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Women's Lives & Education

Why study women, minorities, or other controversial subjects at all? The answer is: a good liberal education (liberal as in “freedom”) teaches people to think both “inside the box” and “outside the box”.  Gender studies programs can encourage students to creatively examine their surroundings and learn to identify both the empowering and dis-empowering properties of words and deeds and to consider the relationship of race, gender, class and ethnicity as well as the manifestation and effects of gender bias in society.   Your suggestions and submissions are welcomed.
Research on Women and Education     Women’s Media Center     OnTrack Women’s Financial Empowerment Center     The Community Foundation of WNC – Women for Women grants     Western Women’s Business Center     Womansong of Asheville Women’s Chorus & New Start Program

CITY OF ASHEVILLE publishes Affordable Housing Guide

One of the most significant barriers to economic prosperity for America’s lowest-income families is the lack of decent, accessible, and affordable homes. Research shows that when people have stable homes that they can afford, they are better able to find employment, achieve economic mobility, age in place, perform better in school, and maintain improved health. 


INSTITUTE FOR WOMEN’S POLICY RESEARCH – Informing policy. Inspiring change. Improving lives.


It’s Easy to Dismiss Debutante Balls, But Their History Can Help Us Understand Women’s Lives

by Kristen Richardson

The debutante ritual flourished roughly from 1780 to 1914—beginning with the first debutante ball in London and ending with the outbreak of World War I. During these years, Great Britain became the dominant power in the West, and its culture spread outward from the fashionable capital of London to provincial cities in Britain and eventually to its far-flung colonies.


DISCOVERING THE WISE WOMAN WITHIN Yearlong Training February to December 2020

Eight Saturdays
February to December 2020
 
Based in a culture of respect and self-knowledge, this unique “materia medica” developed by Corinna Wood provides tools to nourish your long-term thriving, from the roots up. The program supports the discovery of underlying needs and the development of healthy strategies to navigate the challenges we face as women in the world today.


Once Overlooked, Female Old Masters Take Center Stage

By Sotheby’s

n 1971, pioneering feminist art historian Linda Nochlin penned the now-iconic essay “Why Have There Been No Great Women Artists?” – a powerful critique on the ways in which women had been excluded from art history. Nearly 50 years later, the stories of the remarkable women who did break boundaries to achieve artistic acclaim are just beginning to be told. This January, Sotheby’s celebrates trailblazing female artists from the 16th through the 19th centuries with The Female Triumphant, a group of exceptional works of art that will be offered in our Masters Week sales. In spite of extraordinary obstacles, talented artists such as Elisabeth-Louise Vigée Le Brun, Fede GaliziaMichaelina Wautier and Elizabeth Gardner Bouguereau paved the way for future generations of artists everywhere. Below, four expert voices discuss how these artists changed painting forever.     Click to continue


WOMEN, PEACE & SECURITY : Women are critical to achieving sustainable peace

Our goal is to build the evidence-based case for a focus on women, peace, and security.

Georgetown University’s Institute for Women, Peace & Security seeks to promote a more stable, peaceful, and just world by focusing on the important role women play in preventing conflict and building peace, growing economies, and addressing global threats like climate change and violent extremism. We engage in rigorous research, host global convenings, advance strategic partnerships, and nurture the next generation of leaders. Housed within the Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown, the Institute is headed by the former U.S. Ambassador for Global Women’s Issues, Melanne Verveer.


The Feminist History of ‘Take Me Out to the Ball Game’

Described by Hall of Fame broadcaster Harry Caray as “a song that reflects the charisma of baseball,” ”Take Me Out to the Ball Game,” written in 1908 by lyricist Jack Norworth and composer Albert von Tilzer, is inextricably linked to America’s national pastime. But while most Americans can sing along as baseball fans “root, root, root for the home team,” few know the song’s feminist history.


GRATITUDE ABOUNDS at SheVille

Thank you to all our advertisers and readers. You’re the reason we’re here scouting out the most affirming and helpful information, events, and perspectives we can find during this time of enormous change. (Actually another reason is that it keeps us relatively sane.)

PLEASE send suggestions of content you’d like to see in SheVille, and spread the word to those you know who might want to advertise – reasonable rates for great exposure …special advertising rates apply December through March for “First Timers”. Questions? info@sheville.org

And here’s a thank you gift to you.


The Secret Society of Women Writers in Oxford in the 1920s

In Literary Hub: By Mo Moulton on the Legendary Mutual Admiration Society

It began in a quiet sort of way, over hot cocoa and toasted marshmallows in a student room at Somerville College, Oxford. One evening in November 1912, some new friends, all first-year students, gathered “to read aloud our literary efforts and to receive and deliver criticism.” They brought stories, poems, essays, plays, and fables, and they received far more than merely criticism. In the firelight, over economical treats, they created a space in which they could grow beyond the limitations of Edwardian girlhood and become complex, creative adults with a radically capacious notion of what it might mean to be both human and female. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

 


Women At Ernst & Young Instructed On How To Dress, Act Nicely Around Men

ISABELLA CARAPELLA / HUFFPOST

When women speak, they shouldn’t be shrill. Clothing must flatter, but short skirts are a no-no. After all, “sexuality scrambles the mind.” Women should look healthy and fit, with a “good haircut” and “manicured nails.” 

These were just a few pieces of advice that around 30 female executives at Ernst & Young received at a training held in the accounting giant’s gleaming new office in Hoboken, New Jersey, in June 2018.  CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

 


OURS IS NO BEDTIME STORY – Pauli Murray’s Dark Testament reintroduces a major Black poet.

BY ED PAVLIĆ  in Poetry Foundation

“Please don’t refer to me as ‘Mother Murray,’” Pauli Murray chided a reporter from the New Haven Register in 1977. The newspaper was running a story about the then-67-year-old Murray becoming the first African-American woman ordained an Episcopal priest. The achievement was another first in what had been a trailblazing life marked by both triumph and strife.


THE MYTH OF SOULMATES: Advice from someone who’s been married for 10 years

by Jessica Valenti in GEN

Ten years ago today, I got married in an upstate New York ceremony that I planned down to the dinner napkin placement and band’s song order. I wore gray instead of white — I had just written a book decrying America’s obsession with virginity — and had spent the two previous nights meticulously punching out leaf-shaped pieces of paper with my then fiancé, pasting them on seating cards. It was a lovely and love-filled day.


Pregnancy and Postpartum Depression

Offered by Tracey Fowler at Maryville University, St. Louis, Missouri

About Postpartum Depression

Having a baby is typically described as a time of joy. A time to celebrate the new little life that has been brought into this world. A time to be thankful for the family unit that has now been increased by one or more.

However, for some women, this life-altering event brings about feelings that aren’t quite as joyful, and begins a condition known as postpartum depression (PPD).


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