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5 Things Travelers Can Do Now to Combat Racism

by Tiana Attride in HERE

Five first steps travelers can take to be an anti-racist ally wherever they go.

As the Black Lives Matter movement gains traction worldwide, industries across the board are gearing up to diversify at last—and the travel and hospitality industries, like most, have plenty of work to do. 

While many changes need to take place on an industry level, individual travelers can still do their part to work against racism on their own personal trips. Although there are countless ways to combat racism in everyday life, these first five steps present a clear path to rearranging the way you—and your fellow travelers—think and act when you go out into the world. CLICK TO CONTINUE

 


Meet Qahera, the Muslim superheroine fighting bigots instead of comic book villains

created by Egyptian illustrator and designer Deena Mohamed, written by Marta Vidal in The Lily

“I can hear it! The sound of … misogynistic trash!” says Qahera. Carrying a sword as sharp as her wit and wearing a veil that is sometimes used to conceal her identity, the Muslim superheroine is out to fight against injustice.

Her “super hearing” helps her detect misogynists, but also racists and Islamophobes. In some comic strips she defends women from harassers, in others she goes after groups that denigrate and try to silence Muslim women. Qahera can be translated as vanquisher or conqueror — and if you add “al” before Qahera, it’s the Arabic name of Egypt’s capital, Cairo. The character was created by Egyptian illustrator and designer Deena Mohamed. CLICK TO CONTINUE

 

 


BLUE RIDGE MUSIC TRAILS: The Trail Ahead: Current Trends and Innovations in the Music Industry

Join us for a series of free online workshops where you’ll find ideas and options for virtual opportunities for the music business. The three workshops will feature expert panelists including International Bluegrass Music Association (IBMA) award-winning artists who will share with participants what they’ve learned during the COVID-19 crisis. The workshops will be offered via Zoom and livestreamed on Facebook @blueridgemusictrails. Please register for the individual workshops below or Learn More Here.


The search for mass graves from the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre…important even if it finds nothing

The scientists and historians involved in the search for unmarked burial sites from the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre are tamping down expectations about what will be found.

“Be realistic,” Dr. Phoebe Stubblefield told the Mass Graves Investigation Public Oversight Committee last week. “A century has passed.”

Stubblefield, a University of Florida forensic anthropologist specializing in human identification, thinks the committee’s work could well be successful, but before the search into some long forgotten corners of the city begins, she wants everyone to know it may not work out ideally. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE


PISGAH LEGAL SERVICES Resources for Our Community

Pisgah Legal is creating timely, reliable and up-to-date information to help people navigate through various systems. Please check them out and share widely.

For Renters: On May 30, Governor Cooper extended a moratorium on evictions until June 20, 2020. Check out this updated information with common questions and answers for renters.                                                                             


A TRUE DAUGHTER OF THE CONFEDERACY has written what should be the last words on monument removal.

By Caroline Randall Williams in Reddit June 26, 2020

I have rape-colored skin. My light-brown-blackness is a living testament to the rules, the practices, the causes of the Old South.

If there are those who want to remember the legacy of the Confederacy, if they want monuments, well, then, my body is a monument. My skin is a monument.


CREATED 150 YEARS AGO, the Justice Department’s First Mission Was to Protect Black Rights

By Bryan Greene in SMITHSONIANMAGAZINE.COM

Amos T. Akerman was an unlikely figure to head the newly formed Department of Justice. In 1870, the United States was still working to bind up the nation’s wounds torn open by the Civil War. During this period of Reconstruction, the federal government committed itself to guaranteeing full citizenship rights to all Americans, regardless of race. At the forefront of that effort was Akerman, a former Democrat and enslaver from Georgia, and a former officer in the Confederate Army.


WHAT’S INTERSECTIONALITY? Let These Scholars Explain the Theory and Its History

BY ARICA L. COLEMAN in Time Magazine

 

UPDATED: MARCH 29, 2019 2:58 PM ET | ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED: MARCH 28, 2019 7:39 PM EDT

Women’s History Month has been observed in the United States in March for decades, its date unchanging. But as this month draws to a close, it’s worth noting that the women whose stories comprise that history have changed.

The movement to expand feminism beyond the provincialism of mainstream discourse is now in its sixth decade. One place where that change is clear is at the Feminist Freedom Warriors Project (FFW) at Syracuse University, the brainchild of transnational feminist scholars Linda E. Carty and Chandra Talpade Mohanty. Their 2015 survey of transnational feminism was the foundation for FFW, a first-of-its-kind digital video archive focused on the struggles of women of color of the Global South (Africa, India and Latin America) and North (U.S., Canada, Japan). “FFW is a project about cross-generation histories of feminist activism,” its founders, Carty and Mohanty, said in an email, “addressing economic, anti-racist, social justice issues across national borders.”

CLICK TO CONTINUE


ADVICE FOR THIS STRESSFUL TIME from Dawn Starks in Simple Money

No debate, these are stressful times.  While this pandemic continues to unfold, here are some suggestions I compiled for the clients of my planning firm for how to cope with the stress that all of us are feeling.

I have divided it into three sections: advice for all, advice for those already retired or close to retirement, and those still in their working years.


ANTIRACISM, Belonging in the Outdoors & True Allyship

MountainTrue knows that Black lives matter, and we encourage our members to learn about and fight examples of systemic racism – not only during the current protests, but for the long haul. Our Board is currently in a process of strengthening the racial justice lens of our work to create meaningful change within our organization and region.


WOMANSONG OF ASHEVILLE – Public Message Affirming the Rights of All People

Affirming the rights of ALL people and demonstrating care and respect for everyone are key to Womansong performances and to our choir. Our shared, national history of white supremacy and horrific violence against black people, LGBTQ folks, native communities, women, and many other groups is at the heart of the civil unrest we’re experiencing.


FREE FROM FEAR CAMPAIGN – Southerners On New Ground (SONG)

After years of shifting political waters and we know that in order to continue to build the power we need in the South, regardless of who controls the White House, we have to be more clear about who and how we are in relationship to each other as Southern people who are working to earn the respect of future generations. Our very lives depend on it.


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