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Poetry, Literature, Writing

Writers in Western North Carolina? Yes! Asheville has been a haven for writers for well over a century. The mountains have proved an inspiration to those who write whether for personal enjoyment solely or for publication.
Great Smokies Writing River Review: Arts & Culture MagazineProgram     The Writers’ Workshop of Asheville     NC Writers’ Network     Writing Center at AB Tech     The Asheville Poetry Review      Rapid River Review: Arts & Culture Magazine    Jane’s Circles

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WYATT EARP AN AMERICAN ODYSSEY, An Historical Literary Fiction Trilogy on the Life of Wyatt Earp by Mark Warren

“Think you don’t like to read Westerns? Adobe Moon will change your mind.” ~ Allison Marlowe, Gulf Coast News Today.

Western historian Mark Warren’s award winning trilogy Wyatt Earp, An American Odyssey transports the reader back to the 19th century West.

“…Warren is able to convey scenes with a cinematic clarity…” ~ Peta Stevalli on Born to the Badge, New Zealand Booklovers


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The Rememberists

By Kara Imle

I’ve been a memoirist since childhood. It started with drawing. Pencil gripped in my fist, I scrawled out the things I saw in my head: herds of horses; packs of wolves; a toothy, bat-winged dragon. These creatures did things I witnessed in my dreams and in my waking life, as I tumbled about in the woods or stared spacily at the walls while my mother tried to get my attention. The adults around me hailed my scrawlings as budding creativity, but to me it was only an observational skill. Perhaps they’re one and the same. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Feature photo by Ross Henderson in Unsplash. Thank you!


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LISA UNGER BASKIN COLLECTION – Duke University Libraries “The unifying thread is that women have always been productive and working people and this history essentially has been hidden.”

Collection Overview

The Lisa Unger Baskin Collection arrived at Rubenstein Library in April 2015. Carefully assembled over forty-five years by noted bibliophile, activist, and collector Lisa Unger Baskin, the collection is a transformative body of material documenting women at work. In Baskin’s own words,

“The unifying thread is that women have always been productive and working people and this history essentially has been hidden.”


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A Viral List of Hundreds of Opportunities for Artists, Compiled by One Person to Encourage Community

By Sarah Rose Sharp in Hyperallergic

Everest Pipkin has made public their “Big Artist Opportunities List” — a collection of over 400 opportunities for artists across the globe.

With the overwhelming reality that artists are expected to somehow maintain a practice, store and ship work, support their scene, self-promote, manage open accounts with galleries — all generally on spec, at least starting out — plus do whatever it takes to pay their bills, who has the time or bandwidth to keep track of opportunities to further one’s practice? 


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“Children need art and stories and poems and music as much as they need love and food and fresh air and play. “

Wise words from Philip Pullman, who received the Astrid Lindgren Memorial Award in 2005:

Children need art and stories and poems and music as much as they need love and food and fresh air and play. If you don’t give a child food, the damage quickly becomes visible. If you don’t let a child have fresh air and play, the damage is also visible, but not so quickly. If you don’t give a child love, the damage might not be seen for some years, but it’s permanent.


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THE NEW COLUSSUS by Emma Lazarus (followed by Readers’ Poems for 2017)

Not like the brazen giant of Greek fame,
With conquering limbs astride from land to land;
Here at our sea-washed, sunset gates shall stand
A mighty woman with a torch, whose flame
Is the imprisoned lightning, and her name
Mother of Exiles. From her beacon-hand
Glows world-wide welcome; her mild eyes command
The air-bridged harbor that twin cities frame.
“Keep, ancient lands, your storied pomp!” cries she
With silent lips. “Give me your tired, your poor,
Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,
The wretched refuse of your teeming shore.
Send these, the homeless, tempest-tost to me,
I lift my lamp beside the golden door!”


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This Conversation is the BREAK YOU NEED – Introducing the Youth Poet Laureates

We introduced two Youth Poet Laureates over Zoom. Dive into their conversation in Lily Lines at the Washington Post – Story by Madeline Weinfield, Illustrations by Maria Alconanda Brooks

You probably know that there is a United States Poet Laureate, but you would be forgiven for never having heard of the Youth Poet Laureate. This country has had a Poet Laureate for nearly a century, but it took until 2017 to formally celebrate the work of young poets with an official title. It was Urban Word, one of the oldest youth literary arts organizations in America, that instituted the position, utilizing panels of esteemed writers to select a Youth Poet Laureate each year not only for their art, but also for their activism. Featured photo by Hugo Ruiz                                                CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

 


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The Secret Society of Women Writers in Oxford in the 1920s

In Literary Hub: By Mo Moulton on the Legendary Mutual Admiration Society

It began in a quiet sort of way, over hot cocoa and toasted marshmallows in a student room at Somerville College, Oxford. One evening in November 1912, some new friends, all first-year students, gathered “to read aloud our literary efforts and to receive and deliver criticism.” They brought stories, poems, essays, plays, and fables, and they received far more than merely criticism. In the firelight, over economical treats, they created a space in which they could grow beyond the limitations of Edwardian girlhood and become complex, creative adults with a radically capacious notion of what it might mean to be both human and female. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

 


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ADRIENNE RICH on the Political Power of Poetry and Its Role in the Immigrant Experience

One summer evening not long ago, on a rainy Brooklyn rooftop, a friend — a brilliant friend who studies the cosmos and writes uncommonly poetic novels — stunned me with an improbable, deceptively simple yet enormous question: “What does poetry do?”

I fumbled for Baldwin: “The poets [are] the only people who know the truth about us. Soldiers don’t. Statesmen don’t. Priests don’t. Union leaders don’t. Only poets.” And then I mumbled something about how poetry gives shape to our experiences through language, thus conferring validity and dignity upon them, enlarging our access to our own humanity. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE


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WNC LEGACY: LITERATURE & BOOKSELLER Emoke Brac’z – A Life in Bookselling & The History of Malaprops

May, 2018

When I opened the doors of Malaprop’s thirty years ago on June 1, 1982, the first people who walked in the door were a threesome–Marnie, Sandi, and Gretchen. My first customer was a gentleman. We talked for a while and he purchased the Selected Works of Herman Melville, the Random House edition.


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