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Women's Lives & Education

Why study women, minorities, or other controversial subjects at all? The answer is: a good liberal education (liberal as in “freedom”) teaches people to think both “inside the box” and “outside the box”.  Gender studies programs can encourage students to creatively examine their surroundings and learn to identify both the empowering and dis-empowering properties of words and deeds and to consider the relationship of race, gender, class and ethnicity as well as the manifestation and effects of gender bias in society.   Your suggestions and submissions are welcomed.
Research on Women and Education     Women’s Media Center     OnTrack Women’s Financial Empowerment Center     The Community Foundation of WNC – Women for Women grants     Western Women’s Business Center     Womansong of Asheville Women’s Chorus & New Start Program

WOMEN, PEACE & SECURITY : Women are critical to achieving sustainable peace

Our goal is to build the evidence-based case for a focus on women, peace, and security.

Georgetown University’s Institute for Women, Peace & Security seeks to promote a more stable, peaceful, and just world by focusing on the important role women play in preventing conflict and building peace, growing economies, and addressing global threats like climate change and violent extremism. We engage in rigorous research, host global convenings, advance strategic partnerships, and nurture the next generation of leaders. Housed within the Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown, the Institute is headed by the former U.S. Ambassador for Global Women’s Issues, Melanne Verveer.


The Feminist History of ‘Take Me Out to the Ball Game’

Described by Hall of Fame broadcaster Harry Caray as “a song that reflects the charisma of baseball,” ”Take Me Out to the Ball Game,” written in 1908 by lyricist Jack Norworth and composer Albert von Tilzer, is inextricably linked to America’s national pastime. But while most Americans can sing along as baseball fans “root, root, root for the home team,” few know the song’s feminist history.


The woman behind Elizabeth Warren’s blueprint for the presidency

Rebecca Brenner is a PhD candidate in history at American University in Washington, DC.

Last week, Sen. Elizabeth Warren delivered a speech before her largest crowd yet, in Washington Square Park in New York. She invoked the memory of former labor secretary Frances Perkins, a witness to the 1911 Triangle Shirtwaist fire, which took place adjacent to the site of Warren’s speech to argue that “big structural change” is possible through a combination of relentless activism outside of government and a leader like Perkins or Warren herself on the inside.

Warren, a Democratic presidential candidate, isn’t the first politician to use public memory of a historic figure to convey her message, but Perkins, who rarely receives national attention today, is a unique choice. Although Warren’s speech marks a key point in remembering Perkins, it also offers insight into the candidate’s hopes for a potential presidency. She depicted Perkins as a trailblazing female politician who fused progressive idealism and pragmatic policy change, exactly what she hopes to be.

CLICK TO CONTINUE


Sonia Johnson, Equal Rights Activist in 1936

Sonia Ann Johnson, née Harris, was born a fifth-generation Mormon in Malad, Idaho. She graduated from Utah State University, pursuing her M.A. and Ed.D. from Rutgers University after marrying, and through many moves and pregnancies. She taught English at American and foreign universities, working part-time as a teacher while accompanying her husband on overseas jobs. The family returned to the U.S. in 1976, buying a house in Virginia, one of the states that had not ratified the Equal Rights Amendment. Johnson became such an ardent supporter of the ERA that she was excommunicated by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in 1979. She exposed the role of the wealthy Mormon Church in sabotaging passage of the ERA. She went on a 37-day hunger strike in the Illinois statehouse in 1982 during the last days of the ERA countdown to symbolize how “women hunger for justice.”


THE MUSIC TRAILS of The Blue Ridge Mountains of Western North Carolina

The Blue Ridge Music Trails are nestled within the North Carolina mountains and foothills, a region known for its spectacular beauty, moderate climate, Cherokee heritage, handmade crafts, small family farms, and, of course, its rich musical traditions. The geographic footprint of the Blue Ridge Music Trails consists of twenty-nine counties in the western third of the state.


Dame Jane Goodall awarded 2019 Prize for Outstanding Environmental Peace

RTL Update 2019

The 2019 edition of the Luxembourg Peace Prize, as organised by the Schengen Peace Forum and the World Peace Forum, was held on 14 June 2019.

RTL Today reported on the 8th edition of the Luxembourg Peace Prize in our RTL Reports video, published on Sunday. Our video report features an excerpt of Dame Jane Goodall’s video acceptance speech. The 85-year-old British primatologist and anthropologist was awarded the 2019 Prize for Outstanding Environmental Peace. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE


Dear daughter: Be loud, take up space—your voice matters

by

When I was in the fifth grade I made it to the finals in both a public speaking contest and spelling bee—both were in front of the entire school. My tiny body strutted to the podium. The ocean of bobbing, grinning parents and siblings didn’t scare me. No nerves entered my body, instead, self-reliance fired into the audience. I puffed my chest out. My voice didn’t rattle—it rang clear.

I didn’t win first place in either contest. But I remember the poise and self-assurance I felt in front of all those people. At age 11, my confidence climbed.

But it only soared a little longer. 

Click here to continue


Women At Ernst & Young Instructed On How To Dress, Act Nicely Around Men

ISABELLA CARAPELLA / HUFFPOST

When women speak, they shouldn’t be shrill. Clothing must flatter, but short skirts are a no-no. After all, “sexuality scrambles the mind.” Women should look healthy and fit, with a “good haircut” and “manicured nails.” 

These were just a few pieces of advice that around 30 female executives at Ernst & Young received at a training held in the accounting giant’s gleaming new office in Hoboken, New Jersey, in June 2018.  CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

 


OURS IS NO BEDTIME STORY – Pauli Murray’s Dark Testament reintroduces a major Black poet.

BY ED PAVLIĆ  in Poetry Foundation

“Please don’t refer to me as ‘Mother Murray,’” Pauli Murray chided a reporter from the New Haven Register in 1977. The newspaper was running a story about the then-67-year-old Murray becoming the first African-American woman ordained an Episcopal priest. The achievement was another first in what had been a trailblazing life marked by both triumph and strife.


THE MYTH OF SOULMATES: Advice from someone who’s been married for 10 years

by Jessica Valenti in GEN

Ten years ago today, I got married in an upstate New York ceremony that I planned down to the dinner napkin placement and band’s song order. I wore gray instead of white — I had just written a book decrying America’s obsession with virginity — and had spent the two previous nights meticulously punching out leaf-shaped pieces of paper with my then fiancé, pasting them on seating cards. It was a lovely and love-filled day.


Pregnancy and Postpartum Depression

Offered by Tracey Fowler at Maryville University, St. Louis, Missouri

About Postpartum Depression

Having a baby is typically described as a time of joy. A time to celebrate the new little life that has been brought into this world. A time to be thankful for the family unit that has now been increased by one or more.

However, for some women, this life-altering event brings about feelings that aren’t quite as joyful, and begins a condition known as postpartum depression (PPD).


THE MATILDA EFFECT: the misappropriating of women’s scientific achievements

in Wikipedia

The Matilda effect is a bias against acknowledging the achievements of those women scientists whose work is attributed to their male colleagues. This effect was first described by suffragist and abolitionist Matilda Joslyn Gage (1826–98) in her essay, “Woman as Inventor” (first published as a tract in 1870 and in the North American Review in 1883). The term “Matilda effect” was coined in 1993 by science historian Margaret W. Rossiter.


The hidden story of two African American women looking out from the pages of a 19th-century book

by Kate Clarke Lemay, Smithsonian Institution and Martha S. Jones, Johns Hopkins University

We are two historians whose work focuses on American art and on how African Americans have shaped the story of American democracy. Our two subject areas converged recently when one of us had a question, and the other helped her research the answer.

Kate was in the midst of organizing the National Portrait Gallery’s exhibition, “Votes for Women: A Portrait of Persistence,” commemorating the more than 80-year movement for women to obtain the right to vote. This exhibition is part of the Smithsonian American Women’s History Initiative, Because of Her Story. While doing her research, Kate encountered a character in history whose story she didn’t know, but who she anticipated would be important to the history the museum wanted to tell.

Who was Mary E. Harper? That’s the question Kate set out to answer. CLICK TO CONTINUE

 


The Mental Load Struggle Is Real

by Anja Boynton in Medium

This morning, I woke up early for a work call. I walked out into my living room and was disappointed but unsurprised by what I found.

I made dinner last night. Baked lemon-herb chicken, garlic bread, mesclun salad with fig balsamic dressing, and grilled artichokes. It is my ambition to cook on most nights, but lately, that goal has felt out of reach, just another unchecked box on my ever-expanding to-do list.


Broaching the Subject of Beauty

A look at three paintings from the cusp of the 20th century that make a powerful argument for beauty.

When in 2014 the Getty Museum acquired Édouard Manet’s “Jeanne (Spring)” (1881), it commissioned a three-lecture series and invited the art historian Richard Brettell to be the first speaker. He, in turn, has now expanded his published version of those discussions to deal also with two other late 19th-century paintings in the Getty collection, Paul Gauguin’s still life “Arii matamoe (La fin royale)” (1892) and Paul Cézanne’s “Young Italian Woman at a Table” (1895-1900).

As Brettell notes at the start of his book, On Modern Beauty: Three Paintings by Manet, Gauguin and Cézanne, both ‘modern’ and ‘beauty’ have become highly problematic concepts, in part because of the legitimate concerns of feminists and scholars dealing with gender and colonialism.  Click here to continue


The Problem with The Rosa Parks Barbie

by Andrea S. Johnson in History News Network

This week Mattel proudly announced two new dolls in The Inspiring Women Series of Barbies.  Civil rights activist Rosa Parks and astronaut Sally Ride join a line that has previously featured aviator Amelia Earhart, artist Frida Kahlo, and NASA mathematician Katherine Johnson. The description of Rosa Parks though is a bit lacking as it claims that she “led an ordinary life as a seamstress until an extraordinary moment on December 1, 1955.” She is described as having a “quiet strength” that “played a notable role in the civil rights movement…” Click here to continue


The Cultural History of Woodstock and a Message of Hope

Harlan Lebo is a cultural historian at the Center for the Digital Future at the USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism. He is the author of 100 Days: How Four Events in 1969 Shaped AmericaHis previous books include Citizen Kane, Casablanca: Behind the Scenes, The Godfather Legacy, and Citizen Kane: A Filmmakers Journey. He resides in Los Angeles.


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