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How Educators Are Rethinking The Way They Teach Immigration History

BY ANNA-CAT BRIGIDA

In the summer of 2017, before her senior year of high school, Isabelle Doerre-Torres met Carlos,* a Salvadoran immigrant on the verge of deportation. Doerre-Torres was an intern at a legal rights organization. She soon learned that Carlos came to Boston nearly two decades ago after he fled gang violence. He’d put down roots in a working class community, where his two daughters were born. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE


Legislators Try to Revive Voter ID

  • January 13, 2020

By some accounts, North Carolina will become the first state in the nation to start its primary voting process in 2020, when absentee ballots begin to go in the mail today (Monday, January 13). But the status of voter ID may still be unsettled, thanks to another last-minute legal request from state House Speaker Tim Moore and Senate President Pro Tem Phil Berger. 

The top leaders of both legislative chambers are trying to revive the photo ID requirement for the primary voting process that begins today. They filed court papers Friday seeking an “emergency stay” of the U.S. District Court order December 31 which put the photo ID requirement on hold as racially discriminatory.  CLICK TO CONTINUE

 

 

A LIBERAL EXPLANATION OF SOME SIMPLE BELIEFS – I just want to be understood…

by Larry Allen

An open letter to friends and family who are shocked to discover I’m a liberal… I’ve always been a liberal, but that doesn’t mean what a lot of you apparently think it does. Let’s break it down, shall we? Because quite frankly, I’m getting a little tired of being told what I believe and what I stand for. Spoiler alert: Not every liberal is the same, though the majority of liberals I know think along roughly these same lines:


THE MOST IMPORTANT BLACK WOMAN SCULPTOR of the 20th century deserves more recognition

Unfortunately, little of her work survives

By Keisha N. Blain in Timeline Medium

ugusta Savage started sculpting as a child in the 1900s using what she could get her hands on: the clay that was part of the natural landscape in her hometown of Green Cove Springs, Florida. Eventually her talents took her far from the clay pits of the South. She joined the burgeoning arts scene of the Harlem Renaissancewhen her talents led her to New York.


Frustration, depression, rage, and pockets of joy: A diary of one woman’s first 30 days of motherhood

We asked a first-time mom to record her thoughts, feelings and actions during the early days of her newborn’s life

By Julie Fei-Fan Balzer   January 9


Forget resolutions. Here’s how to know when it’s time to give something up.

By Lena Felton in The Lily from the Washington Post

Eight experts on when to quit a job, a friendship, your dream and more. This article is part of the Lily Lines newsletter. You can sign up here to get it delivered twice a week to your inbox.

If I could go back, I’d tell my younger self to quit. I would tell her to quit the high school friend who drained all her energy and the long-distance boyfriend she couldn’t give up. Most of all, I’d tell her to quit soccer. CLICK TO CONTINUE

 

 

 

 


The Surprising Science of Alpha Males (Ahem!) – Just remember: don’t call them bullies

by TEDMED 

In this video, Frans de Waal, PhD, a primatologist and ethologist at Emory University in Atlanta, explores the ways that human behavior around community, solidarity, and leadership link directly to primates’ behavior, adding context to our understanding of what it means to be a human “alpha” female or male.


What Sex Means for World Peace

The evidence is clear: The best predictor of a state’s stability is how its women are treated.In the academic field of security studies, realpolitik dominates. Those who adhere to this worldview are committed to accepting empirical evidence when it is placed before their eyes, to see the world as it “really” is and not as it ideally should be. As Walter Lippmann wrote, “We must not substitute for the world as it is an imaginary world.” Click here to read the entire article (This article was suggested by Edward O. Raiola, Ph.D.


The 15 Books to Read by Women in 2020

In the Washington Post Lily Lines – Story by Neema Roshania Patel – Illustrations by Maria Alaconada Brooks

It’s a new year and like many, you may have made a resolution to read more. Or maybe you’re simply looking for the next great novel you won’t be able to put down. Either way, we’ve got the list for you. 

This roundup focuses on fiction titles, all by women, all set for release in the first half of this year. We hope you enjoy it and find a book that sticks with you. The kind you can’t put down and can’t stop thinking about once you’re done with it. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE


The Lost Words

The Lost Words – in Daily Good News that Inspires

by Jackie Morris, syndicated from dumbofeather.com in the Daily Good

It has been described as a ‘cultural phenomenon’ by The Guardian, but really it is just a book of spell-poems and paintings. Created as a response to the realisation that we humans were losing sight of the common species, the everyday names of wild things that share our earth, the book’s aim was to re-connect, re-focus, revitalise. As Robert said ‘we do not love what we cannot name, and what we do not love we will not save’.  CONTINUE


DISCOVERING THE WISE WOMAN WITHIN Yearlong Training February to December 2020

Eight Saturdays
February to December 2020
 
Based in a culture of respect and self-knowledge, this unique “materia medica” developed by Corinna Wood provides tools to nourish your long-term thriving, from the roots up. The program supports the discovery of underlying needs and the development of healthy strategies to navigate the challenges we face as women in the world today.


U.S. WOMEN’S SOCCER TEAM – Time Magazine’s Athlete of the Year

It has been more than five months since the U.S. women’s soccer team won the World Cup, and yet barely a day goes by that Megan Rapinoe doesn’t hear about it from strangers. A young girl at a soccer clinic. A middle-aged man at an airport. Parents the world over via social media. No matter who or where, the topic is always the same: how the team changed a life.


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