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Women's Lives & Education

Why study women, minorities, or other controversial subjects at all? The answer is: a good liberal education (liberal as in “freedom”) teaches people to think both “inside the box” and “outside the box”.  Gender studies programs can encourage students to creatively examine their surroundings and learn to identify both the empowering and dis-empowering properties of words and deeds and to consider the relationship of race, gender, class and ethnicity as well as the manifestation and effects of gender bias in society.   Your suggestions and submissions are welcomed.
Research on Women and Education     Women’s Media Center     OnTrack Women’s Financial Empowerment Center     The Community Foundation of WNC – Women for Women grants     Western Women’s Business Center     Womansong of Asheville Women’s Chorus & New Start Program

The Fetzer Institute – Our Mission: Helping build the spiritual foundation for a loving world

At the Fetzer Institute, we believe in the possibility of a loving world: a world where we understand we are all part of one human family and know our lives have purpose. In the world we seek, everyone is committed to courageous compassion and bold love—powerful forces for good in the face of fear, anger, division, and despair.


Women in Congress get higher scores on environmental issues

By Anika Lanser

A new report from Rachel’s Network, a nonprofit that focuses on women and environmental issues, finds that women legislators are far more likely to vote in favor of legislation that protects or preserves the environment. The research, based on an analysis of the League of Conservation Voters scorecards for members of the U.S. House and Senate from 2006–2018, found that the average LCV score for women senators was 71 compared to 46 for their male counterparts. In the House, women on average scored 70 while men scored 43.


EQUAL MEANS EQUAL launches Woman’s Journal 2.0

On the eve of the 100th anniversary of women’s suffrage in America, EQUAL MEANS EQUAL is launching Woman’s Journal 2.0. The original Woman’s Journal began as a weekly newspaper in 1870, and was instrumental in mobilizing people across the country to support the 19th Amendment. We hope this new iteration will inspire people nationwide to support the Equal Rights Amendment.


‘Toni Morrison: The Pieces I Am’ review: Irresistible voice of beloved writer shines through

By Moira Macdonald at Seattle Times

The Nobel Prize-winning writer Toni Morrison has a voice like a warm blanket, and it spreads across the documentary “Toni Morrison: The Pieces I Am” irresistibly; when it’s over, you feel like a beloved friend has left the room. In Timothy Greenfield-Sanders’ film, Morrison is seated squarely facing the camera and speaking to it, while the other voices in the film – friends, fellow writers, critics, academics – are shot at a more traditional angle. The result is an intimate directness, a sense of a genuine conversation.


LOSING MY RELIGION FOR EQUALITY

By Jimmy Carter 

Women and girls have been discriminated against for too long in a twisted interpretation of the word of God.

I HAVE been a practicing Christian all my life and a deacon and Bible teacher for many years. My faith is a source of strength and comfort to me, as religious beliefs are to hundreds of millions of people around the world. So my decision to sever my ties with the Southern Baptist Convention, after six decades, was painful and difficult. It was, however, an unavoidable decision when the convention’s leaders, quoting a few carefully selected Bible verses and claiming that Eve was created second to Adam and was responsible for original sin, ordained that women must be “subservient” to their husbands and prohibited from serving as deacons, pastors or chaplains in the military service.


ASHEVILLE GREENWORKS & RECYCLING INFO

Recycling & Waste Reduction

Waste reduction is a major component of our work at Asheville GreenWorks. Since 1973, our staff and volunteers have worked to educate and reduce our dependance on one-use, so called “throw-away” items that simply fill up our landfills. Through recycling and compost education, we will reduce our need for landfills and through these innovations support infrastructure for future green industries. 


MARGARET ATWOOD says it’s “a form of slavery to force women to have children they can’t afford”

Margaret Atwood has an eerie prediction about the outcome of abortion restrictions, one that bears an uncanny resemblance to the dystopian future depicted in her hyper-relevant novel, The Handmaid’s Tale.

Speaking at New York City’s Book Con on Saturday, Atwood argued that when states obligate women into childbearing, they institute “a form of slavery,” Insider reported. State-mandated reproduction has two outcomes, she said: That women die, and that orphanages fill up.


LIBRARY OF CONGRESS NEEDS HELP Transcribing Suffragist Documents

from BOOK RIOT

Fast typists, adept transcribers, and fearsome keyboard clackers, lend me your ears! The Library of Congress needs your help. The Smithsonian reported on July 30 that the Library seeks help transcribing more than 16,000 pages of suffragist diaries, letters, speeches, and other documents. All are available on the library’s crowdsourcing program, By the People, and they’re hoping volunteers will help in the effort to bring more suffragist stories to light.


Up Close & Personal With Four Appalachia Now! Artists

Shauna Caldwell, Appalachian State University graduate student and Appalachia Now! project intern, recently sat down with four artists whose work will be shown in the Museum’s opening exhibition Appalachia Now! An Interdisciplinary Survey of Contemporary Art in Southern Appalachia. Click the names to read more about Clarissa SlighDanielle BurkeEleanor Annand, and Molly Sawyer!


JANUARY 1, 1925: CECILIA PAYNE-GAPOSCHKIN and the Day the Universe Changed

By Richard Williams in APS News

Cecilia Payne made a long and lonely journey from her childhood in England to prominence in a scientific community that begrudged a place to women. She began her scientific career with a scholarship to Cambridge University, where she took the course in physics. After meeting Harlow Shapley from Harvard, she moved to Massachusetts and pursued a doctoral degree in astronomy. Her 1925 thesis, entitled Stellar Atmospheres, was famously described by astronomer Otto Struve as “the most brilliant PhD thesis ever written in astronomy.” By calculating the abundance of chemical elements from stellar spectra, her work began a revolution in astrophysics.


JANE ADDAMS AND LILLIAN WALD: Imagining Social Justice from the Outside

Anyone who has taken a United States history course in high school knows the story of Jane Addams and Chicago’s Hull House, the first Settlement House in America and arguably the genesis of social work in the country. More advanced textbooks may even have discussed Lillian Wald, founder of New York’s Henry Street Settlement House, who was instrumental in introducing the concept of “public health” – and the important epidemiological axiom that physical well being is inseparable from economic and living conditions. 

What no one learned in high school, or later, was that Addams and Wald were women who loved other women and that these relationships – as well as the female friendship networks in which they were involved – were profoundly instrumental to their vision of social justice that changed America.  CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE


NO UNION MORE PROFOUND – a celebration of human rights

Letters from Little Rock

By   |  July 2, 2015  in Oxford American

The poets Nickole Brown and Jessica Jacobs were married in California in October of 2013. Following the Supreme Court’s marriage equality ruling, they exchanged a series of letters from their home in Little RockNickole begins:

Some images I want to bless in clear water and hold up to the light. Like my sister, nearly six years ago now, sitting up during a contraction to touch the crown of her son not yet born. Or my peonies in Kentucky—one June, I cut every single stalk and brought the armload inside, blooms big as grapefruit, blasting open with black ants. 


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