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SHEVILLAGE

Here’s a compilation of some of the fabulous, year-round fairs, festival offerings and stuff to do that the Western North Carolina region has to offer. Festival organizers: please contact: info@sheville.org if you wish to be considered for inclusion into SheVille of WNC.
Outdoor Adventures     Hot Springs Natural Hot Mineral Waters     Chimney Rock Park     History at Hand     North Carolina Festivals     Explore Asheville Events Calendar     Asheville Herb Festival

 

Why I train grandmothers to treat depression | Dixon Chibanda

Here’s a wonderful TED Talk on YouTube. Dixon Chibanda is one of 12 psychiatrists in Zimbabwe — for a population of more than 16 million. Realizing that his country would never be able to scale traditional methods of treating those with mental health issues, Chibanda helped to develop a beautiful solution powered by a limitless resource: grandmothers. In this extraordinary, inspirational talk, learn more about the friendship bench program, which trains grandmothers in evidence-based talk therapy and brings care, and hope, to those in need.’ CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

This post is offered by Cynthia Turner 

 


The woman behind Elizabeth Warren’s blueprint for the presidency

Rebecca Brenner is a PhD candidate in history at American University in Washington, DC.

Last week, Sen. Elizabeth Warren delivered a speech before her largest crowd yet, in Washington Square Park in New York. She invoked the memory of former labor secretary Frances Perkins, a witness to the 1911 Triangle Shirtwaist fire, which took place adjacent to the site of Warren’s speech to argue that “big structural change” is possible through a combination of relentless activism outside of government and a leader like Perkins or Warren herself on the inside.

Warren, a Democratic presidential candidate, isn’t the first politician to use public memory of a historic figure to convey her message, but Perkins, who rarely receives national attention today, is a unique choice. Although Warren’s speech marks a key point in remembering Perkins, it also offers insight into the candidate’s hopes for a potential presidency. She depicted Perkins as a trailblazing female politician who fused progressive idealism and pragmatic policy change, exactly what she hopes to be.

CLICK TO CONTINUE


ADRIENNE RICH on the Political Power of Poetry and Its Role in the Immigrant Experience

One summer evening not long ago, on a rainy Brooklyn rooftop, a friend — a brilliant friend who studies the cosmos and writes uncommonly poetic novels — stunned me with an improbable, deceptively simple yet enormous question: “What does poetry do?”

I fumbled for Baldwin: “The poets [are] the only people who know the truth about us. Soldiers don’t. Statesmen don’t. Priests don’t. Union leaders don’t. Only poets.” And then I mumbled something about how poetry gives shape to our experiences through language, thus conferring validity and dignity upon them, enlarging our access to our own humanity. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE


FROM COHABITATION TO COHOUSING: Older baby boomers create living arrangements to suit new needs

The Conversation <us.newsletter@theconversation.com>

One of the major questions of growing older is, “where do I want to live as I age?” For many baby boomers, an important goal is staying independent as long as possible. Many in this generation desire to age in their homes and make their own choices as long as possible.

Living preferences are changing, as are relationship patterns, such as greater numbers of mid- and late-life adults who are single, childless, or live at a distance from adult children. “Senior cohousing communities,” or SCCs, are a form of communal living that integrates common areas and private residences. They promote choice and independence, which are particularly important for the aging baby boom generation.  CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

 


The hidden story of two African American women looking out from the pages of a 19th-century book

by Kate Clarke Lemay, Smithsonian Institution and Martha S. Jones, Johns Hopkins University

We are two historians whose work focuses on American art and on how African Americans have shaped the story of American democracy. Our two subject areas converged recently when one of us had a question, and the other helped her research the answer.

Kate was in the midst of organizing the National Portrait Gallery’s exhibition, “Votes for Women: A Portrait of Persistence,” commemorating the more than 80-year movement for women to obtain the right to vote. This exhibition is part of the Smithsonian American Women’s History Initiative, Because of Her Story. While doing her research, Kate encountered a character in history whose story she didn’t know, but who she anticipated would be important to the history the museum wanted to tell.

Who was Mary E. Harper? That’s the question Kate set out to answer. CLICK TO CONTINUE

 


The World’s Happiest People Have a Beautifully Simple Way to Tackle Loneliness

in Pocket Worthy

QuartzJenny Anderson

Sometimes a place for people to come together is what’s needed most.

Toad, a 20-year-old Danish woman living in Copenhagen, has been lonely her whole life. She is autistic, and as a child, did not have any friends. When she moved from the country to the city, not much changed. “They says it’s a phase, but a phase becomes a life,” she says, surrounded by six other young adults in a cozy apartment in Copenhagen—all of whom are working on becoming less lonely.


THE MATILDA EFFECT: the misappropriating of women’s scientific achievements

in Wikipedia

The Matilda effect is a bias against acknowledging the achievements of those women scientists whose work is attributed to their male colleagues. This effect was first described by suffragist and abolitionist Matilda Joslyn Gage (1826–98) in her essay, “Woman as Inventor” (first published as a tract in 1870 and in the North American Review in 1883). The term “Matilda effect” was coined in 1993 by science historian Margaret W. Rossiter.


THE MYTH OF SOULMATES: Advice from someone who’s been married for 10 years

by Jessica Valenti in GEN

Ten years ago today, I got married in an upstate New York ceremony that I planned down to the dinner napkin placement and band’s song order. I wore gray instead of white — I had just written a book decrying America’s obsession with virginity — and had spent the two previous nights meticulously punching out leaf-shaped pieces of paper with my then fiancé, pasting them on seating cards. It was a lovely and love-filled day.


“MIRA LEHR: A Walk in the Garden” — the Eco-Feminist’s 60th Anniversary of Visionary Artmaking

Mira Lehr in front of Creation (triptych), 2018  

At the Jewish Museum of Florida-FIU for Art Basel Season

The Jewish Museum of Florida-FIU headlines Art Basel season with Mira Lehr: A Walk in the Garden featuring all new work created by the nationally renowned eco-feminist artist. 


GRETA THUNBERG Makes TIME’s List Of Women Who Will Change The World

by Liam Gilliver in PBN Plant Based News

‘Young people across the world have followed her path, striking and marching to make clear to adults and decision-makers that this is a true emergency’.

Teenage climate campaigner Greta Thunberg has made it onto TIME Magazine’s list of 15 women who will change the world.


Historic Markers Project – Buncombe County

by Ami Worthen

(This story was written for the Buncombe County page in the December 2017 issue of Urban News.)

Leaders from the historically African American neighborhoods of Shiloh, Burton Street, East End and Stumptown are partnering with the Asheville-Buncombe African American Heritage Commission (AAHC) on the installation of historic markers in their neighborhoods.


Sonia Johnson, Equal Rights Activist in 1936

Sonia Ann Johnson, née Harris, was born a fifth-generation Mormon in Malad, Idaho. She graduated from Utah State University, pursuing her M.A. and Ed.D. from Rutgers University after marrying, and through many moves and pregnancies. She taught English at American and foreign universities, working part-time as a teacher while accompanying her husband on overseas jobs. The family returned to the U.S. in 1976, buying a house in Virginia, one of the states that had not ratified the Equal Rights Amendment. Johnson became such an ardent supporter of the ERA that she was excommunicated by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in 1979. She exposed the role of the wealthy Mormon Church in sabotaging passage of the ERA. She went on a 37-day hunger strike in the Illinois statehouse in 1982 during the last days of the ERA countdown to symbolize how “women hunger for justice.”


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