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Visual Art & Film

Over the decades Asheville and Western North Carolina have become a haven for the visual artist whether creating glassware, painting, sculpture, metalwork, fiber work or American craft,etc. So, the talent in our region is boundless and the galleries overflow with amazingly beautiful art.
Arts and Crafts Galore!     Asheville Area Arts     River Arts District      Rapid River Review: Arts & Culture Magazine   Asheville & WNC Studio Tours     Weaverville Art Safari  

Augusta Savage

THE MOST IMPORTANT BLACK WOMAN SCULPTOR of the 20th century deserves more recognition

Unfortunately, little of her work survives

By Keisha N. Blain in Timeline Medium

ugusta Savage started sculpting as a child in the 1900s using what she could get her hands on: the clay that was part of the natural landscape in her hometown of Green Cove Springs, Florida. Eventually her talents took her far from the clay pits of the South. She joined the burgeoning arts scene of the Harlem Renaissancewhen her talents led her to New York.


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WNC LEGACY: FINE ART &CRAFT- On a Personal Note: John Cram

By Jim Murphy in The Laurel of Asheville 2016

In the early 1970s, John Cram visited Asheville and says, “I fell in love with the place.” He moved here and found that Asheville was sitting squarely between the mountains and the doldrums. Beyond the town’s natural attractions, there was not a lot to love. And there was not a lot of demand for a 25-year-old holding a communications degree with a concentration in film. (John calls it “a bachelor’s degree in nothing.”) But just beneath that liberal arts background lurked the soul of an entrepreneur.


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The True Story Behind the Harriet Tubman Movie and the Reverse Underground Railroad

By Meilan Solly in Smithsonian.com

Harriet Tubman’s first act as a free woman was poignantly simple. As she later told biographer Sarah Bradford, after crossing the Pennsylvania state boundary line in September 1849, “I looked at my hands to see if I was the same person. There was such a glory over everything; the sun came like gold through the trees, and over the fields, and I felt like I was in Heaven.”


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“Children need art and stories and poems and music as much as they need love and food and fresh air and play. “

Wise words from Philip Pullman, who received the Astrid Lindgren Memorial Award in 2005:

Children need art and stories and poems and music as much as they need love and food and fresh air and play. If you don’t give a child food, the damage quickly becomes visible. If you don’t let a child have fresh air and play, the damage is also visible, but not so quickly. If you don’t give a child love, the damage might not be seen for some years, but it’s permanent.


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CENTER FOR CRAFT – Keeping Asheville Creative Artspace Survey Findings Ripple out into Asheville’s Development Sector

Last year, Center for Craft and the Asheville Area Chamber of Commerce partnered with Artspace, a nonprofit real estate developer that focuses on affordable housing, studio, and performance space for artists, to conduct a community-wide survey to assess the needs of area creatives – from individuals to cultural organizations and related businesses.

The landmark survey, taken by 1,265 individuals and 170 organizations, documents the immediate need for affordable spaces for makers, designers, and performers in Asheville. The study found that a majority of artists (86%) and arts organizations (78%) would be interested in renting space in a multi-use arts facility in Asheville, North Carolina (see the full survey results here).  Click here to continue reading

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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Featured Book TRANSFORMING HATE: AN ARTIST’S BOOK by Clarissa T. Sligh

Transforming Hate is a project comprised of folded origami cranes, photographs, installations, artist books, other image-text narratives, and workshops with local community organizations. In this work, historical elements are used as a framing device to construct the evolution of our shared identity… Origami cranes were folded from pages of white supremacist books.


ASHEVILLE AREA ART Exhibitions and Events

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 Innovative programming utilizing an outstanding collection of American art of the 20th and 21st centuries has established the Asheville Art Museum as a leader in the arts for Western North Carolina and the Southeast. It is the only organization of its kind providing cultural and educational experiences for residents and visitors to the 24 county region.Established by artists and incorporated in 1948, the Asheville Art Museum is committed to being a vital force in community and individual development and to providing life-long opportunities for education and enrichment through the visual arts. Click here for our website


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Why Have There Been No Great Women Cinematographers (According to Hollywood)?

By Justine Smith in Hyperallergic

As the Cinémathèque Québécoise pays homage to some of the notable women who have stepped behind the camera and “painted with light,” critic Justine Smith considers why their work is often underrecognized.

In Claire Denis’s Beau Travail, soldiers train in the desert. The sky, bleached white, encases their moving bodies. The camera, intimate and up-close, is handheld.


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A Viral List of Hundreds of Opportunities for Artists, Compiled by One Person to Encourage Community

By Sarah Rose Sharp in Hyperallergic

Everest Pipkin has made public their “Big Artist Opportunities List” — a collection of over 400 opportunities for artists across the globe.

With the overwhelming reality that artists are expected to somehow maintain a practice, store and ship work, support their scene, self-promote, manage open accounts with galleries — all generally on spec, at least starting out — plus do whatever it takes to pay their bills, who has the time or bandwidth to keep track of opportunities to further one’s practice? 


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‘Toni Morrison: The Pieces I Am’ review: Irresistible voice of beloved writer shines through

By Moira Macdonald at Seattle Times

The Nobel Prize-winning writer Toni Morrison has a voice like a warm blanket, and it spreads across the documentary “Toni Morrison: The Pieces I Am” irresistibly; when it’s over, you feel like a beloved friend has left the room. In Timothy Greenfield-Sanders’ film, Morrison is seated squarely facing the camera and speaking to it, while the other voices in the film – friends, fellow writers, critics, academics – are shot at a more traditional angle. The result is an intimate directness, a sense of a genuine conversation.


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ASHEVILLE NEWS from Our City – Arts, Energy and Racial Equity

City issues call for artists for River Arts District public art project

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The City is continuing to implement the River Arts District (RAD) Public Art Plan.

The City of Asheville and the Public Art and Cultural Commission (PACC) seek qualified artists to submit Letters of Interest in becoming one of three artists asked to submit proposals for a project called Playful Art. When complete, Playful Art will provide an interactive and playful experiential installation for all ages.

From this call for artists, the review committee will choose the top three most qualified artists for this project. Those qualified artists will each be provided with a $250 honorarium to develop two project proposals to include a sketch and narrative for a work of art inspired by the theme of “playful art.” The committee is especially interested in work that highlights the location in the River Arts District as well as accessibility, creativity, play, engagement for all ages, and experience. The work could be a sculpture, earth work, or other appropriate and engaging piece to be installed in a park-like setting along the  French Broad River East Greenway. It will be visible from public streets and pedestrian walkways, free of any admission fee.  

Funding for this project comes from the City’s 1% for Public Art commitment. To learn more and/or to stay up-to-date with the River Arts District Public Art projects, please visit ashevillenc.gov/publicart or click here.

For more information, please contact  Stephanie Monson Dahl, Public Art Program Administrator, at [email protected] or 828-337-4111.

Click here for the Call for Artists – Playful Art project description, deadlines and more information.

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City of Asheville to release climate change resource guide and share renewable energy initiative findings

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Interested in local energy and climate issues? Come to the City of Asheville’s Climate Resource Guide release and Renewable Energy Initiative community update.

Set for 5 to 7 p.m. June 19 at The Collider, 1 Haywood St., Fourth Floor, the City’s Office of Sustainability and the Sustainability Advisory Committee on Energy and the Environment (SACEE) will share information on how — as a community and individually — we can become better prepared and more resilient to the effects of climate change. The event will feature the release of “Building a Climate-Resilient Asheville — Personal Action Guide.”

Asheville has a history of climate-related impacts — major floods in 1916 and 2004, landslides, nuisance flooding, wildfires, and the record drought of 2007–2008, to name a few. The city is also facing other stressors, like pressures from population growth, increasing demand for city services, economic changes, land use issues, and the desire to preserve a sense of place.  Click here to continue reading

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City of Asheville earns GIS award for racial equity mapping project

Cover to presentation titled Mapping Racial Equity in Asheville, NC

The City of Asheville was recently awarded the North Carolina G. Herbert Stout Award for Visionary Use of GIS in support of the City’s Mapping Racial Equity project.

Asheville was recognized during the 2019 N.C. GIS Conference in Winston-Salem. City Council officials received the award during their May 14 meeting.

GIS is a geographic information system used as a framework for gathering, managing and analyzing data.

The GIS team worked with the Equity & Inclusion office to map and record some of Asheville’s history around race. This included mapping out areas where red-lining and urban renewal occurred. They also crowd-sourced African American history, displacement and neighborhood change.

The City of Asheville is a member of the Government Alliance on Racial Equity (GARE) and is able to use its resources and network to continue learning and advancing racial equity goals in Asheville.  “In order for transformation to occur, an understanding of our racialized history is required,” said Kimberlee Archie, Director of Equity and Inclusion for the City of Asheville. “There are specific past and current policies, procedures, practices, and budget decisions that result in disparate outcomes by race.  A mapping tool such as this is critical for us to use for change to occur.”  Click here to continue reading


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The National Memorial for Peace and Justice – Equal Justice Initiative (EJI)

This is an experience that touches the heart and soul – not to be missed!

This information and pictures are offered by Ed Raiola

The Equal Justice Initiative (EJI) is committed to ending mass incarceration and excessive punishment in the United States, to challenging racial and economic injustice, and to protecting basic human rights for the most vulnerable people in American society.  


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Central Park’s first-ever female statue is coming in 2020

The women behind the first statue of a woman from history to be erected in New York City’s Central Park discuss its groundbreaking importance.

In 1995, the artist Meredith Bergmann was working on a film set in Central Park when she noticed something was off. 

“I noticed then there were no statues of women,” said Bergmann. “There was a wonderful Alice in Wonderland sculpture, but there were no sculptures of actual women of note and accomplishment.”  Click here to continue reading


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BLACK MOUNTAIN CENTER for the ARTS

 “Ours is a community arts center with a mission of “bringing arts to the people and people to the arts.”

The Black Mountain Center for the Arts (BMCA) was the dream of a small group of visionaries, who in 1993 organized and found a way to save the Old City Hall from destruction. They obtained the building, raised over a million dollars and succeeded in renovating the 6,000-square-foot facility into a welcoming and vital landmark. BMCA was incorporated in 1995 and opened its doors in October 2000. In 2009, the Old City Garage was also renovated and made into a clay studio behind the main building. This community arts organization has sought to create a physical place for the arts to come together and flourish in the Swannanoa Valley in Buncombe County.  See our website for more information


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