park, the murals in the City Hall chambers, the bronze life-size sculpture of Martin Luther King, Jr. at MLK Park, and the more than 30 sculptures and plaques along the Urban Trail are all part of Asheville’s public art collection.

 

Information About the Urban Trail
Map of Urban Trail and Public Art Collection


Public Art Master Plan

The Public Art Master Plan (PAMP) was completed in 2000 and re-adopted in November, 2008. Our community has changed significantly since this plan was created The Public Art and Cultural Commission and the Strategic Development Office of the City will review this document in late fall 2018 in order to recommend to Council any needed changes.

Public Art Master Plan


Public Art Cultural Commission

The Public Art board meets the fourth Thursday of January, March, May, July, September and November at 4:00 p.m., in the 1st floor conference room of City Hall. The meetings last 1 -2 hours.

The Community and Economic Development Department coordinates with the Parks and Recreation Department to administer the City of Asheville’s investments in public art and place-making. The Strategic Development Office and the Outdoor Events and Film Manager support arts and culture initiatives as a strategy for wealth creation and the enhancement of place.  We work with designers, producers, developers, businesses and artists to connect to the public’s interest across the built and natural environment. One way we accomplish this is through the promotion of the goals of the Public Art Master Plan and administration of the City’s Public Art Policy.


Contact Information

Stephanie Monson Dahl
(828) 232-4502

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SheVille Team

We are a one-of-a-kind magazine that provides local, regional, national and international information about women’s lives and education, performing and visual arts and writing, the environment, green living and sustainability and regional Western North Carolina business, people and events. “Villages preserve culture: dress, food and dance are a few examples. As villages grow in population and turn into towns, local cafes make way for large American chains. Handmade leather sandals are discarded for a pair of Western sneakers. Due to its small size, a village fosters a tight-knit sense of community. Justpeace.org explains the meaning of the African proverb, “It takes a village,” by stating that a sense of community is critical to maintaining a healthy society. Village members hold a wealth of information regarding their heritage: they know about the ancient traditions, methods of production and the resources of the land. When villages become dispersed or exterminated in times of war, this anthropological knowledge disappears. Large cities are not as conducive to growing and producing foods such as fruits and vegetables. Villages, on the other hand, usually have ample amounts of land and other resources necessary for growing conditions.” The Importance of Villages by Catherine Capozzi Our Mission SheVille.org provides readers with information important to women’s lives and well-being. We focus primarily on the areas of education & health, business & finance, the arts & the environment. We are particularly interested in local & regional resources, organizations & events.
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