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SPRING BIRD MIGRATION:TWO Chances to Celebrate Migration

We’re so excited about spring migration that we are DOUBLE BOOKED today! You now have two options to tune in and learn about the amazing journeys birds make to, from, and through North Carolina.We’re so excited about spring migration that we are DOUBLE BOOKED today! You now have two options to tune in and learn about the amazing journeys birds make to, from, and through North Carolina.

Audubon staff will make an appearance on WUNC’s The State of Things shortly after noon, while others on our team will simultaneously host our regularly-scheduled Birdy Office Hours. Full details below:

Audubon and Migration on WUNC’s The State of Things
Kim Brand, director of engagement, is making a guest appearance on WUNC show The State of Things a little after noon to talk with host Frank Stasio about migration and why we should all be looking to the birds during the pandemic.
When: 12:20 p.m. TODAY
Where: WUNC (click on Listen Live in the top right hand corner)

Birdy Office Hours: May Migrants
Got bird questions? Bring ‘em to Birdy Office Hours. Curtis Smalling, director of conservation, will talk about migration in May and the birds in your yard this month.
When: Noon-1 p.m. TODAY
Where: Zoom and Facebook Live, register now.

P.S. – Don’t forget! Purple Martins Majesty will be streaming LIVE tomorrow at 9 a.m. from Audubon’s Donal C. O’Brien, Jr. Sanctuary on the Outer Banks. Start your morning with the graceful flight and beautiful songs of our Purple Martin nesting colonies. More info here.

 

 

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SheVille Team

We are a one-of-a-kind magazine that provides local, regional, national and international information about women’s lives and education, performing and visual arts and writing, the environment, green living and sustainability and regional Western North Carolina business, people and events. “Villages preserve culture: dress, food and dance are a few examples. As villages grow in population and turn into towns, local cafes make way for large American chains. Handmade leather sandals are discarded for a pair of Western sneakers. Due to its small size, a village fosters a tight-knit sense of community. Justpeace.org explains the meaning of the African proverb, “It takes a village,” by stating that a sense of community is critical to maintaining a healthy society. Village members hold a wealth of information regarding their heritage: they know about the ancient traditions, methods of production and the resources of the land. When villages become dispersed or exterminated in times of war, this anthropological knowledge disappears. Large cities are not as conducive to growing and producing foods such as fruits and vegetables. Villages, on the other hand, usually have ample amounts of land and other resources necessary for growing conditions.” The Importance of Villages by Catherine Capozzi Our Mission SheVille.org provides readers with information important to women’s lives and well-being. We focus primarily on the areas of education & health, business & finance, the arts & the environment. We are particularly interested in local & regional resources, organizations & events.

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