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Visual Art & Film

Over the decades Asheville and Western North Carolina have become a haven for the visual artist whether creating glassware, painting, sculpture, metalwork, fiber work or American craft,etc. So, the talent in our region is boundless and the galleries overflow with amazingly beautiful art.
Arts and Crafts Galore!     Asheville Area Arts     River Arts District      Rapid River Review: Arts & Culture Magazine   Asheville & WNC Studio Tours     Weaverville Art Safari  

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EIGHT MUST-SEE FILMS DIRECTED BY BLACK WOMEN – The Representation Project BLOG

While women make up only 13 percent of directors in film, the number of Black women behind the camera is even smaller. Though the media has been stingy with granting Black women opportunities to helm projects, there have still been a number of women who have made a seat at the table and paved a way for the women behind them.


FEMALE ARTISTS Made Little Progress in Museums Since 2008, Survey Finds

By Julia Jacobs in The New York Times

Over the past decade, there has been a sense in the art world that gender equity was on the horizon: Emerging female artists were landing high-profile solo shows, museums were staging women-themed exhibitions, grants were being awarded to boost female artists, and long-neglected artists were being given overdue recognition.


WNC LEGACY: FINE ART &CRAFT- On a Personal Note: John Cram

By Jim Murphy in The Laurel of Asheville 2016

In the early 1970s, John Cram visited Asheville and says, “I fell in love with the place.” He moved here and found that Asheville was sitting squarely between the mountains and the doldrums. Beyond the town’s natural attractions, there was not a lot to love. And there was not a lot of demand for a 25-year-old holding a communications degree with a concentration in film. (John calls it “a bachelor’s degree in nothing.”) But just beneath that liberal arts background lurked the soul of an entrepreneur.


The True Story Behind the Harriet Tubman Movie and the Reverse Underground Railroad

By Meilan Solly in Smithsonian.com

Harriet Tubman’s first act as a free woman was poignantly simple. As she later told biographer Sarah Bradford, after crossing the Pennsylvania state boundary line in September 1849, “I looked at my hands to see if I was the same person. There was such a glory over everything; the sun came like gold through the trees, and over the fields, and I felt like I was in Heaven.”


Broaching the Subject of Beauty

A look at three paintings from the cusp of the 20th century that make a powerful argument for beauty.

When in 2014 the Getty Museum acquired Édouard Manet’s “Jeanne (Spring)” (1881), it commissioned a three-lecture series and invited the art historian Richard Brettell to be the first speaker. He, in turn, has now expanded his published version of those discussions to deal also with two other late 19th-century paintings in the Getty collection, Paul Gauguin’s still life “Arii matamoe (La fin royale)” (1892) and Paul Cézanne’s “Young Italian Woman at a Table” (1895-1900).

As Brettell notes at the start of his book, On Modern Beauty: Three Paintings by Manet, Gauguin and Cézanne, both ‘modern’ and ‘beauty’ have become highly problematic concepts, in part because of the legitimate concerns of feminists and scholars dealing with gender and colonialism.  Click here to continue


WOMEN’S HISTORY MONTH AT UNC Asheville to Feature Documentary on Film-Making Pioneer Alice Guy-Blaché and Talks on the Southern Women’s Rights Movements

To mark Women’s History Month 2020, in March, UNC Asheville will present a documentary narrated by Jodie Foster about one of cinema’s pioneers, Alice Guy-Blaché, and a series of talks about suffrage and feminism in different times and places in the South. All Women’s History Month events are free and open to everyone.


THE ART WORLD NEEDS MORE WOMEN

By The Representation Project

Last year, the Baltimore Museum of Art made a major announcement that was met with both criticism and applause: they decided in 2020 they would only be purchasing art made by women. In an interview with AFP, Museum Director Christopher Bedford said that of the museum’s 95,000 works, only 4% were made by female artists. This inequality in artist representation spans beyond the Baltimore Museum of Art – it’s a nationwide norm. An article published by the New York Times revealed that between 2008 and 2018, only 11% of work acquired by America’s top art museums were created by women. To put these percentages into numbers, that’s only 29,247 pieces out of the 260,470 total acquired works. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE


Why Have There Been No Great Women Cinematographers (According to Hollywood)?

By Justine Smith in Hyperallergic

As the Cinémathèque Québécoise pays homage to some of the notable women who have stepped behind the camera and “painted with light,” critic Justine Smith considers why their work is often underrecognized.

In Claire Denis’s Beau Travail, soldiers train in the desert. The sky, bleached white, encases their moving bodies. The camera, intimate and up-close, is handheld.


THE MOST IMPORTANT BLACK WOMAN SCULPTOR of the 20th century deserves more recognition

Unfortunately, little of her work survives

By Keisha N. Blain in Timeline Medium

ugusta Savage started sculpting as a child in the 1900s using what she could get her hands on: the clay that was part of the natural landscape in her hometown of Green Cove Springs, Florida. Eventually her talents took her far from the clay pits of the South. She joined the burgeoning arts scene of the Harlem Renaissancewhen her talents led her to New York.


A Viral List of Hundreds of Opportunities for Artists, Compiled by One Person to Encourage Community

By Sarah Rose Sharp in Hyperallergic

Everest Pipkin has made public their “Big Artist Opportunities List” — a collection of over 400 opportunities for artists across the globe.

With the overwhelming reality that artists are expected to somehow maintain a practice, store and ship work, support their scene, self-promote, manage open accounts with galleries — all generally on spec, at least starting out — plus do whatever it takes to pay their bills, who has the time or bandwidth to keep track of opportunities to further one’s practice? 


Once Overlooked, Female Old Masters Take Center Stage

By Sotheby’s

n 1971, pioneering feminist art historian Linda Nochlin penned the now-iconic essay “Why Have There Been No Great Women Artists?” – a powerful critique on the ways in which women had been excluded from art history. Nearly 50 years later, the stories of the remarkable women who did break boundaries to achieve artistic acclaim are just beginning to be told. This January, Sotheby’s celebrates trailblazing female artists from the 16th through the 19th centuries with The Female Triumphant, a group of exceptional works of art that will be offered in our Masters Week sales. In spite of extraordinary obstacles, talented artists such as Elisabeth-Louise Vigée Le Brun, Fede GaliziaMichaelina Wautier and Elizabeth Gardner Bouguereau paved the way for future generations of artists everywhere. Below, four expert voices discuss how these artists changed painting forever.     Click to continue


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