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Women's Lives & Education

Why study women, minorities, or other controversial subjects at all? The answer is: a good liberal education (liberal as in “freedom”) teaches people to think both “inside the box” and “outside the box”.  Gender studies programs can encourage students to creatively examine their surroundings and learn to identify both the empowering and dis-empowering properties of words and deeds and to consider the relationship of race, gender, class and ethnicity as well as the manifestation and effects of gender bias in society.   Your suggestions and submissions are welcomed.
Research on Women and Education     Women’s Media Center     OnTrack Women’s Financial Empowerment Center     The Community Foundation of WNC – Women for Women grants     Western Women’s Business Center     Womansong of Asheville Women’s Chorus & New Start Program

Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at UNC Asheville

The Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at UNC Asheville (formerly the North Carolina Center for Creative Retirement) is an award-winning, internationally-acclaimed learning community dedicated to promoting lifelong learning, leadership, community service, and research. We opened our doors in 1988 as a department of the University of North Carolina at Asheville. Our goal is to enable our members to “thrive” in life’s second half.

OLLI at UNC Asheville(OLLI) embraces an unusually comprehensive array of programs in the arts and humanities, the natural world, civic engagement, wellness, life transition and retirement relocation planning, intergenerational co-learning, and research on trends in the reinvention of

OSHER Courses and Offerings


MAKERS.com Women Who Make America

Women Who Make America

 

 

 

MAKERS.com is a dynamic digital platform showcasing thousands of compelling stories – both known and unknown – from trailblazing women of today and tomorrow. This historic video initiative was founded by Dyllan McGee and developed by AOL and PBS. Executive Producers are Dyllan McGee, Betsy West, and Peter Kunhardt.

Browse videos of individuals

MAKERS: Women Who Make America is an ongoing initiative that aims to be the largest and most dynamic collection of women’s stories ever assembled. Selections of MAKERS are made twice a year by our filmmaking team using guidelines set by our board of advisors.This process ensures that the make-up of the library of stories includes women from all walks of life with diverse experiences and perspectives.  Watch the video

 

Women in the ‘Groundbreakers’ category were chosen by the production team based on criteria defined by a team of advisors and include women who are firsts in their fields, visionary role models or frontline activists who sparked, and some who opposed, change for women.

 

MAKERS: Women Who Make America is made possible by Simple® Facial Skincare, a Unilever brand, AOL and The Charles H. Revson Foundation. Additional funding for PBS.org/makers and MAKERS.com is provided by NoVo Foundation, Ford Foundation, John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, Carnegie Corporation of New York, The Rice Family Foundation, and The Rockefeller Foundation and others.


Women’s Media Center Congratula​tes Gloria Steinem on Presidenti​al Medal of Freedom

The Women’s Media Center proudly congratulates co-founder Gloria Steinem on being named recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom — the nation’s highest civilian honor.

In its announcement, the White House noted that Steinem is “a leader in the women’s liberation movement, co-founded Ms. magazine, and helped launch a wide variety of groups and publications dedicated to advancing civil rights.  Ms. Steinem has received dozens of awards over the course of her career, and remains an active voice for women’s rights.”


WHO Releases Global Report on Health Effects of Violence Against Women

The World Health Organization has released a new report, “Global and regional estimates of violence against women: prevalence and health effects of intimate partner violence and non-partner sexual violence,” [PDF] that attempts to quantify how many women around the world are exposed to physical and sexual violence at some point in their lives, and describes many of the associated poor health outcomes.

The findings are probably not surprising, but they are still disturbing.

WHO reports that 35 percent of women worldwide — more than 1 in 3 — have been physically and/or sexually abused. These figures do not include emotional/psychological abuse.  Continue Reading

 


Women’s History: The New York Times Reviews “Our Bodies, Ourselves”

Women’s History: The New York Times Reviews “Our Bodies, Ourselves”

 

Forty years ago today, The New York Times reviewed “Our Bodies, Ourselves” under the headline “Thinking About the Thinkable.”

 

It’s fascinating to see how the book was received in the mainstream press — and, in this case, how one of the most prominent book reviewers of the late 20th century, Christopher Lehmann-Haupt, approached the text.  Click here to read the entire article

 

 


Women In Combat

Women In Combat

 

Cheryl is a retired Air Force officer, living and writing in Asheville, NC. Her book, In Formation: What the Air Force Taught Me about Holding On and Manning Up is awaiting publication. You can read more of her work at www.cheryldietrich.net.

Last week, the Pentagon announced plans to open combat positions to women. This seems an appropriate time to give you my take on the subject, as written in my book, In Formation. Part of this post was published in the anthology Birthed from Scorched Hearts: Women Respond to War (compiled and edited by MariJo Moore, Fulcrum Publishing, 2008). Click here to read the entire blog entry


“Our Bodies, Ourselves” Part of Library of Congress’s “Books that Shaped America” Exhibit

“Our Bodies, Ourselves” Part of Library of Congress’s “Books that Shaped America” Exhibit

The original edition of “Our Bodies, Ourselves” has been named one of the Library of Congress’s “Books that Shaped America,” a list of important works “intended to spark a national conversation on books written by Americans that have influenced our lives.” click here to read more


WMC Feature: Misogynistic Ads and the Oxygen of Publicity

Retro-sexist advertising may be presented as ironic, but it features the same, familiar images feminists rallied against decades ago, argues the author. What to do?

Compare two advertisements—both use a picture of a young, attractive, white woman to sell their product. Both women look sweetly perplexed and nervous. One, for the Mini Automatic, is taglined “For Simple Driving” and shows the model clutching a steering wheel and biting her lip, daunted at the task of driving a car. The other, for a Samsung camera, is taglined “Too Smart For Amy” with its model holding up the product and pouting adorably, eyes wide with confusion to show she is completely flummoxed by this complex piece of technology. Can you guess which one was made in 1970 and which one was released in 2012? Me neither.  Click here to read the entire article


Join Me on the Bridge! International Women’s Day…all year long

Rwanda and Congo are two neighbouring countries that have been torn apart by the worst atrocities of war that the world has seen in recent years. The rape and torture of women as a weapon of war is commonplace.The women from the opposing sides of war in these communities came together to say No to war and Yes to peace, and to show how they could build the bridges of peace for the future. To show their support, women have stood with them on hundreds of bridges across the world from Sydney to Paris, and Accra to Ontario.  Click here “to build bridges of peace and hope for the future” If not this year what about next year?  Write SheVille if you are interested!    info@sheville.org




Prasad for Women: Talks for Fifth World Women

WELCOME FIFTH WORLD WOMEN. It is good to find you here. This is our time, our great joy, our canvas, our challenge, our sacred work, and our sacred trust. We are born for these times. What we each are, the world needs, every last woman of us. Every good impulse we have, every calling, instinct, stirring, essence, skill, ability, intuition, guidance, and dose of common sense, from the biggest big to the smallest small … all of this adds to the wealth and well-being of this world.


Dr. Maya Angelou Shares Wisdom and Inspiration in an Interview with Women For One

In an interview with Women For One, celebrated author and poet, Dr. Maya Angelou speaks about peace and authenticity.

One of the most incredibly inspiring and powerful women in history, celebrated author and poet Dr. Maya Angelou spoke with Women For One about what it means to be truly authentic. Dr. Angelou was a primary inspiration for the creation of Women For One; her stories and vision encourage others to share their stories with each other in the Women For One community. Just as in her own writing, Angelou hopes other women will also connect with readers in an authentic and human way. The trick, she notes, is to tell stories in the most truthful way possible.

Angelou started her artistic career at a young age and in 1969, her work “I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings”, earned her a reputation as a new kind of autobiographer. She was one of the first African-American women who could write about her life “from the inside” without apology. Her bravery in writing about her life makes her an inspiring example of the authenticity found in storytelling. Angelou has touched audiences worldwide and earned her several awards for her work including a Pulitzer, and is the second poet in history to be invited to compose a piece of work for a presidential inauguration. In addition, she has played many roles – mother, celebrated poet, memoirist and novelist, dramatist, actress, historian, filmmaker, civil rights activist, and noted professor with over thirty honorary degrees. She is currently the Reynolds Professor of American Studies at Wake Forest University.

In the interview, Angelou says that it’s up to women to work together to change the world around them, and bring peace both to themselves and their communities. She cites negativity as vulgarity, and explains how that negativity keeps women from truly being authentic. Her exemplary kindness and authentic truth-telling are prime examples of the change Women For One hopes to inspire in their community.


Fear of Jane Austen

When the Bank of England announced last month its intention to portray Jane Austen on its ten-pound note, it seemed the most uncontroversial of choices. Who better than Austen to stand as a representative of female accomplishment? Many of the female historical figures that might have been chosen were shocking in their time: consider Mary Wollstonecraft and Florence Nightingale. And most still have an air of scandal about them, their subsequent canonization notwithstanding. Continue reading


Women’s Lives: Join Us on Women’s Advocacy Day April 9

Join Us on Women’s Advocacy Day

Are you ready? Come to Raleigh on Tuesday, April 9!

  • Hear Kim Gandy talk about her history of working for women, especially in the area of Violence Against Women
  • Hear representatives from NCWU member organizations talk about other issues of concern.
  • Join with others from your district and across the state to speak to your legislators about the issues of most concern to you
  • If you are free Monday evening, join us for a special reception in honor of Ms. Gandy and focused on the issues of violence against women

Registration is open! Please let us know you are coming!

Women’s Advocacy Day and the reception are free and open to the public, though space is limited at the reception. Donors to NCWU will be recognized at the reception with special recognition for those contributing at least $75 (bronze), $150 (silver) and $250 (gold). Please consider a donation to help our efforts.

MAKERS; Women Who Make America

This video tells the remarkable story of the most sweeping social revolution in American history, as women have asserted their rights to a full and fair share of political power, economic opportunity, and personal autonomy.  It’s a revolution that has unfolded in public and private, in courts and Congress, in the boardroom and the bedroom, changing not only what the world expects from women, but what women expect from themselves. Click here for the video

Gloria Steinem, longtime feminist and founder of Ms. Magazine, talks with PBS NewsHour Senior Correspondent Judy Woodruff on Tuesday, February 26, 2013.

They’ll discuss the women’s movement and the renewed debate over whether women can “have it all.” They’ll explore how far women have come and the challenges ahead. To what extent are women responsible for their own success? What role do governments and employers play? Check your local listings for PBS NewsHour.

Steinem is featured in the PBS documentary, “MAKERS: Women Who Make America.” It examines the sweeping social revolution, as women have taken larger and more prominent roles in political, economic and social arenas. The documentary tells the stories of trailblazing women whose work has altered nearly every aspect of American culture. “MAKERS” airs on February 26th at 8:00 P.M. Eastern time on PBS.

Anne D. Bell
Public Relations Manager
PBS NEWSHOUR
2700 South Quincy St.; Suite 250
Arlington, VA 22206
Office – (703) 998-2175
@AnneBell

 


She’s Beautiful When She’s Angry: New Documentary on History of the Women’s Movement

She’s Beautiful When She’s Angry: New Documentary on History of the Women’s Movement

A new documentary, “She’s Beautiful When She’s Angry,” chronicles the history of the women’s movement from 1966 to 1972, including the genesis of Our Bodies Ourselves, the founding of NOW, and other historical milestones.

The filmmakers are running a Kickstarter campaign to raise funds to finish the project, and have a little more than a month to go. Check it out to learn more about the project and consider supporting their efforts. Click here for the entire article


The Listening Project – National and International

A Listening Project (LP) is a comprehensive process that includes deep listening interviews and community organizing that can result in cooperative community education and action on a wide range of issues and concerns. LPs are especially useful in communities where conflict, divisions or disempowerment weakens efforts for positive change. They can help organizations successfully address injustice, conflict, community development, health, environmental and others concerns.

What It Does

  • Identifies problems and issues that people care about.

  • Includes often unheard or unheeded voices.

  • Fosters emergence and development of new community leaders.

  • Generates creative solutions for community needs and problems.

  • Disseminates issue-related information and determines needs for additional information.

  • Encourages personal growth as all involved consider new viewpoints and information.

  • Forms uncommon coalitions and alliances through which diverse viewpoints can resolve – rather than clash over – difficult issues.

  • Promotes insight, empathy, and understanding among people with conflicting views.

  • Creates long-term capacity for grassroots community building.  Click here to read more


Sex, lies and media: New wave of activists challenge notions of beauty

Here’s the fantasy: A half-naked woman lies across a couch, lips pouty and cleavage prominent as her sultry gaze implores you to buy this bottle of perfume.The reality: Women make up 51% of the United States yet only 17% of seats in the House of Representatives. They’re 3% of Fortune 500 CEOs and 7% of directors in the top 250 grossing films.  Click here to read the entire article


What Did Egyptian Women Gain from Arab Spring Uprising?

Sherine Hafez and Jessica Winegar examine the role and future of Egyptian women in the Arab Spring Uprising in this quarter’s American Ethnologist by authoring personal accounts of women during the revolution. From the thicket of peaceful protest in Tahrir Square to tending to the domestic duties during such an uncertain time, many obstacles have challenged the role of women in politics.

Jessica Winegar, sociocultural anthropologist and Assistant Professor at Northwestern University, examines the responsibilities of women during the uprising. Professor Winegar was in Cairo during the uprising, however, like many women, she could not attend the protest due to family obligations in the home. “I call attention to the way that revolution is experienced and undertaken in domestic spaces, through different forms of affect, in ways deeply inflected by gender and class,” says Winegar in her article The Privilege of Revolution: Gender, class, space, and affect in Egypt.

Sherine Hafez, ethnographer and Assistant Professor at the University of California Riverside, takes an in-depth look at the role of women after the uprising to surprisingly find this role remains the same, in her article No Longer a Bargain: Women, Masculinity, and the Egyptian Uprising. She notes that “what the events of this uprising have revealed is that notions of masculinity undermined by a repressive regime have observably shifted the terms of the patriarchal bargain.”


American Ethnologist
, a quarterly journal produced by the American Ethnological Society (AES), in its February 2012 issue features these articles on the Arab Spring uprising in Egypt. The nine authors are anthropologists with a wide range of specialties who have years of research experience in Egypt. The online and print editions are currently available. Articles and abstracts are available at www.americanethnologist.org

This journal is edited by Angelique Haugerud of Rutgers University and its content deals with all facets of ethnology in the broadest sense of the term. Articles creatively demonstrate the connections between ethnographic specificity and theoretical originality, as well as the ongoing relevance of the ethnographic imagination to the contemporary world.

The American Ethnological Society, founded in 1842, sponsors the journal American Ethnologist. AES is a section of the American Anthropological Association.

-American Anthropological Association-
Founded in 1902, the American Anthropological Association is the world’s largest professional organization of anthropologists and others interested in anthropology, with an average annual membership of more than 10,000. The Arlington, VA – based association represents all specialties within anthropology – cultural anthropology, biological (or physical) anthropology, archaeology, linguistics and applied anthropology.

Media Resources:
American Ethnologist:  www.americanethnologist.org

AE Online Issue:  http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/amet.2012.39.issue-1/issuetoc

Sherine Hafez:  http://bit.ly/z30gq3

Jessica Winegar:  http://bit.ly/AiiQ2E

Angelique Haugerud, Editor, American Ethnologist:  http://bit.ly/wEByYO

American Ethnologist Society:  www.aesonline.org

Contact:
Joslyn Osten, Marketing and Public Relations Manager
American Anthropological Association, 2200 Wilson Blvd., Suite 600, Arlington, VA 22201-3357
(T) 703/528-1902 x1171, (F) 703/528-3546, josten@aaanet.org


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