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SIGN UP FOR HEALTH INSURANCE NOW Affordable Care Act’s Seventh Open Enrollment Nov. 1 – Dec. 15

Sign Up for Health Insurance Nov. 1 – Dec. 15, 2019

Free Walk-in Events Happening in November Throughout WNC

Do you have questions about choosing affordable, quality health insurance? Pisgah Legal Services can help with free, unbiased, in-person assistance for the Affordable Care Act’s (ACA) Seventh Open Enrollment, taking place from Nov. 1 to Dec. 15, 2019.


Men Are Not Big Babies

by Shannon Ashley in Medium/Equality

“They are trapped and they don’t even have the language to talk about how they feel about being trapped, because the language that exists to express the full range of human emotion is still viewed as sensitive and feminine.” – Michael Ian Black

For whatever wrong reason, I have in the past been guilty of perpetuating the myth of the “man cold” and commenting that “men are babies.” As I get older, it’s one type of sentiment that I have nixed from my vocabulary.

When we talk about toxic masculinity and mainstream culture, it seems to me that both men and women have been subject to different and varying degrees of infantilization.

CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE


The World’s Happiest People Have a Beautifully Simple Way to Tackle Loneliness

in Pocket Worthy

QuartzJenny Anderson

Sometimes a place for people to come together is what’s needed most.

Toad, a 20-year-old Danish woman living in Copenhagen, has been lonely her whole life. She is autistic, and as a child, did not have any friends. When she moved from the country to the city, not much changed. “They says it’s a phase, but a phase becomes a life,” she says, surrounded by six other young adults in a cozy apartment in Copenhagen—all of whom are working on becoming less lonely.


THE MYTH OF SOULMATES: Advice from someone who’s been married for 10 years

by Jessica Valenti in GEN

Ten years ago today, I got married in an upstate New York ceremony that I planned down to the dinner napkin placement and band’s song order. I wore gray instead of white — I had just written a book decrying America’s obsession with virginity — and had spent the two previous nights meticulously punching out leaf-shaped pieces of paper with my then fiancé, pasting them on seating cards. It was a lovely and love-filled day.


Pregnancy and Postpartum Depression

Offered by Tracey Fowler at Maryville University, St. Louis, Missouri

About Postpartum Depression

Having a baby is typically described as a time of joy. A time to celebrate the new little life that has been brought into this world. A time to be thankful for the family unit that has now been increased by one or more.

However, for some women, this life-altering event brings about feelings that aren’t quite as joyful, and begins a condition known as postpartum depression (PPD).


THE MATILDA EFFECT: the misappropriating of women’s scientific achievements

in Wikipedia

The Matilda effect is a bias against acknowledging the achievements of those women scientists whose work is attributed to their male colleagues. This effect was first described by suffragist and abolitionist Matilda Joslyn Gage (1826–98) in her essay, “Woman as Inventor” (first published as a tract in 1870 and in the North American Review in 1883). The term “Matilda effect” was coined in 1993 by science historian Margaret W. Rossiter.


FROM COHABITATION TO COHOUSING: Older baby boomers create living arrangements to suit new needs

The Conversation <us.newsletter@theconversation.com>

One of the major questions of growing older is, “where do I want to live as I age?” For many baby boomers, an important goal is staying independent as long as possible. Many in this generation desire to age in their homes and make their own choices as long as possible.

Living preferences are changing, as are relationship patterns, such as greater numbers of mid- and late-life adults who are single, childless, or live at a distance from adult children. “Senior cohousing communities,” or SCCs, are a form of communal living that integrates common areas and private residences. They promote choice and independence, which are particularly important for the aging baby boom generation.  CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

 


Sonia Johnson, Equal Rights Activist in 1936

Sonia Ann Johnson, née Harris, was born a fifth-generation Mormon in Malad, Idaho. She graduated from Utah State University, pursuing her M.A. and Ed.D. from Rutgers University after marrying, and through many moves and pregnancies. She taught English at American and foreign universities, working part-time as a teacher while accompanying her husband on overseas jobs. The family returned to the U.S. in 1976, buying a house in Virginia, one of the states that had not ratified the Equal Rights Amendment. Johnson became such an ardent supporter of the ERA that she was excommunicated by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in 1979. She exposed the role of the wealthy Mormon Church in sabotaging passage of the ERA. She went on a 37-day hunger strike in the Illinois statehouse in 1982 during the last days of the ERA countdown to symbolize how “women hunger for justice.”


MONEY AND MARRIAGE the Second Time Around

Money really is a defining factor in any relationship, but poses special challenges when you’re contemplating marrying for a second (or third) time.  In a 2012 study of 4,500 couples, fighting about money early on in a relationship was by far the most accurate predictor of divorce, regardless of income, debt or net worth.[1]  Researchers found that no matter how long the relationship had lasted, if there were monetary disagreements early on, there was a good chance that the overall satisfaction with the relationship would be poor.  So, if money plays such an important role in our relationships, what can we do about it?


THE NORTH CAROLINA ARBORETUM Exhibits and Events

For more than 30 years…Cultivating Connections between People, Plants and Places…amid a 434-acre public garden, The North Carolina Arboretum is located within the Bent Creek Experimental Forest just south of Asheville and adjacent to the Blue Ridge Parkway at Milepost 393. Surrounded and crisscrossed by forested coves and meandering creeks in the botanically diverse Southern Appalachian Mountains, The North Carolina Arboretum is set in one of the most beautiful natural settings in America.


Why I train grandmothers to treat depression | Dixon Chibanda

This post is offered by Cynthia Turner 

Here’s a wonderful TED Talk on YouTube. Dixon Chibanda is one of 12 psychiatrists in Zimbabwe — for a population of more than 16 million. Realizing that his country would never be able to scale traditional methods of treating those with mental health issues, Chibanda helped to develop a beautiful solution powered by a limitless resource: grandmothers. In this extraordinary, inspirational talk, learn more about the friendship bench program, which trains grandmothers in evidence-based talk therapy and brings care, and hope, to those in need.’ CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

 

 


The Feminist History of ‘Take Me Out to the Ball Game’

Described by Hall of Fame broadcaster Harry Caray as “a song that reflects the charisma of baseball,” ”Take Me Out to the Ball Game,” written in 1908 by lyricist Jack Norworth and composer Albert von Tilzer, is inextricably linked to America’s national pastime. But while most Americans can sing along as baseball fans “root, root, root for the home team,” few know the song’s feminist history.


GRETA THUNBERG Makes TIME’s List Of Women Who Will Change The World

by Liam Gilliver in PBN Plant Based News

‘Young people across the world have followed her path, striking and marching to make clear to adults and decision-makers that this is a true emergency’.

Teenage climate campaigner Greta Thunberg has made it onto TIME Magazine’s list of 15 women who will change the world.


Historic Markers Project – Buncombe County

by Ami Worthen

(This story was written for the Buncombe County page in the December 2017 issue of Urban News.)

Leaders from the historically African American neighborhoods of Shiloh, Burton Street, East End and Stumptown are partnering with the Asheville-Buncombe African American Heritage Commission (AAHC) on the installation of historic markers in their neighborhoods.


ADL and Aspen Institute Announce Inaugural Class of the Civil Society Fellowship

New York, NY, September 10, 2019 … ADL (Anti-Defamation League) and the Aspen Institute today announced the inaugural class of the Civil Society Fellowship: A Partnership of ADL and the Aspen Institute. This new Fellowship, part of the Aspen Global Leadership Network, aims to prepare and engage the next generation of community and civic leaders, activists and problem solvers from across the political spectrum.


How to get preschoolers ready to learn math

In The Conversation: If you’re a parent of a preschooler, you might be wondering how you can help set your child up for success once they enter kindergarten.

By now, you have probably heard of the importance of reading and talking to your child to support their language and literacy skills. You may have even made reading, talking and learning the ABCs part of your daily routine.

But did you know that you can also support your child’s math learning during everyday interactions at home? CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE


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