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Women's Lives & Education

Why study women, minorities, or other controversial subjects at all? The answer is: a good liberal education (liberal as in “freedom”) teaches people to think both “inside the box” and “outside the box”.  Gender studies programs can encourage students to creatively examine their surroundings and learn to identify both the empowering and dis-empowering properties of words and deeds and to consider the relationship of race, gender, class and ethnicity as well as the manifestation and effects of gender bias in society.   Your suggestions and submissions are welcomed.
Research on Women and Education     Women’s Media Center     OnTrack Women’s Financial Empowerment Center     The Community Foundation of WNC – Women for Women grants     Western Women’s Business Center     Womansong of Asheville Women’s Chorus & New Start Program

You’re Invited To Our Live Event: Why The Future Depends On The Female Vote

In every presidential election since 1980, voter turnout among women has surpassed that of men. This year, as we face so many challenges, the female vote will have the power to shape the future in historic ways. Join us for a virtual discussion on October 6th about why the fate of our nation depends on us, what RBG’s passing means for women, and what we can do to make sure that every vote is counted. 


Asheville nurses union vote unprecedented in NC

Carolina Public Press by Kate Martin 

In what the union hailed as a “landslide vote,” nurses at Mission Hospital in Asheville voted this week to approve a union — the first in North Carolina to do so and the largest hospital union win in the South since 1975.

National Nurses United, the labor group that now represents about 1,800 nurses at two addresses in Asheville, said in a statement Thursday morning it believes this is “the largest union election win in the South in a dozen years” for a union of any type.  CLICK TO CONTINUE


National Hispanic Heritage Month, September 15 – October 15,2020

About Catherine | U.S. Senator Catherine Cortez Masto of Nevada

On Tuesday, the National Hispanic Heritage Month began in the US. The annual event, which honours the history, culture and contributions of American citizens whose ancestors hailed from Spain, Mexico, the Caribbean and Central and South America, is marked every year from September 15 to October 15.


IDEA OF THE DAY: Libraries for democracy

The sociologist Eric Klinenberg published a book in 2018 called “Palaces for the People,” about the importance of shared public spaces in American life. Libraries, child care centers, churches and parks had all been crucial to the country’s historical success, he wrote, and he argued that they remained crucial to helping the country function better and overcome its deep divisions today.


The OnBeing Project,“Your one wild and precious life”

As fall begins to drift in, I’m called back to these lines in Mary Oliver’s poem, “The Summer Day”:

“I don’t know exactly what a prayer is.
I do know how to pay attention, how to fall down
into the grass, how to kneel down in the grass,
how to be idle and blessed, how to stroll through the fields,
which is what I have been doing all day.
Tell me, what else should I have done?
Doesn’t everything die at last, and too soon?
Tell me, what is it you plan to do
with your one wild and precious life?”


How Queer Women Powered the Suffrage Movement

By  in the New York Times

For many suffragists, scholars have found, the freedom to choose whom and how they loved was tied deeply to the idea of voting rights.

In 1920, the suffragist Molly Dewson sat down to write a letter of congratulations to Maud Wood Park, who had just been chosen as the first president of the League of Women Voters, formed in anticipation of the passage of the 19th Amendment to help millions of women carry out their newfound right as voters.

“Partner and I have been bursting with pride and satisfaction,” she wrote. Dewson didn’t need to specify who “partner” was. Park already knew that Dewson was in a committed relationship with Polly Porter, whom she had met a decade earlier. The couple then settled down at a farm in Massachusetts (where they named their bulls after men they disliked).

this article was offered by Jennifer Langton

CLICK TO CONTINUE


ERA-NC Alliance releases 2020 Candidates Survey, urges voters to “Vote Equality”

Raleigh — The ERA-NC Alliance is commemorating the 100th anniversary of women’s suffrage on Wednesday, Aug. 26, with the release of its biennial North Carolina Candidates Survey, a comprehensive look at candidates for the North Carolina General Assembly, the U.S. House and U.S. Senate and their support — or lack of support — of the Equal Rights Amendment.


ELIJAH’S VIOLIN   A poem in memory of Elijah McClain, February 25, 1996 – August 24, 2019

This afternoon I’m taking a break from making lists of what I think needs to be done in order to fix what’s wrong with the world.

I wish Elijah were still alive, toting his violin to the animal shelter as he often did, to soothe the kittens—when he saw their fear, this was his simple, kind gesture.

Had Elijah been read to as a child, he likely knew the story of the Jewish fairy tale, about children who learned to overcome fear through the power of music?

He would have known of his namesake, the ancient prophet Elijah and his magical violin that had the power to calm, and to release the secret melodies of the heart.

Had he taken his violin with him that evening on his walk to the corner store, it might have saved his life. 

It might have signaled to those men who murdered him that he was not a rapist, marauder, or thief.

They might then, have taken a minute to understand that he had simply walked to the corner store to buy some iced tea.

 

Jean Cassidy,  August 6, 2020  Asheville, North Carolina   

(August 2020 is the 75th anniversary month of both Hiroshima and Nagasaki – We remember)


A NOTE FROM JUSTIN, Malaprop’s Senior Buyer and General Manager

The senseless death of George Floyd and so many others has saddened us at Malaprop’s. We are also saddened, angered, disgusted, and disappointed in the behavior of police and our government, both nationally and locally. We feel the sorrow created by our nation’s collective grief and the disappointment in the way local law enforcement and leadership have treated those in our community who wish to have their voices heard.


Teaching kids to read during the coronavirus pandemic: 5 questions answered

in THE CONVERSATION

Keisha McIntosh Allen and Kindel Turner Nash research how kids learn to read and prepare future teachers at the University of Maryland Baltimore County. They are also raising children of their own. Here, they answer five questions many families and teachers may have about what they are seeing with virtual learning for early childhood education.

1. How do most kids learn to read?

Nash: Long before they enter kindergarten, most kids can “read” the words they encounter in their favorite books or around their home, on street signs and anywhere else they go.

Allen: Establishing routines that involve reading can help, such as reading them books – whether they are printed on paper or accessed through digital devices – and letting them watch others read. For example, my 1-year-old pretends that she can read because she often sees her 6-year-old brother reading.  CLICK TO CONTINUE


IN MEMORY of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg (1933-2020) from the American Civil Liberties Union and Planned Parenthood

Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the Supreme Court justice who first rose to national prominence as an ACLU lawyer fighting for equal rights for women, has died at 87 years old.
 
She began Harvard Law School as a young mother and one of only nine women in her class, and became the architect of a legal strategy to eradicate gender discrimination in the United States. She modeled her approach after that of Thurgood Marshall on race discrimination, planning for a series of cases at the Supreme Court, each precedent paving the way for the next that would further expand rights and protections. In 1993, she joined the court as an associate justice, and over the decades became a cultural icon beloved for her vision and passion in defending the rights of women.


SHE THE PEOPLE – Creating a Politics We Have Not Seen

We believe in a politics grounded in love, justice, and belonging. Our aim is to inspire the hearts and minds of everyday people, and turn non-voters into voters. We invite women of color to come together in person and online to tell our stories, host our people, and build community. Our network will continue to grow and live well beyond any one election and ensure that women of color will never be taken for granted again in elections.


AMICI MUSIC PRESENTS- Three different Jewish-inspired programs in September Mozart Zoom course in Sept.; Beethoven Zoom in October

Dear AmiciMusic friends,
Hope you can join us next week for a couple of different Jewish-themed concerts to celebrate the high holidays.  The third Jewish program will be coming up on September 20 (not Sept. 19 as written in last e-blast) and I will send out a link to that one soon.

s'lichot

First up on Wednesday, September 9 at 7:30pm is “JEWISH JOYS and SORROWS,” which is hosted by Baltimore’s Beth El Congregation as part of their First Wednesday series.  Dr. Eyal Bor, clarinet, will join Emmanuel Borowsky, violin; Darragh Fitzgerald, violin; Radhames Santos, viola; Frances Borowsky, cello; and Daniel Weiser, piano on an exciting program featuring music by Bloch, Achron, Kogan, Krein, and Prokofiev.  That program will go live on September 9 at 7:30 on the Beth El Facebook page at:  facebook.com/bethelbalto


Practices You/We Have Found Helpful These Past Few Months

The Fetzer Institute

In June we invited people to answer, What practice have you found particularly helpful during these past months? We received so many thoughtful and helpful replies and have been appreciating the peace that simply reading them brings. Together, the selections below represent many traditions, practices, and voices that will be helpful to our planning a coming year of monthly practices. Thank you!


REPRISE from 2017: So, What Do We Do? We Keep on RESISTING!

By Jane Edwards-Spence (SheVille’s personal political analyst…aren’t we lucky?)

Treason against the United States is defined in Article III of the Constitution as “levying war against [the United States], or in adhering to their enemies, giving them aid and comfort.” Cleaving to, or joining an enemy, as President Donald J. Trump did today, and in the past, is treason. Pure and simple.


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