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Women's Lives & Education

Why study women, minorities, or other controversial subjects at all? The answer is: a good liberal education (liberal as in “freedom”) teaches people to think both “inside the box” and “outside the box”.  Gender studies programs can encourage students to creatively examine their surroundings and learn to identify both the empowering and dis-empowering properties of words and deeds and to consider the relationship of race, gender, class and ethnicity as well as the manifestation and effects of gender bias in society.   Your suggestions and submissions are welcomed.
Research on Women and Education     Women’s Media Center     OnTrack Women’s Financial Empowerment Center     The Community Foundation of WNC – Women for Women grants     Western Women’s Business Center     Womansong of Asheville Women’s Chorus & New Start Program

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REPRISE from 2017: So, What Do We Do? We Keep on RESISTING!

By Jane Edwards-Spence (SheVille’s personal political analyst…aren’t we lucky?)

Treason against the United States is defined in Article III of the Constitution as “levying war against [the United States], or in adhering to their enemies, giving them aid and comfort.” Cleaving to, or joining an enemy, as President Donald J. Trump did today, and in the past, is treason. Pure and simple.


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Resources for White Parents Raising Anti-Racist Kids

Kriya Lendzion – Evergreen Community Charter School,  Last edit: 7/15/20

Research shows that kids as young as toddlers are actively learning about race and ethnicity, forming stereotypes and biases based on the toxic images and messages that we are all soaking in. When parents ignore the topic of race, children learn that racial diversity and inequities are too scary to talk about, don’t truly exist, or aren’t important enough to address. Therefore, it is critical that parents learn to intentionally talk about race and racism and not leave children on their own to learn about it from the media or others. As parents, we have the greatest power to disassemble harmful messages, and shape kids that not only live in awareness, acceptance and kindness, but as active change agents in dismantling racism for our next generation. Here are some resources to help! CLICK TO CONTINUE


Food

Asheville Restaurants Offering OUTDOOR DINING

in Explore Asheville

Asheville has long been called “Paris of the South” — thanks in part to its abundance of restaurants and cafes with outdoor and sidewalk seating.

As restaurants and the city of Asheville work to take important social distancing precautions in response to COVID-19, they now are expanding outdoor areas for waiting and dining. These expanded areas are known as “parklets.”

The list below includes restaurants known to have outside seating. Restaurants are working to meet new health and safety guidelines so hours of operation and services may change. It is recommended that you contact restaurants in advance to learn whether they are open and what outdoor seating options are currently available. The state of North Carolina requires masks inside restaurants (when you’re not eating). Masks are required outside if social distancing is not possible.  CLICK TO CONTINUE


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Instead Of Telling Kids To ‘Be Careful’, Try These Phrases Instead

When I was 11, I spent most of the summer at a rope swing with my friends. It was along the Provo River, middle of nowhere Utah. No parents around, just kids. More or less, it was a husky brown rope strapped to a dying tree, and we spent hours there, working on back flips, and front flips, and belly flops. 

Sometimes we climbed up into the tree and jumped into the river from dangerous heights. Sometimes we flat out fell from the tree. Sometimes we got into fights. No one ever, not once, told us to be careful. We got into trouble, and we figured out how to get out of it. This was back in the mid 90s, back when parents could let their children go off and do something like that. CLICK TO CONTINUE


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WHAT’S INTERSECTIONALITY? Let These Scholars Explain the Theory and Its History

BY ARICA L. COLEMAN in Time Magazine

 

UPDATED: MARCH 29, 2019 2:58 PM ET | ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED: MARCH 28, 2019 7:39 PM EDT

Women’s History Month has been observed in the United States in March for decades, its date unchanging. But as this month draws to a close, it’s worth noting that the women whose stories comprise that history have changed.

The movement to expand feminism beyond the provincialism of mainstream discourse is now in its sixth decade. One place where that change is clear is at the Feminist Freedom Warriors Project (FFW) at Syracuse University, the brainchild of transnational feminist scholars Linda E. Carty and Chandra Talpade Mohanty. Their 2015 survey of transnational feminism was the foundation for FFW, a first-of-its-kind digital video archive focused on the struggles of women of color of the Global South (Africa, India and Latin America) and North (U.S., Canada, Japan). “FFW is a project about cross-generation histories of feminist activism,” its founders, Carty and Mohanty, said in an email, “addressing economic, anti-racist, social justice issues across national borders.”

CLICK TO CONTINUE


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A TRUE DAUGHTER OF THE CONFEDERACY has written what should be the last words on monument removal.

By Caroline Randall Williams in Reddit June 26, 2020

I have rape-colored skin. My light-brown-blackness is a living testament to the rules, the practices, the causes of the Old South.

If there are those who want to remember the legacy of the Confederacy, if they want monuments, well, then, my body is a monument. My skin is a monument.


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Meet Qahera, the Muslim superheroine fighting bigots instead of comic book villains

created by Egyptian illustrator and designer Deena Mohamed, written by Marta Vidal in The Lily

“I can hear it! The sound of … misogynistic trash!” says Qahera. Carrying a sword as sharp as her wit and wearing a veil that is sometimes used to conceal her identity, the Muslim superheroine is out to fight against injustice.

Her “super hearing” helps her detect misogynists, but also racists and Islamophobes. In some comic strips she defends women from harassers, in others she goes after groups that denigrate and try to silence Muslim women. Qahera can be translated as vanquisher or conqueror — and if you add “al” before Qahera, it’s the Arabic name of Egypt’s capital, Cairo. The character was created by Egyptian illustrator and designer Deena Mohamed. CLICK TO CONTINUE

 

 


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PISGAH LEGAL SERVICES Resources for Our Community

Pisgah Legal is creating timely, reliable and up-to-date information to help people navigate through various systems. Please check them out and share widely.

For Renters: On May 30, Governor Cooper extended a moratorium on evictions until June 20, 2020. Check out this updated information with common questions and answers for renters.                                                                             


Ive Changed

REPRISE – 62 Million Reasons I’m Not the Same Anymore

by John Pavlovitz

Some people tell me that I’ve changed, that I’ve become more confrontational and irritable, that I am less tolerant of disagreement now. They say that I seem angrier, that I’m more political. They tell me that I’m not the gentle, loving soul I once was and they regularly click their tongues against the roof of their mouths in judgment, lamenting the person they say I used to be.


Photography

TONI FRISSELL PHOTOGRAPHY: Magnificent Pictures Captured By One Of The Influential Female Photographer Of The 20th Century

By Jacob Aberto in BYGONELY

On the lists of great photographers of the 20th century, the names are usually male, Guy BourdinAddison ScurlockPhilippe Halsman, and  Norman Parkinson. There are exceptions such as Arbus, Vivian MaierNina Leen? Some of these artists are not admired for their work or they are considered as portrait photographer or fashion photographer.


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A New Album Re-Creates The Work Of The 1st Known Female Composers In America

By AVERY KEATLEY in NPR

Chris Herbert was in a hurry. The vocalist and musicologist was studying the Ephrata Codex — an 18th century music manuscript — in the Library of Congress, which meant he was on the clock. Herbert was working on digitizing the Codex. He flipped through the pages, taking pictures of each one, with no time to pause.

A few weeks later while on tour in Europe, he took time to examine his work and noticed something he hadn’t seen before. Zooming in on the images he’d hastily snapped in the Library of Congress, he saw names written in small font beside the musical compositions. Three of those names belonged to women: Sister Föben, Sister Katura and Sister Hanna. CLICK TO CONTINUE

Thanks to Linda Kooiker for offering this article.


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MAB SEGREST on building a Southern freedom movement for all

By Grace Abels July 16, 2020

In 1988, Southern Exposure, the print forerunner to Facing South, published an issue titled “Mint Juleps, Wisteria, and Queers” that focused on lesbian and gay experiences in the South. It featured stories on the budding gay press, lesbian love in the face of military suppression, rural Radical Faerie communities, queer bar culture, and the emerging popularity of drag.  CLICK TO CONTINUE


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The Status of Women in North Carolina: Health and Wellness

Publication Date: June 2019 Click here to view full report 

The health and wellness of women in North Carolina has improved in some ways, yet not all women are equally benefiting from this progress. Wide disparities persist in disease and mortality rates and incidence of sexually transmitted infections by race and ethnicity, as well as by county. Ensuring that women can access the health care services they need – including for mental health and substance abuse – is vital to the health and well-being of women in North Carolina.

Additionally, women’s experiences of intimate partner violence show the detrimental impact this violence has on women in the state. The Status of Women in North Carolina: Health & Wellness is the second in a series of four publications that provide data and policy recommendations to improve North Carolina women’s status in several key areas.  CLICK TO CONTINUE


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