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5 Phrases Your Black Friend Wishes You’d Stop Saying

By Ajah Hales in M/ZORA


REFLECTING ON MARTIN LUTHER KING JR.’S DREAM AND LEGACY

by Steve Hochstadt in History News Network

I went to the annual city-sponsored celebration of Martin Luther King, Jr., on Monday. Jacksonville’s Mayor, Andy Ezard, inaugurated these yearly breakfasts a decade ago. Every year a speaker helps us think about what MLK said, what he wanted to happen, and how he lived. There is often music, and we sing “Lift Every Voice and Sing”, a hopeful song: from “the dark past”, “the gloomy past” “that with tears has been watered”, to the present, “the place for which our fathers signed”, to the future, “Let us march on till victory is won. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE


The 15 Books to Read by Women in 2020

In the Washington Post Lily Lines – Story by Neema Roshania Patel – Illustrations by Maria Alaconada Brooks

It’s a new year and like many, you may have made a resolution to read more. Or maybe you’re simply looking for the next great novel you won’t be able to put down. Either way, we’ve got the list for you. 

This roundup focuses on fiction titles, all by women, all set for release in the first half of this year. We hope you enjoy it and find a book that sticks with you. The kind you can’t put down and can’t stop thinking about once you’re done with it. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE


The Lost Words

The Lost Words – in Daily Good News that Inspires

by Jackie Morris, syndicated from dumbofeather.com in the Daily Good

It has been described as a ‘cultural phenomenon’ by The Guardian, but really it is just a book of spell-poems and paintings. Created as a response to the realisation that we humans were losing sight of the common species, the everyday names of wild things that share our earth, the book’s aim was to re-connect, re-focus, revitalise. As Robert said ‘we do not love what we cannot name, and what we do not love we will not save’.  CONTINUE


What Sex Means for World Peace

The evidence is clear: The best predictor of a state’s stability is how its women are treated.In the academic field of security studies, realpolitik dominates. Those who adhere to this worldview are committed to accepting empirical evidence when it is placed before their eyes, to see the world as it “really” is and not as it ideally should be. As Walter Lippmann wrote, “We must not substitute for the world as it is an imaginary world.” Click here to read the entire article (This article was suggested by Edward O. Raiola, Ph.D.


NC BOARD OF ELECTIONS LIST OF ACCEPTABLE IDs: Voters Will Be Asked to Show Photo ID Beginning in 2020

Beginning in 2020, North Carolina voters will be asked to provide photo identification when voting in-person or absentee-by-mail, with some exceptions.

Voters may provide any type of acceptable photo identification. More than 130 types of ID will be accepted. For a list of acceptable IDs, see below. 


‘May the best woman win.’ from the New York Times

The New York Times ‘ editorial board took the extraordinary step on Sunday of endorsing two Democratic candidates for the party’s nomination: Sens. Amy Klobuchar and Elizabeth Warren. “Both the radical and the realist models warrant serious consideration,” the Times wrote. “If there were ever a time to be open to new ideas, it is now. If there were ever a time to seek stability, now is it. That’s why we’re endorsing the most effective advocates for each approach.” New York Times

Photo Credit: Liz Preyer, Asheville


How Educators Are Rethinking The Way They Teach Immigration History

BY ANNA-CAT BRIGIDA

In the summer of 2017, before her senior year of high school, Isabelle Doerre-Torres met Carlos,* a Salvadoran immigrant on the verge of deportation. Doerre-Torres was an intern at a legal rights organization. She soon learned that Carlos came to Boston nearly two decades ago after he fled gang violence. He’d put down roots in a working class community, where his two daughters were born. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE


A LIBERAL EXPLANATION OF SOME SIMPLE BELIEFS – I just want to be understood…

by Larry Allen

An open letter to friends and family who are shocked to discover I’m a liberal… I’ve always been a liberal, but that doesn’t mean what a lot of you apparently think it does. Let’s break it down, shall we? Because quite frankly, I’m getting a little tired of being told what I believe and what I stand for. Spoiler alert: Not every liberal is the same, though the majority of liberals I know think along roughly these same lines:


The Surprising Science of Alpha Males (Ahem!) – Just remember: don’t call them bullies

by TEDMED 

In this video, Frans de Waal, PhD, a primatologist and ethologist at Emory University in Atlanta, explores the ways that human behavior around community, solidarity, and leadership link directly to primates’ behavior, adding context to our understanding of what it means to be a human “alpha” female or male.


WNC LEGACY: FINE ART &CRAFT- On a Personal Note: John Cram

By Jim Murphy in The Laurel of Asheville 2016

In the early 1970s, John Cram visited Asheville and says, “I fell in love with the place.” He moved here and found that Asheville was sitting squarely between the mountains and the doldrums. Beyond the town’s natural attractions, there was not a lot to love. And there was not a lot of demand for a 25-year-old holding a communications degree with a concentration in film. (John calls it “a bachelor’s degree in nothing.”) But just beneath that liberal arts background lurked the soul of an entrepreneur.


CITY OF ASHEVILLE publishes Affordable Housing Guide

One of the most significant barriers to economic prosperity for America’s lowest-income families is the lack of decent, accessible, and affordable homes. Research shows that when people have stable homes that they can afford, they are better able to find employment, achieve economic mobility, age in place, perform better in school, and maintain improved health. 


MOUNTAIN TRUE Raleigh Report Yearly Wrap Up: The Budget, Wins for the Environment and Looking Ahead to 2020

It’s been a strange year at the North Carolina General Assembly.

There have been lots of votes – and vetoes – on various budget bills, but no final state budget. There was just a smattering of problematic environmental bills, the worst of which either didn’t pass or were defanged before becoming law.


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