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Author Archive

SheVille Team

We are a one-of-a-kind magazine that provides local, regional, national and international information about women’s lives and education, performing and visual arts and writing, the environment, green living and sustainability and regional Western North Carolina business, people and events. “Villages preserve culture: dress, food and dance are a few examples. As villages grow in population and turn into towns, local cafes make way for large American chains. Handmade leather sandals are discarded for a pair of Western sneakers. Due to its small size, a village fosters a tight-knit sense of community. Justpeace.org explains the meaning of the African proverb, “It takes a village,” by stating that a sense of community is critical to maintaining a healthy society. Village members hold a wealth of information regarding their heritage: they know about the ancient traditions, methods of production and the resources of the land. When villages become dispersed or exterminated in times of war, this anthropological knowledge disappears. Large cities are not as conducive to growing and producing foods such as fruits and vegetables. Villages, on the other hand, usually have ample amounts of land and other resources necessary for growing conditions.” The Importance of Villages by Catherine Capozzi Our Mission SheVille.org provides readers with information important to women’s lives and well-being. We focus primarily on the areas of education & health, business & finance, the arts & the environment. We are particularly interested in local & regional resources, organizations & events.

Diabetes – by Melissa Hicks M.D. of MAHEC Family Health Center

Diabetes has gotten lots more press lately, as it relates to health in general, and the increasing issue of other health related developments, such as obesity. For the purpose of this writing, Diabetes or Diabetes Mellitus will refer to the “Adult onset” or commonly known “Type II” Diabetes, usually diagnosed in adulthood (also more and more young adult/teens, too). 

  


Enrich Your Life by Living Gratefully!

Enrich Your Life by Living Gratefully!

By Rabbi Rami 

 What are you grateful for? Try not to cough up the usual suspects: sunsets, daisies, puppies, babies, and babies playing with puppies among the daisies at sunset. True, I’m grateful that the earth orbits the sun, and I love dogs and babies, but being grateful for these things is too easy. Being grateful requires more than warm fuzzy feelings; it requires clear seeing and right action.

 Not long ago a woman shared with me her experience as a lung transplant recipient. She was grateful to the organ donor, and the doctors and nurses who performed the operation. What about the drunk driver who killed the woman whose lung saved her life, I asked; was she grateful to him as well?

 She just stared at me. No one had asked her that before. To her credit, she closed her eyes, took a moment to see what was true for her, and said, yes she was grateful to the man who killed her donor and thus saved her life. Then her eyes filled with tears, and said, “And I hate myself for that.”

As we talked she realized that it wasn’t self-hate she was feeling but extreme humility. After all, she neither wished the death of her donor nor did anything to cause it; she simply benefited from this tragedy. But that realization was huge. What if the deceased woman had a family, she mused. What if she had little children who would grow up without a mom? What if she was caring for her parents? A single death can have so many ramifications. How do I live with this, she sobbed.

 Your situation may not be this extreme, but the question she asked is your question as well. You are being gifted by people and things all the time. How do you live with this? This is what gratitude is really all about: not feeling grateful, but living gratefully.

 Chances are you too have lungs, and don’t need a transplant to be grateful for them. But what about the Brazilian rainforest? Are you grateful for that? After all, your lungs are useless without oxygen, yet neither they nor any other organ in your body produces oxygen. Trees and plants in partnership with the sun do that, and the Brazilian rainforest processes 28% of the world’s oxygen, so the forest is a vital part of your body as well. If you are grateful to your lungs, you must be grateful to trees and plants as well. How do you express your gratitude? What do you do to help secure clean air for your lungs to breathe?

 Despite clichés to the contrary, it isn’t the thought that counts; it is the deed that counts. Gratitude that is merely attitude is cheap and meaningless. If you are grateful to your lungs, don’t poison them with carcinogens. If you are grateful for oxygen, protect the living system that produces it. Or, if you don’t, at least have the courage to stop claiming you are grateful for lungs and oxygen.

 * * *

 I wear Rockport shoes and return them to the company for resoling. The first time I did this the shoes came back in near mint condition accompanied by a hand-written note from the person who restored them. He explained how very disappointed he was that I disrespected the shoes he works so hard to make: the leather was scuffed and unpolished; the shoe backs were broken; and the toe box was misshapen because I didn’t keep my shoes on a shoetree. He concluded by asking me to treat his work with more respect.

 That was 30 years ago, and I have never treated my shoes the same since. What about you? You would be lost without your shoes. They support your arches, protect your feet from hot pavements and dangerous debris, and (along with your shirt) allow you to eat in restaurants. So how do you show your gratitude? Look at your shoes and see.

 What about the rest of your clothes? Do you keep them clean, neatly folded or hanging properly? When you no longer need them, do you toss them out or do you donate them where someone else can benefit from them?

 What is true of shoes and clothes is true of everything. It is easy to assess the quality of gratitude in your life by examining how well you treat the people and things in your life. You are being gifted by people and things—seen and unseen, known and unknown—all day, every day. That should make you feel grateful, but more importantly it should cause you to live gratefully.

 Living gratefully means taking nothing and no one for granted. It means treating salespeople, stock clerks, bank tellers, and cashiers kindly. It means not polluting your body with excess sugar, fat, and salt. It means not polluting your community with bigotry, fear, anger, gossip, and ill-will. It means saying thank you to everyone and everything by treating them all with utmost respect.

 Be grateful for babies and puppies, just don’t stop there. Join with others to offer a scholarship at a local daycare center, adopt or rescue an animal companion, or support a local animal shelter. Gratitude is not a way of feeling, it is a way of doing. If you aren’t living gratefully, feeling grateful means nothing at all.

 ###

Rabbi Rami Shapiro, PhD teaches religious studies at Middle Tennessee State University and is the director of Wisdom House Center for Interfaith Studies in Nashville. He has written over two dozen books and a new series, Rabbi Rami Guides: Roadside Assistance for the Spiritual Traveler, available at Spirituality & Health Books and Amazon.com; see www.rabbirami.com.   SMITH PUBLICITY, INC.  856-489-8654 x326


Diabetes and Chinese Medicine

Diabetes is one of the few diseases in western medicine that was discussed in ancient Chinese medical literature. Over the last 2000 years, many Chinese herbs and acupuncture points have been identified for its treatment, and it is fairly common for diabetic patients in China to use Chinese medicine alone with satisfactory results. In the West, diabetes is seldom the main reason for a visit to the Chinese medical practitioner, who from time to time may see people with secondary manifestations of the disease such as limb numbness and pain. In most cases, diabetes is only mentioned in passing in the patient’s health profile.


New Girl Scouts Research Exposes the Impact of Reality TV on Girls

As reality TV has become staple entertainment for young people and adults alike, tween and teen girls who regularly view reality TV accept and expect a higher level of drama, aggression, and bullying in their own lives, and measure their worth primarily by their physical appearance, according to Real to Me: Girls and Reality TV, a national survey released today by the Girl Scout Research Institute.


FAQ

What are your web statistics?

Because Western North Carolina is such a seasonal as well as a destination region, our monthly statistics vary.  SheVille’s readership is huge with folks finding us online and by word of mouth of course. Two-thirds of our readers come from the southeast U.S., then national and about one-tenth international.  We have at least 4500 unique visitors monthly, with hundreds of people online in SheVille at the same time at any given moment. During springtime each year we typically reach over half a million hits a month. SHEVILLE IS OPEN 24/7!

What can SheVille do for me?

Lots! If you join us as a business resource member, we can help you have a broad web marketing presence at a very affordable rate. There’s also opportunity to sponsor your favorite non-profit program at a reduced rate.

If you join us as a non-profit program, we can help you to become known by a wider audience, some of whom could be just the ones looking for volunteer opportunities or who intend to move to WNC are are interested in supporting our local programs.

If you join us as a personal member,  you are helping us get the word out about the many extraordinary women’s, arts and environmental groups and events in Western North Carolina.  Purchase announcement space or sponsor your favorite non-profit program.

Events’ announcements are free in the SheVille COMMUNITY CALENDAR!

Send in your questions and we’ll answer them here. info@sheville.org

 


VIDA – Women in the Literary Arts

VIDA was founded in August 2009 to address the need for female writers of literature to engage in conversations regarding the critical reception of women’s creative writing in our current culture.

VIDA seeks to explore critical and cultural perceptions of writing by women through meaningful conversation and the exchange of ideas among existing and emerging literary communities.   Click for more information


Addressing the Prevalence of Eating Disorders through Fiction

Before I Disappear, by Barb Herding, chronicles the story of Lauren Stafford, a 16 year old girl whose self-esteem has been crushed by rejection from everyone in her life.  Lauren develops a skewed perception of her body as a result of the rejection that she experiences, which turns into an eating disorder.

When her eating disorder spirals out of control and she is rushed to the hospital, Lauren meets other teens who are suffering from the same problems, and she sees that she is not alone and just how many different types of people are affected by the same affliction. As she is introduced to both males and females, she learns about teenagers from all walks of life who are internalizing different types of pressure.  In group therapy, she meets Bridget, a ballerina who collapsed during her solo in The Nutcracker, Paul who should be fighting in his first championship wrestling match, and Vivian, a model who never made it to her first real photo shoot.  Then there is Jenny, who does not want to tell her story to the group, as her eating disorder and near fatal episode result from a dark secret rooted in her childhood.

According to the Palo Alto Medical Foundation, approximately one percent of adolescent girls develop anorexia nervosa and another two to three percent develop bulimia nervosa.  Alarmingly, one out of every ten anorexia cases is fatal, resulting from starvation, cardiac arrest, suicide, or other related medical complications.

Herding’s story provides an important message about eating disorders, their potential consequences, and the road to recovery, addressing an issue that is prevalent in our society through fiction.  Before I Disappear is a heart-rending story that is certain to tug at the emotions of its readers, provide teens with an important message about eating disorders, and help parents to understand their teenagers who suffer from eating disorders.
Contact: Emily – emily@bookstandpublishing.com


BeeSting – Exploring the Imbalance of the Feminine in Our Culture

BeeSting is a response to the emotional, physical, and spiritual stress of breast cancer against a backdrop of the declining bee population and ever-increasing toxicity of Mother Earth. It explores the imbalance of the feminine in our culture, manifested inwardly with the disease of our breasts, and outwardly with the pollution of our planet. It moves between metaphor and realism, blending personal expression, medicine, humor, poetry, and gratitude. Visit our Website for more information


The Nobel Prize and The African Woman -Score Two for Peace

Three women are sharing the 2011 Nobel Prize for Peace. One is Yemeni human rights leader Tawakul Karman. The other two are African: Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf, Liberia’s current president and Africa’s only female democratically elected head of state, and her countrywoman Leymah Gbowee who is a peace activist and spellbinding challenger of the ultra-male, brutality-wielding world of warlords.


The Center for End of Life Transitions & Carolina Memorial Sanctuary

The Center for End of Life Transitions assists you in settling the matters of your world and making decisions ahead of time, you create an opportunity to enter your end of life, the moment of death and what may follow, with greater awareness and freedom.Here, you will find pages with more information on End of Life Initiatives and Home Funeral Guidance as well as about CEOLT and Caroline Yongue. Our calendar of workshops and retreats lists upcoming educational opportunities. For private consultations to individuals and tailored facilitations to groups, please contact us.


SheVille Values & Mission

Our Values

We value and have as our guiding principles the feminist ideals of diversity, creativity, balance, collaboration, compassion, sustainability, and environmental preservation that challenge greed, exploitation, disrespect and domination.

Our Mission 

  • to counter attitudes and actions that support racism, sexism, misogyny and xenophobia
  • to counter information that encourages or disregards environmental abuse and waste
  • to feature those elements of community that energize, inspire and encourage diversity and  collaboration
  • to provide a safe and supportive web environment for our readers, advertisers and contributors
  • to provide our readers with a current resource about local and regional people and events,  women’s lives, education and health, the arts and arts education, sustainability and the environment 
  • to promote and give affordable visibility to local and regional entrepreneurs, educators, farmers, artists and writers

We provide local, regional, national and international information about women’s lives and education, regional performing and visual arts and writing, the environment, green living and sustainability and regional Western North Carolina businesses, people and events.

SheVille.org of Western North Carolina is a one-of-a-kind women’s online, community magazine for EVERYONE.  Contact Jean or Rain at (828)215-2915 or info@sheville.org


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