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Poetry, Literature, Writing

Writers in Western North Carolina? Yes! Asheville has been a haven for writers for well over a century. The mountains have proved an inspiration to those who write whether for personal enjoyment solely or for publication.
Great Smokies Writing River Review: Arts & Culture MagazineProgram     The Writers’ Workshop of Asheville     NC Writers’ Network     Writing Center at AB Tech     The Asheville Poetry Review      Rapid River Review: Arts & Culture Magazine    Jane’s Circles

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The 15 Books to Read by Women in 2020

In the Washington Post Lily Lines – Story by Neema Roshania Patel – Illustrations by Maria Alaconada Brooks

It’s a new year and like many, you may have made a resolution to read more. Or maybe you’re simply looking for the next great novel you won’t be able to put down. Either way, we’ve got the list for you. 

This roundup focuses on fiction titles, all by women, all set for release in the first half of this year. We hope you enjoy it and find a book that sticks with you. The kind you can’t put down and can’t stop thinking about once you’re done with it. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE


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The Secret Society of Women Writers in Oxford in the 1920s

In Literary Hub: By Mo Moulton on the Legendary Mutual Admiration Society

It began in a quiet sort of way, over hot cocoa and toasted marshmallows in a student room at Somerville College, Oxford. One evening in November 1912, some new friends, all first-year students, gathered “to read aloud our literary efforts and to receive and deliver criticism.” They brought stories, poems, essays, plays, and fables, and they received far more than merely criticism. In the firelight, over economical treats, they created a space in which they could grow beyond the limitations of Edwardian girlhood and become complex, creative adults with a radically capacious notion of what it might mean to be both human and female. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

 


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ADRIENNE RICH on the Political Power of Poetry and Its Role in the Immigrant Experience

One summer evening not long ago, on a rainy Brooklyn rooftop, a friend — a brilliant friend who studies the cosmos and writes uncommonly poetic novels — stunned me with an improbable, deceptively simple yet enormous question: “What does poetry do?”

I fumbled for Baldwin: “The poets [are] the only people who know the truth about us. Soldiers don’t. Statesmen don’t. Priests don’t. Union leaders don’t. Only poets.” And then I mumbled something about how poetry gives shape to our experiences through language, thus conferring validity and dignity upon them, enlarging our access to our own humanity. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE


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“Children need art and stories and poems and music as much as they need love and food and fresh air and play. “

Wise words from Philip Pullman, who received the Astrid Lindgren Memorial Award in 2005:

Children need art and stories and poems and music as much as they need love and food and fresh air and play. If you don’t give a child food, the damage quickly becomes visible. If you don’t let a child have fresh air and play, the damage is also visible, but not so quickly. If you don’t give a child love, the damage might not be seen for some years, but it’s permanent.


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THE NEW COLUSSUS by Emma Lazarus (followed by Readers’ Poems for 2017)

Not like the brazen giant of Greek fame,
With conquering limbs astride from land to land;
Here at our sea-washed, sunset gates shall stand
A mighty woman with a torch, whose flame
Is the imprisoned lightning, and her name
Mother of Exiles. From her beacon-hand
Glows world-wide welcome; her mild eyes command
The air-bridged harbor that twin cities frame.
“Keep, ancient lands, your storied pomp!” cries she
With silent lips. “Give me your tired, your poor,
Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,
The wretched refuse of your teeming shore.
Send these, the homeless, tempest-tost to me,
I lift my lamp beside the golden door!”


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LISA UNGER BASKIN COLLECTION – Duke University Libraries “The unifying thread is that women have always been productive and working people and this history essentially has been hidden.”

Collection Overview

The Lisa Unger Baskin Collection arrived at Rubenstein Library in April 2015. Carefully assembled over forty-five years by noted bibliophile, activist, and collector Lisa Unger Baskin, the collection is a transformative body of material documenting women at work. In Baskin’s own words,

“The unifying thread is that women have always been productive and working people and this history essentially has been hidden.”


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The Lost Words

The Lost Words – in Daily Good News that Inspires

by Jackie Morris, syndicated from dumbofeather.com in the Daily Good

It has been described as a ‘cultural phenomenon’ by The Guardian, but really it is just a book of spell-poems and paintings. Created as a response to the realisation that we humans were losing sight of the common species, the everyday names of wild things that share our earth, the book’s aim was to re-connect, re-focus, revitalise. As Robert said ‘we do not love what we cannot name, and what we do not love we will not save’.  CONTINUE


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A Viral List of Hundreds of Opportunities for Artists, Compiled by One Person to Encourage Community

By Sarah Rose Sharp in Hyperallergic

Everest Pipkin has made public their “Big Artist Opportunities List” — a collection of over 400 opportunities for artists across the globe.

With the overwhelming reality that artists are expected to somehow maintain a practice, store and ship work, support their scene, self-promote, manage open accounts with galleries — all generally on spec, at least starting out — plus do whatever it takes to pay their bills, who has the time or bandwidth to keep track of opportunities to further one’s practice? 


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WNC LEGACY: LITERATURE & BOOKSELLER Emoke Brac’z – A Life in Bookselling & The History of Malaprops

May, 2018

When I opened the doors of Malaprop’s thirty years ago on June 1, 1982, the first people who walked in the door were a threesome–Marnie, Sandi, and Gretchen. My first customer was a gentleman. We talked for a while and he purchased the Selected Works of Herman Melville, the Random House edition.


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Featured Book TRANSFORMING HATE: AN ARTIST’S BOOK by Clarissa T. Sligh

Transforming Hate is a project comprised of folded origami cranes, photographs, installations, artist books, other image-text narratives, and workshops with local community organizations. In this work, historical elements are used as a framing device to construct the evolution of our shared identity… Origami cranes were folded from pages of white supremacist books.


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