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SheVille Team

We are a one-of-a-kind magazine that provides local, regional, national and international information about women’s lives and education, performing and visual arts and writing, the environment, green living and sustainability and regional Western North Carolina business, people and events. “Villages preserve culture: dress, food and dance are a few examples. As villages grow in population and turn into towns, local cafes make way for large American chains. Handmade leather sandals are discarded for a pair of Western sneakers. Due to its small size, a village fosters a tight-knit sense of community. Justpeace.org explains the meaning of the African proverb, “It takes a village,” by stating that a sense of community is critical to maintaining a healthy society. Village members hold a wealth of information regarding their heritage: they know about the ancient traditions, methods of production and the resources of the land. When villages become dispersed or exterminated in times of war, this anthropological knowledge disappears. Large cities are not as conducive to growing and producing foods such as fruits and vegetables. Villages, on the other hand, usually have ample amounts of land and other resources necessary for growing conditions.” The Importance of Villages by Catherine Capozzi Our Mission SheVille.org provides readers with information important to women’s lives and well-being. We focus primarily on the areas of education & health, business & finance, the arts & the environment. We are particularly interested in local & regional resources, organizations & events.

ADRIENNE RICH on the Political Power of Poetry and Its Role in the Immigrant Experience

One summer evening not long ago, on a rainy Brooklyn rooftop, a friend — a brilliant friend who studies the cosmos and writes uncommonly poetic novels — stunned me with an improbable, deceptively simple yet enormous question: “What does poetry do?”

I fumbled for Baldwin: “The poets [are] the only people who know the truth about us. Soldiers don’t. Statesmen don’t. Priests don’t. Union leaders don’t. Only poets.” And then I mumbled something about how poetry gives shape to our experiences through language, thus conferring validity and dignity upon them, enlarging our access to our own humanity. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE


Men Are Not Big Babies

by Shannon Ashley in Medium/Equality

“They are trapped and they don’t even have the language to talk about how they feel about being trapped, because the language that exists to express the full range of human emotion is still viewed as sensitive and feminine.” – Michael Ian Black

For whatever wrong reason, I have in the past been guilty of perpetuating the myth of the “man cold” and commenting that “men are babies.” As I get older, it’s one type of sentiment that I have nixed from my vocabulary.

When we talk about toxic masculinity and mainstream culture, it seems to me that both men and women have been subject to different and varying degrees of infantilization.

CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE


The World’s Happiest People Have a Beautifully Simple Way to Tackle Loneliness

in Pocket Worthy

QuartzJenny Anderson

Sometimes a place for people to come together is what’s needed most.

Toad, a 20-year-old Danish woman living in Copenhagen, has been lonely her whole life. She is autistic, and as a child, did not have any friends. When she moved from the country to the city, not much changed. “They says it’s a phase, but a phase becomes a life,” she says, surrounded by six other young adults in a cozy apartment in Copenhagen—all of whom are working on becoming less lonely.


“BE BRAVE! – A SALUTE TO SHEROES”, Get Tickets Online for Womansong Concert – December 7th and 8th! at A-B Tech

Asheville’s longest-running women’s community chorus presents its winter concert, “Be Brave – a salute to Sheroes!” honors the many “Sheroes” in our world: well-known public figures such as Malala, Pauli Murray, Harriet Tubman, and Ruth Bader Ginsburg who have changed history, along with everyday women who rise above life’s challenges to lead with love.  GET TICKETS HERE  


The Feminist History of ‘Take Me Out to the Ball Game’

Described by Hall of Fame broadcaster Harry Caray as “a song that reflects the charisma of baseball,” ”Take Me Out to the Ball Game,” written in 1908 by lyricist Jack Norworth and composer Albert von Tilzer, is inextricably linked to America’s national pastime. But while most Americans can sing along as baseball fans “root, root, root for the home team,” few know the song’s feminist history.


THE NORTH CAROLINA ARBORETUM Exhibits and Events

For more than 30 years…Cultivating Connections between People, Plants and Places…amid a 434-acre public garden, The North Carolina Arboretum is located within the Bent Creek Experimental Forest just south of Asheville and adjacent to the Blue Ridge Parkway at Milepost 393. Surrounded and crisscrossed by forested coves and meandering creeks in the botanically diverse Southern Appalachian Mountains, The North Carolina Arboretum is set in one of the most beautiful natural settings in America.


Why I train grandmothers to treat depression | Dixon Chibanda

This post is offered by Cynthia Turner 

Here’s a wonderful TED Talk on YouTube. Dixon Chibanda is one of 12 psychiatrists in Zimbabwe — for a population of more than 16 million. Realizing that his country would never be able to scale traditional methods of treating those with mental health issues, Chibanda helped to develop a beautiful solution powered by a limitless resource: grandmothers. In this extraordinary, inspirational talk, learn more about the friendship bench program, which trains grandmothers in evidence-based talk therapy and brings care, and hope, to those in need.’ CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

 

 


THE MYTH OF SOULMATES: Advice from someone who’s been married for 10 years

by Jessica Valenti in GEN

Ten years ago today, I got married in an upstate New York ceremony that I planned down to the dinner napkin placement and band’s song order. I wore gray instead of white — I had just written a book decrying America’s obsession with virginity — and had spent the two previous nights meticulously punching out leaf-shaped pieces of paper with my then fiancé, pasting them on seating cards. It was a lovely and love-filled day.


Pregnancy and Postpartum Depression

Offered by Tracey Fowler at Maryville University, St. Louis, Missouri

About Postpartum Depression

Having a baby is typically described as a time of joy. A time to celebrate the new little life that has been brought into this world. A time to be thankful for the family unit that has now been increased by one or more.

However, for some women, this life-altering event brings about feelings that aren’t quite as joyful, and begins a condition known as postpartum depression (PPD).


SHE LOVED HORSES: Thea & The Green Man new CD release

She Loved Horses, by Thea, is a new CD release of heart-opening songs with emotional impact and spiritual roots by an award-winning, singer-songwriter. Thea spent her early childhood barefoot among the Seminole Indians on the banks of the Miami River, and all of her childhood summers in the Appalachian Mountains of North Carolina where she currently resides in Asheville. These influences, along with her abiding love of nature, weave images of river, ocean, mountain and canyon through her songwriting.


THE MATILDA EFFECT: the misappropriating of women’s scientific achievements

in Wikipedia

The Matilda effect is a bias against acknowledging the achievements of those women scientists whose work is attributed to their male colleagues. This effect was first described by suffragist and abolitionist Matilda Joslyn Gage (1826–98) in her essay, “Woman as Inventor” (first published as a tract in 1870 and in the North American Review in 1883). The term “Matilda effect” was coined in 1993 by science historian Margaret W. Rossiter.


SEASONAL EVENTS in Asheville and WNC

Asheville’s seasons are a palette of colors and experiences, ranging from the enchanting holidays and spring mountains bursting with blooms to the outdoor adventures of summertime and the breathtaking colors of fall. In Asheville, you’ll find plenty to do any time of year. Pick your season for the best of fall, winter, spring and summer!  Asheville for every season.


Asheville, NC Current Weather
36°
moderate rain
humidity: 100%
wind: 8mph N
H 33 • L 29
39°
Wed
42°
Thu
44°
Fri
Weather from OpenWeatherMap

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