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SheVille Team

We are a one-of-a-kind magazine that provides local, regional, national and international information about women’s lives and education, performing and visual arts and writing, the environment, green living and sustainability and regional Western North Carolina business, people and events. “Villages preserve culture: dress, food and dance are a few examples. As villages grow in population and turn into towns, local cafes make way for large American chains. Handmade leather sandals are discarded for a pair of Western sneakers. Due to its small size, a village fosters a tight-knit sense of community. Justpeace.org explains the meaning of the African proverb, “It takes a village,” by stating that a sense of community is critical to maintaining a healthy society. Village members hold a wealth of information regarding their heritage: they know about the ancient traditions, methods of production and the resources of the land. When villages become dispersed or exterminated in times of war, this anthropological knowledge disappears. Large cities are not as conducive to growing and producing foods such as fruits and vegetables. Villages, on the other hand, usually have ample amounts of land and other resources necessary for growing conditions.” The Importance of Villages by Catherine Capozzi Our Mission SheVille.org provides readers with information important to women’s lives and well-being. We focus primarily on the areas of education & health, business & finance, the arts & the environment. We are particularly interested in local & regional resources, organizations & events.

ADVICE FOR THIS STRESSFUL TIME from Dawn Starks in Simple Money

No debate, these are stressful times.  While this pandemic continues to unfold, here are some suggestions I compiled for the clients of my planning firm for how to cope with the stress that all of us are feeling.

I have divided it into three sections: advice for all, advice for those already retired or close to retirement, and those still in their working years.


USE OUR MAP to Support Local Sustainable Farmers Near You and Madison BioBlitz!

Protect Our Rivers By Supporting Sustainable Farms

Many small farms in our mountain region have lost business due to the COVID-19 outbreak. In addition, large-scale meat operations in North Carolina are one of the leading contributors to water pollution in the state. Buying from sustainable local farms now is a way to not only feed your family but to protect our environment.

We’ve compiled a map of farms in our region that feed us while using practices that support healthy rivers, lakes and streams. Check out the map to find sustainable farms in your local watershed, and sign the pledge to support sustainable farms here.


Featured Book & CD: TOWARD the CLEARING, by Jean Cassidy

We’ve done a re-run of my poetry book and CD, Toward the Clearing, more copies available!

Jean describes her poetry as “a choreography of words” as she joins her poetry with musical accompaniment. Her poetry book includes a CD of the poems accompanied by oboe, English horn, flute, piano, fretless banjo, violin, and balafon in the final product that is a beautiful collaboration with regional musicians and readers. Jean’s work has previously been published in It’s All Relative – Tales from the Tree,  in The Great Smokies Review – Online Publication through UNC Asheville, in Speckled Trout Review, fall 2019 in These Trees by Ruthie Rosauer

In Ordinary Time  Click to hear Susan Shinn read “In Ordinary Time” with piano accompaniment by Lytingale


THIS IS WATER MANAGEMENT: St. Joseph Sisters create massive rain garden in New Orleans

On a beautiful June day in 2006, St. Joseph Sr. Joan Laplace was driving back to New Orleans after visiting the Gulf Coast with some sisters when her phone rang. It was from a sister in Cincinnati, asking how far Laplace was from Mirabeau, the New Orleans provincial house of  the Congregation of the Sisters of St. Joseph.

“There’s been a fire,” the sister on the phone said. “How soon can you get there?” Laplace arrived to find the campus filled with firefighters and equipment. A helicopter ferried loads of water from the nearby Bayou St. John.  CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE


How Do Credit Cards Work? What Should I Be Doing With My Money? FREE WEBINAR

BY ELLEVEST TEAM

If you’ve never had a credit card before, trying to learn more about them can be … a lot. There are so many options to choose from, and the world of credit cards has some hefty vocab that doesn’t always get defined.

But once you learn the basics, credit cards are pretty straightforward. And once you have an understanding of how they work and how to use them responsibly, they can be a useful tool in your financial toolbox. 


The search for mass graves from the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre…important even if it finds nothing

The scientists and historians involved in the search for unmarked burial sites from the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre are tamping down expectations about what will be found.

“Be realistic,” Dr. Phoebe Stubblefield told the Mass Graves Investigation Public Oversight Committee last week. “A century has passed.”

Stubblefield, a University of Florida forensic anthropologist specializing in human identification, thinks the committee’s work could well be successful, but before the search into some long forgotten corners of the city begins, she wants everyone to know it may not work out ideally. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE


PISGAH LEGAL SERVICES Resources for Our Community

Pisgah Legal is creating timely, reliable and up-to-date information to help people navigate through various systems. Please check them out and share widely.

For Renters: On May 30, Governor Cooper extended a moratorium on evictions until June 20, 2020. Check out this updated information with common questions and answers for renters.                                                                             


ANTIRACISM, Belonging in the Outdoors & True Allyship

MountainTrue knows that Black lives matter, and we encourage our members to learn about and fight examples of systemic racism – not only during the current protests, but for the long haul. Our Board is currently in a process of strengthening the racial justice lens of our work to create meaningful change within our organization and region.


WOMANSONG OF ASHEVILLE – Public Message Affirming the Rights of All People

Affirming the rights of ALL people and demonstrating care and respect for everyone are key to Womansong performances and to our choir. Our shared, national history of white supremacy and horrific violence against black people, LGBTQ folks, native communities, women, and many other groups is at the heart of the civil unrest we’re experiencing.


FREE FROM FEAR CAMPAIGN – Southerners On New Ground (SONG)

After years of shifting political waters and we know that in order to continue to build the power we need in the South, regardless of who controls the White House, we have to be more clear about who and how we are in relationship to each other as Southern people who are working to earn the respect of future generations. Our very lives depend on it.


Jennifer Carroll Foy Wants To Be The First Black Woman Governor In America

By Prachi Gupta in Elle

In January, Jennifer Carroll Foy helped end nearly 50 years of inaction on the Equal Rights Amendment by leading a push to make Virginia the final state needed to ratify the landmark women’s rights legislation to the Constitution. Today, the 38 year old freshman state delegate and criminal defense attorney took on an entirely new, historic challenge, announcing she is running to become the next governor of Virginia.  


I am Korean yet culturally black

Korean American author speaks about her journey to find true self

By Kang Hyun-kyung

Cindy Wilson, author of “Too Much Soul: The Journey of an Asian Southern Belle,” was born I Wol-yang in Seoul and adopted by African-American parents in 1975 when she was a few months old. Her name was changed to Cindy and she was brought to America by her adoptive parents the following year.Unlike some other adoptees who have spent a great deal of time and energy to find their birth parents, Wilson has never tried to find her roots. She said she considers her adoptive parents, not birth parents, to be her true family.


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