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SheVille Team

We are a one-of-a-kind magazine that provides local, regional, national and international information about women’s lives and education, performing and visual arts and writing, the environment, green living and sustainability and regional Western North Carolina business, people and events. “Villages preserve culture: dress, food and dance are a few examples. As villages grow in population and turn into towns, local cafes make way for large American chains. Handmade leather sandals are discarded for a pair of Western sneakers. Due to its small size, a village fosters a tight-knit sense of community. Justpeace.org explains the meaning of the African proverb, “It takes a village,” by stating that a sense of community is critical to maintaining a healthy society. Village members hold a wealth of information regarding their heritage: they know about the ancient traditions, methods of production and the resources of the land. When villages become dispersed or exterminated in times of war, this anthropological knowledge disappears. Large cities are not as conducive to growing and producing foods such as fruits and vegetables. Villages, on the other hand, usually have ample amounts of land and other resources necessary for growing conditions.” The Importance of Villages by Catherine Capozzi Our Mission SheVille.org provides readers with information important to women’s lives and well-being. We focus primarily on the areas of education & health, business & finance, the arts & the environment. We are particularly interested in local & regional resources, organizations & events.

Resources for White Parents Raising Anti-Racist Kids

Kriya Lendzion – Evergreen Community Charter School,  Last edit: 7/15/20

Research shows that kids as young as toddlers are actively learning about race and ethnicity, forming stereotypes and biases based on the toxic images and messages that we are all soaking in. When parents ignore the topic of race, children learn that racial diversity and inequities are too scary to talk about, don’t truly exist, or aren’t important enough to address. Therefore, it is critical that parents learn to intentionally talk about race and racism and not leave children on their own to learn about it from the media or others. As parents, we have the greatest power to disassemble harmful messages, and shape kids that not only live in awareness, acceptance and kindness, but as active change agents in dismantling racism for our next generation. Here are some resources to help! CLICK TO CONTINUE


THE ENDURING GRACE OF JOHN LEWIS An interview in On Being by Krista Tippett

The legendary late civil rights elder and congressman, with lived wisdom for the culture of protest and common life today.

An extraordinary conversation with the late congressman John Lewis, taped in Montgomery, Alabama, during a pilgrimage 50 years after the March on Washington. It offers a special look inside his wisdom, the civil rights leaders’ spiritual confrontation within themselves, and the intricate art of nonviolence as “love in action.”   CLICK HERE  TO LISTEN


A New Album Re-Creates The Work Of The 1st Known Female Composers In America

By AVERY KEATLEY in NPR

Chris Herbert was in a hurry. The vocalist and musicologist was studying the Ephrata Codex — an 18th century music manuscript — in the Library of Congress, which meant he was on the clock. Herbert was working on digitizing the Codex. He flipped through the pages, taking pictures of each one, with no time to pause.

A few weeks later while on tour in Europe, he took time to examine his work and noticed something he hadn’t seen before. Zooming in on the images he’d hastily snapped in the Library of Congress, he saw names written in small font beside the musical compositions. Three of those names belonged to women: Sister Föben, Sister Katura and Sister Hanna. CLICK TO CONTINUE

Thanks to Linda Kooiker for offering this article.


ASHEVILLE LATEST TRAVEL UPDATES from Explore Asheville

As we continue in Phase II of North Carolina’s re-opening plan, shops, galleries, attractions, taprooms, and restaurants are predominantly open and welcome guests. In opening, many Asheville-area businesses, residents and guests are making a commitment to each other: Our Stay Safe Pledge.  Asheville cares about every neighbor and guest, and as you are welcomed into open shops, restaurants, attractions, and natural spaces, it is with sincere consideration for each other’s well-being. Learn about the Stay Safe Pledge here »


MAB SEGREST on building a Southern freedom movement for all

By Grace Abels July 16, 2020

In 1988, Southern Exposure, the print forerunner to Facing South, published an issue titled “Mint Juleps, Wisteria, and Queers” that focused on lesbian and gay experiences in the South. It featured stories on the budding gay press, lesbian love in the face of military suppression, rural Radical Faerie communities, queer bar culture, and the emerging popularity of drag.  CLICK TO CONTINUE


Something Old, Something New, Something Streaming, Something Live!

Shindig on the Green is a mainstay of summer in downtown Asheville. People gather to listen, jam, and perform traditional music on and around the Bascom Lamar Lunsford Stage. This year the gathering of people that makes Shinding so special is not an option, but Shinding and the Mountain Dance and Folk Festival are streaming your way! Each Saturday the Shindig YouTube Channel and Facebook will stream a curated list of the most viewed videos from Shindigs past. The Mountain Dance and Folk Festival, the oldest continuous folk festival in the country, will take place digitally August 6-8 and feature some of the top mountain music performers from western North Carolina.


Instead Of Telling Kids To ‘Be Careful’, Try These Phrases Instead

When I was 11, I spent most of the summer at a rope swing with my friends. It was along the Provo River, middle of nowhere Utah. No parents around, just kids. More or less, it was a husky brown rope strapped to a dying tree, and we spent hours there, working on back flips, and front flips, and belly flops. 

Sometimes we climbed up into the tree and jumped into the river from dangerous heights. Sometimes we flat out fell from the tree. Sometimes we got into fights. No one ever, not once, told us to be careful. We got into trouble, and we figured out how to get out of it. This was back in the mid 90s, back when parents could let their children go off and do something like that. CLICK TO CONTINUE


How one woman pulled off the first consumer boycott – and helped inspire the British to abolish slavery

in THE CONVERSATION July 10, 2020

While many companies have trumpeted their support for the Black Lives Matter movement, others are beginning to face consumer pressure for not appearing to do enough.

For example, some people are advocating a consumer boycott of Starbucks over an internal memo that prohibits employees from wearing gear that refers to the movement. And advocates are urging supporters to target other companies under the Twitter tag #boycott4blacklives.                      CLICK TO CONTINUE

 


TONI FRISSELL PHOTOGRAPHY: Magnificent Pictures Captured By One Of The Influential Female Photographer Of The 20th Century

By Jacob Aberto in BYGONELY

On the lists of great photographers of the 20th century, the names are usually male, Guy BourdinAddison ScurlockPhilippe Halsman, and  Norman Parkinson. There are exceptions such as Arbus, Vivian MaierNina Leen? Some of these artists are not admired for their work or they are considered as portrait photographer or fashion photographer.


Asheville Restaurants Offering OUTDOOR DINING

in Explore Asheville

Asheville has long been called “Paris of the South” — thanks in part to its abundance of restaurants and cafes with outdoor and sidewalk seating.

As restaurants and the city of Asheville work to take important social distancing precautions in response to COVID-19, they now are expanding outdoor areas for waiting and dining. These expanded areas are known as “parklets.”

The list below includes restaurants known to have outside seating. Restaurants are working to meet new health and safety guidelines so hours of operation and services may change. It is recommended that you contact restaurants in advance to learn whether they are open and what outdoor seating options are currently available. The state of North Carolina requires masks inside restaurants (when you’re not eating). Masks are required outside if social distancing is not possible.  CLICK TO CONTINUE


An Exhibition Made for and by the Afro-Latinx Angeleno Community

By Elisa Wouk Almino in Hyperallergic

Since 2018, LA Plaza de Cultura y Artes, a Mexican-American museum and cultural center in downtown Los Angeles, has been planning an exhibition on the culture and history of Afro-Latinx Angelenos. From the project’s inception, the lead curator, Mariah Berlanga-Shevchuk, wanted the show to be realized by the local community. Over the course of several months, the museum put out open calls for local Afro-Latinx families and individuals to share their stories and artifacts, and received a wonderful range of submissions, from family photos and recipes to handmade jewelry, instruments, and orixa dolls. The result, afroLAtinidad: mi casa, my city, opened in late February of this year. CICK TO CONTINUE


REPRISE: A PREDATORY MODEL that can’t be fixed – Why banks should be kept from reentering the payday loan business

By the Progressive Blog Policy Watch

[Editor’s note: In the new Washington, D.C. of Donald Trump, many once-settled policies in the realm of consumer protection are now “back on the table” as predatory businesses push to take advantage of the president’s pro-corporate/anti-regulatory stances. A new report from the Center for Responsible Lending (“Been there; done that: Banks should stay out of payday lending”) explains why one of the most troubling of these efforts – a proposal to allow banks to re-enter the inherently destructive business of making high-interest “payday” loans should be fought and rejected at all costs.]


IT’S A WRAP! Youth Media Academy Summer 2020!

It’s a wrap! In an inspirational and tear-worthy closing ceremony held last week, we celebrated sixty-six remarkable student filmmakers from coast to coast and the conclusion of our Summer 2020 virtual Youth Media Academy (YMA)—our free, four-week program training underrepresented youth in filmmaking and gender activism. In spite of the unprecedented circumstances we are all facing during a global pandemic, in our opinion, the young participants rocked it! 


The Status of Women in North Carolina: Health and Wellness

Publication Date: June 2019 Click here to view full report 

The health and wellness of women in North Carolina has improved in some ways, yet not all women are equally benefiting from this progress. Wide disparities persist in disease and mortality rates and incidence of sexually transmitted infections by race and ethnicity, as well as by county. Ensuring that women can access the health care services they need – including for mental health and substance abuse – is vital to the health and well-being of women in North Carolina.

Additionally, women’s experiences of intimate partner violence show the detrimental impact this violence has on women in the state. The Status of Women in North Carolina: Health & Wellness is the second in a series of four publications that provide data and policy recommendations to improve North Carolina women’s status in several key areas.  CLICK TO CONTINUE


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